Trove Tuesday – Mysterious Aeroplanes

The media is often accused of fear mongering and it seems it was no different 100 years ago.  The onset of WW1 saw reporting that heightened fear with people leaping at shadows believing the Germans were invading Australia.

When I first came across the following article, I thought it was an isolated case.  A Victorian drover, Mr Sutton spotted a plane in the night sky after the noise of his agitated cattle woke him while camped somewhere between Byaduk and Macarthur.  While half asleep, he saw two rockets fired.   According to the article, from the Hamilton Spectator his was not the only sighting in the district.

 

tt1

"A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 20 Apr 1918:  .

“A MYSTERIOUS AEROPLANE.” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 20 Apr 1918: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119501085&gt;.

 

The copy of the article was not good so I thought I would see if any other papers reported on the sighting.  Did they what.  A search of “Mysterious Aeroplane” at Trove brought up dozens of reports of various people across Victoria claiming to have seen or heard planes.  The Defence Department investigated, however  some witnesses were doubting what they previously thought they heard or saw.  The Minster for Defence clarified the markings of  the planes of the allies and the enemy which surely wouldn’t have allayed the fear of the public.

 

tt3tt4

"The Mysterious Aeroplane." The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 25 Apr 1918: 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. .

“The Mysterious Aeroplane.” The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 25 Apr 1918: 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74220662&gt;.

 

Dr. Brett Holman from the University of New England has written several posts about the mystery planes of the WW1 period on his site, Airminded.  You can read one of those on the following link, with his explanation on the large number of reports of mysterious aeroplanes during that time –  http://airminded.org/2012/05/22/fear-uncertainty-doubt-i/

It reminded me of something similar from a previous Trove Tuesday post, UFO Alert about four flying saucers seen over Hamilton in January 1954.  Sci-Fi films were moving in to the realm of UFOs and aliens and in the same month as the sighting, The Argus was publishing installments of “War of the Worlds.”

Mysterious aeroplanes aside, what was really mysterious for me was the surname of witnesses from the 1915 and 1918 sightings.  The drover who saw the rockets in 1918 was Mr Sutton.  Three years earlier, Eric Sutton of Redbank, NSW saw the lights of  a plane.   I did check.  There were Suttons living at Macarthur in 1914 and Mr Sutton the drover was possibly Issac Sutton from that town so it’s unlikely there was any connection. Just a strange coincidence.

"GARRA SENSATION." Western Champion (Parkes, NSW : 1898 - 1934) 9 Dec 1915: 28. .

“GARRA SENSATION.” Western Champion (Parkes, NSW : 1898 – 1934) 9 Dec 1915: 28. .

 


Port Fairy Cemetery – Part 1

If you find yourself travelling along Victoria’s south-west coast, don’t miss the Port Fairy Cemetery.

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Last summer, I revisited the cemetery with the aim of photographing as many headstones as possible.  During our four days in Port Fairy, the weather was hot and our days were spent at the beach.  My only chance was to head off early to beat the heat.   I took the dogs, and after a stop at the beach for a run, them not me, we arrived at the cemetery around 7.30am.

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Taking photos and holding two dogs on leads, is not an easy task.  I’m glad they didn’t see the rabbits sitting among the graves but I didn’t count on the burrs.  Soon the dogs were stopping periodically to pick burrs from their paws.  I didn’t get as many photos as I would have liked but I have captured some of the older and more interesting headstones.  I will post the photos in two parts.

On one of my past visits to the Port Fairy Cemetery, I joined a tour run by the Port Fairy Genealogical Society.  It was fantastic and I wished I had our knowledgeable guide Maria Cameron on this visit as I tried to remember the stories behind the graves.

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As sealers and whalers, Charles Mills and his older brother John, first saw Port Fairy in 1826, eight years before the Henty brothers arrived at Portland.  However, their whaling camps were not considered permanent in comparison to the Henty settlement, thus the Hentys take the title of first European settlers in Victoria in most discussions on the topic.  Launceston born Charles Mills passed away in 1855 aged 43 and John in 1877 aged 66.   The biography of the brothers is on this link – John and Charles Mills 

 

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HEADSTONE OF BROTHERS CHARLES AND JOHN MILLS

 

 

"BELFAST." The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) 21 Nov 1855: 6. .

“BELFAST.” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 21 Nov 1855: 6. .

 

"Family Notices." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 24 Sep 1877: .news-article5938525>.

“Family Notices.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 24 Sep 1877: .news-article5938525>.

 

This was the home of John Mills in Gipps Street, Port Fairy just across the road from the port where he was harbour master.

 

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FORMER HOUSE OF JOHN B. MILLS, GIPPS STREET, PORT FAIRY.

 

106

 

Port Fairy Harbour

PORT FAIRY HARBOUR

 

An obituary for John Mills, published September 28, 1877 in the Portland Guardian:

 

"BELFAST." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 28 Sep 1877:.

“BELFAST.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 28 Sep 1877:.

 

The Portland Guardian published an interesting article about the Mills Brothers on September 21, 1933.  It included their life stories and that of their father Peter Mills who served as secretary to Governor Bligh  – Early Settlers

 

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GRAVE OF BROTHERS CHARLES AND JOHN MILLS (Foreground)

 

William and Agnes Laidlaw were early pioneers of the Port Fairy district, arriving from Scotland with their family around 1841.  William was born on January 20, 1785 and died on April 6, 1870 and Agnes was born on September 20, 1790 and died  on February 12, 1867.

 

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HEADSTONE OF WILLIAM AND AGNES LAIDLAW

"Family Notices." Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875) 23 Apr 1870 .

“Family Notices.” Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 – 1875) 23 Apr 1870 .

 

At least two of their children had great success.  David Laidlaw went on to serve five times as Mayor of Hamilton and was also a leading businessman in that town.   Robert became well-known in the Heidleberg area as a land owner and sheep breeder.  The following is a family photograph taken at Robert’s 90th birthday.  Robert is at the front with the white beard and brother David to his right.

 

"A Nonagenarian Birthday Party." Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) 23 May 1907: .

“A Nonagenarian Birthday Party.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 23 May 1907: .

 

James Andrews (1780-1855) and Elizabeth Andrews (1811-1870) nee O’Brien and their two sons, Michael and Patrick lie in the following grave.

 

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HEADSTONE OF JAMES AND ELIZABETH ANDREWS AND THEIR SONS MICHAEL AND PATRICK.

 

The headstone is difficult to read from the photo, so I have transcribed it:

Sacred to the Memory of 

James Andrews

Formally of Ratoath County Meath

Ireland

Died January 1855 aged 55 years

Elizabeth Andrews

His Beloved Wife

Died 26 August 1870, aged 59

Also their two sons

Michael

Died 3rd May 1854 aged 15 years

Patrick

Died 15 March 1863, Aged 23 years

There was little information around about the Andrews family but I thought I would check shipping records.  An Andrews family arrived at Portland during October 1853 aboard the Oithona.  They were from Meath, Ireland, matching the headstone.  The family consisted of James, aged 56, Elizabeth aged 45, Patrick aged 12, Fanny aged 10, James aged nine and Therese aged 2.  On arrival James snr and the family went on to Port Fairy of their own account.  If this is the same Andrews family, James was in Victoria only two years before he died.

 

After sorting my photos I’m really disappointed with myself.  The following Goldie family grave is one I remember well from the cemetery tour.  Maria pointed out the top of the grave purposely broken off to signify a life cut short. Firstly, I didn’t get a photo of the top of the grave and secondly I didn’t get a photo of the reverse side of the grave

Instead I got the following photo showing John and Elizabeth Goldie epitaphs.

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GOLDIE FAMILY GRAVE

 

If I had a photo of the reserve side, you would also see three babies. It was their the lives cut short:

Catherine Goldie
Died in Scotland Feb 1859
Aged 21 Months

Margaret
Died Sep 1862 Aged 19 Months

John
Died May 1864 Aged 17 Months

John Goldie and Elizabeth Clarke arrived in Melbourne aboard the Greyhound in 1862.  With them were their children, Elizabeth aged 11, James aged 2 and Margaret aged 1.  John was born in 1862 at Port Fairy and Margaret barely survived the voyage, dying in 1862.

John Goldie snr was a pioneer of the agricultural industry, working with the Agricultural Department planting experimental crops.  Photos of one of his experimental sugar beet crops is below.

 

JOHN GOLDIE'S SUGAR BEET CROP TRIALS.   Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. IAN01/10/95/20  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/40232

JOHN GOLDIE’S SUGAR BEET CROP TRIALS. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. IAN01/10/95/20 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/40232

 

John died in 1901 after a cow knocked him down.  Elizabeth had passed away 29 years earlier aged 45.

 

"OBITUARY." The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954) 3 Sep 1901: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73029026>.

“OBITUARY.” The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954) 3 Sep 1901: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73029026&gt;.

 

Son of John and Elizabeth, James Goldie. who was two when he arrived at Port Fairy. was a previous Passing Pioneer – James Goldie obituary

 

The grave of William Kerby goes back to the earliest years of the cemetery.  William was buried in 1847 in a grave with headstone and footstone arranged by his wife Mary.

 

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GRAVE OF WILLIAM KERBY

 

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HEADSTONE OF WILLIAM KERBY

 

Look a little closer at the next headstone and a sad story begins to emerge.  A check of the marriage record of Robert and Annie Grosert sees the story turn sadder still.  Robert Grosert, the son of  a Port Fairy butcher and himself in the trade was born in 1852.  He married Irish immigrant Annie Greer in 1877.  By November 14 of that year Robert was dead and by December 4, so was Annie.

 

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GROSERT FAMILY GRAVE

 

George Best was born in Port Fairy in 1853, a son of  George Best and Lucy Weston.  He married Emilie Melina Jenkins in 1877 at Wagga Wagga, NSW and they settled at Port Fairy.  George enjoyed sailing and it was while competing in a regatta on the Moyne River at Port Fairy in March, 1891, he was knocked overboard and drowned.

 

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BEST FAMILY GRAVE

 

 

A diver recovered George’s body from the river floor.  A team of townspeople worked on George for two hours trying to revive him.  An  account of the drowning appeared in the Portland Guardian on March 13, 1891 and described the incident and the preparations of the diver which makes interesting reading.

An inquest was held into the accident.

 

"THE BOATING FATALITY AT PORT FAIRY." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 10 Mar 1891: 5. Web..

“THE BOATING FATALITY AT PORT FAIRY.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 10 Mar 1891: 5. Web.<http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8482214&gt;.

 

Coincidentally, George’s father, George Best snr a Port Fairy saddler, drowned in almost the same place 30 years before.  His body was never located.

 

"THE EDUCATION DIFFICULTY SOLVED." The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) 23 Apr 1861: .

“THE EDUCATION DIFFICULTY SOLVED.” The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954) 23 Apr 1861: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154888852&gt;.

 

George and Emilie’s daughter, Elsie May Best was buried with her parents.  She died on October 10 1897 at Port Fairy aged 20 years and 10 months.

 

"Family Notices." The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) 23 Oct 1897: 55.  .

“Family Notices.” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 23 Oct 1897: 55. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138629574&gt;.

 

George’s wife  Emilie Melina Jenkins died in a private hospital “Somerset House” in East Melbourne on April 10, 1924.

 

"Family Notices." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 12 Apr 1924:  .

“Family Notices.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 12 Apr 1924: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1903476&gt;.

 

When you walk through a country cemetery and see dozens of unfamiliar names, then later research those names, it’s amazing what you can dig up, so to speak.  Francis Alexander Corbett is one such name. Francis born in 1818, was buried in the Port Fairy cemetery with his wife Ellen Louisa Lane.

 

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GRAVE OF FRANCIS ALEXANDER CORBETT AND HIS WIFE ELLEN LOUISA LANE

 

After searching Trove newspapers, I discovered that Francis arrived in Australia in search of gold and after some time on the diggings went to Melbourne and worked as a reporter for the Argus. Not fond of the work, he moved to the Census Commission conducting the 1854, 1857 and 1861 census as Census Secretary.  He was also a life member of the Royal Society of Victoria.

 

corbett1

 

In 1857 he wrote a book Railway Economy in Victoria and in the same year married Ellen Louise Lane born c1829.  During the 1860s, Francis and Ellen moved to Port Fairy and Francis managed the estate of James Atkinson.  They later moved to Kirkstall near Warrnambool.  In 1889, the following article appeared about Francis Corbett in the Australian Town and Country Journal:

 

"Western Seaports of Victoria." Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) 5 Jan 1889 .

“Western Seaports of Victoria.” Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 – 1907) 5 Jan 1889 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71113608&gt;.

 

Francis was visiting Port Fairy when he died suddenly at the Commercial Hotel (now Royal Oak Hotel) on June 10, 1893.

 

ROYAL OAK HOTEL, PORT FAIRY (FORMALLY THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL)

ROYAL OAK HOTEL, PORT FAIRY (FORMALLY THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL)

"Family Notices." The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) 17 Jun 1893: 42.  .

“Family Notices.” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 17 Jun 1893: 42. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138656519&gt;.

 

An obituary appeared in the Argus:

 

"COUNTRY NEWS." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 12 Jun 1893: .

“COUNTRY NEWS.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 12 Jun 1893: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8563251&gt;.

 

The information contained in Francis’ will was even more enlightening especially that about his brother John Corbett.

 

"Wills and Bequests." Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) 28 Jul 1893:  .

“Wills and Bequests.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 28 Jul 1893: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145711319&gt;.

 

I tracked down John Corbett or rather,  Admiral Sir John Corbett born 1822 and died 1893, five months after Francis.

 

"[No heading]." South Australian Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1895) 16 Dec 1893: 4. .

“[No heading].” South Australian Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1895) 16 Dec 1893: 4. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8442835&gt;.

 

On December 4, 1904, 11 years after Francis, Ellen passed away at St Kilda.

 

"Family Notices." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 5 Dec 1908:   .

“Family Notices.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 5 Dec 1908: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10188785&gt;.

 

Five members of the Finn family lie in the following grave.  The first to pass was John Finn in 1879.  John was the owner of the Belfast Brewery and the Belfast Inn with his licence issued in 1841. He was also one of the trustees of the old cemetery which possibly refers to the Sandhills Cemetery although the Port Fairy cemetery website says. at times both cemeteries were referred to as the “old cemetery.”

 

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FINN FAMILY GRAVE

 

The next death in the Finn, family was John’s daughter-in-law Ellen, wife of Laurence Finn.  In 1896, Laurence and Ellen’s youngest son, George passed away aged 25.

 

"Family Notices." The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) 21 Mar 1896: 45. .

“Family Notices.” The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946) 21 Mar 1896: 45. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139723181&gt;.

 

Another son, William Henry passed away in 1902.  That left just Laurence who died on May 24, 1914 aged 81 years.  His obituary appeared in the May 2013 Passing of the Pioneers.  Laurence died a wealthy man having inherited land from his father, however his will was contested.  A hearing in 1916 saw many witnesses called to assess the soundness of Laurence’s mind when his will was drawn up.  The article is available on the following link – http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73880024

 

Just a handful of graves, yet so many interesting characters and stories.

 

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For more information about the Port Fairy Cemetery, check out the website –  Port Fairy Public Cemetery.   Also ABC Local Radio did a great story on the cemetery including an interview with Maria Cameron and you too can listen to Maria talk passionately about the cemetery.  There are also photos with the story which are so much better than mine.  It is available on the following link  – Radio Interview.  The Find A Grave entry for Port Fairy has had some great work done on it with hundreds of headstones photographed.

 


And the winner is…Hamilton Spectator

"[No heading]." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 6 Jan 1914: .

“[No heading].” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 6 Jan 1914: .

In 1951, the residents of Hamilton banded together in one of the greatest community efforts the town has ever seen.  From 6am to 10pm on a Saturday in December, a team of people met to dig a 165 feet by 50 feet Olympic size swimming pool.  Over the next two years, the volunteers continued their working bees building change rooms and a filtration plant until the pool opened for the summer of 1952/53.  The pool still serves the community today and it’s where many children have learnt to swim, including me.

"One way to build an Olympic pool." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 21 Jul 1953: 20. .

“One way to build an Olympic pool.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 21 Jul 1953: 20. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23257036&gt;.

Hamilton’s pool was the talk of Victoria and leaders of country towns met trying to emulate Hamilton’s efforts.  The Horsham Times of December 18,1951 published the comments of Mr Powell, the headmaster of the Hamilton and Western District College.  He said the efforts of the volunteers “marked a re-awakening of civic pride in Hamilton.”  Continuing, he said the town needed a pool and “a community effort was the best way of attaining it”.

While it in no way rivals the efforts of the people of Hamilton over 60 years ago,  recent activities prove the same community spirit is not dead.  For a week, Hamilton people past and present banded together to make sure the Hamilton Spectator moved a step closer to digitisation at Trove.  And it did, achieving 59% of the vote.

The ‘Spec’ hit the lead early and as the week progressed, the stand out rival was the Gympie Times.  The Gympie supporters were giving it a real push and by last Saturday, the Gympie Times had hit the lead. But Hamilton supporters rallied and by the close of voting on November 30, from a total of 31, 658, the Hamilton Spectator received 18,836 votes and the Gympie Times 10, 139. Coming in third was the Laura Standard with 1082 votes.

The I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria Facebook group was abuzz with excitement, especially over the last weekend.  Former residents from interstate and as far away as The Hague and Texas joined the voting.   The Hamilton community spirit shone through,  seeking a win not just for the ‘Spec’, but also Hamilton.  It’s not surprising. Many group members are descendants of the residents who worked hard to give Hamilton a great community asset back in 1951.

Along with the Hamilton voters, there was also many Western Victorian family and local historians who voted, aware of the benefits the ‘Spec’ will bring to their research.  From the Victoria Genealogy Facebook group to the Rootsweb Western District mailing list, the word was out – “Vote for the Spec”.

So thank you Inside History Magazine and the National Library of Australia for giving us the chance to decide on a newspaper.  We look forward to the next stage of the ‘Spec’s’ path to digitisation,  a crowd-funding project.  I will keep you posted with news of that as it comes to hand.

 


Passing of the Pioneers

This November’s pioneers were an interesting bunch.  There were the sons of pastoralists, a deputy coroner and the daughter of a convict ship surgeon.  For me, it was mason Joseph Richards who caught my interest, arriving in a Hamilton in 1854 and pitching his tent on a block that is now part of the town’s CBD.  He later built the Hamilton Spectator offices.

Duncan ROBERTSON – Died November 1882 at Gringegalgona.  Duncan Robertson was born in Scotland in 1799.  He, his wife and three children travelled to Australia in 1838  first to N.S.W. and then Victoria.  They first settled at Satimer at Wando Vale before Duncan purchased Gringegalgona near Balmoral in 1856.   His brothers John and William took up land  at Wando Vale Station.  More information about Duncan and his family is available at South-west Pioneers.

Charles Henry Fiennes BADNALL – Died November 20, 1885 at Portland.  Charles Badnall was born in Staffordshire in around 1830s.  He arrived in Victoria during the 1850s and first went to the Portland district with a government survey party.  When that work finished he married Mrs Hannah McKeand  and they settled at Hannah’s hometown of Heywood  before moving to Portland.

"Family Notices." Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876) 19 May 1864: 2 Edition: .

“Family Notices.” Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876) 19 May 1864: 2 Edition: .

Charles wrote for the Portland Guardian and was also a correspondent for the Hamilton Spectator.  He sang with the St. Stephens Church choir and was one of the founding members.  Across the weekend after Charles’ death, flags around Portland  flew at half-mast including on boats in the harbour, .   A biography of Charles is on the following link – Charles Badnall

St Stephens Church, Portland

Ann MERRICK – Died November 11, 1904 at Hamilton.  Ann Merrick was born in Somerset,  England around 1814 and married Edward Cornish in 1834.  In 1856 with a large family, they sailed to Australia, landing at Portland.  Edward’s first employment in Victoria was at Murndal Estate for Samuel Pratt Winter making bricks for the homestead which in years and several extensions later would look like this (below)

MURNDAL HOMESTEAD, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T.Collins collection,  Image no. H97.250/31 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230143

MURNDAL HOMESTEAD, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T.Collins collection, Image no. H97.250/31 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230143

After Murndal, the family moved to nearby Hamilton and Edward made bricks for the Hamilton Hospital.  The hospital was officially opened in early 1864, the year that Edward passed away.

HAMILTON HOSPITAL, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

HAMILTON HOSPITAL, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

Ann lived on in Hamilton for a further 40 years and was buried with Edward at the Old Hamilton Cemetery

Patrick LAVERY – Died November 19, 1905 at Minimay.  Patrick Lavery was born in Ireland around 1821 and arrived in Victoria with his wife in 1856.  They settled in Heywood where Patrick worked as a blacksmith and farmer.  After 27 years, Patrick moved to Minimay to farm with his sons.  At his funeral, there were 40 buggies and 25 men on horseback behind the hearse as it travelled to the Minimay cemetery.

George Gilbert HOLLARD – November 26, 1912 at Wallacedale. George Hollard was born in Devon, England in 1817.  He arrived at Portland in 1849 aboard the ship Bristol Empire and obtained work with Edward Henty at Muntham Station before returning to Portland.  During his final years, George took up residence at Wallacedale with his son.  He had great memories of the old times including the Governor of Victoria turning the first sod for the Hamilton-Portland railway in 1876.

"THE GOVERNOR'S VISIT TO THE WESTERN DISTRICT." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 28 Apr 1876: .

“THE GOVERNOR’S VISIT TO THE WESTERN DISTRICT.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 28 Apr 1876: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7437893&gt;.

Mary OSBORNE – Died November 11, 1914 at Portland.  Born in Ireland in 1825, Mary Osborne arrived in Australia as a 10 year-old.  Her father Alick Osborne was a surgeon aboard convict ships and later became the member for Illawara, N.S.W.  In 1852 at Dapto, Mary married Lindsay Clarke of Portland and Mary travelled south to Victoria to settle at Portland with Lindsay.

 

"Family Notices." The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 28 Sep 1852: 3. .

“Family Notices.” The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954) 28 Sep 1852: 3. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12940304&gt;.

On the journey to Victoria, Mary and Lindsay sailed aboard the Lady Bird which was reported to have been a challenging voyage.  So much so, Mary and Lindsay disembarked at Port Fairy and continued the rest of their journey on horseback along the beaches between Port Fairy and Portland.  Mary remained in Portland for the duration of her life aside from six years spent in Hamilton.

Joseph RICHARDS – Died November 16, 1916 at Fitzroy.  Joseph Richards was born around 1830 in Cornwall and arrived aboard the Nestor to Portland in 1854,  with his wife Elizabeth and two young children.  After their arrival the Nestor was scuttled by the crew eager to get to the goldfields.  This account of the Nestor’s demise is from the obituary of Henry Barcham, first mate on the ship.

"[No heading]." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 19 Sep 1910: 2 Edition: .

“[No heading].” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 19 Sep 1910: 2 Edition: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page6067446&gt;.

Joseph arrived in Hamilton, then The Grange,  in November 1854 when there were few residents.  Joseph pitched his tent on a piece of land at what is now the corner of Brown and French Street. From the clues given in his obituary I believe it was the corner below with the brick house.  A couple of years later he purchased a block in French Street, building a home and residing there until into his seventies.

Joseph was a mason and his first job in Hamilton was to slate the roof of the Victoria Hotel which opened in 1855.  He also won the contract to build the office of the Hamilton Spectator (below), constructed in 1873.

 

HAMILTON SPECTATOR

HAMILTON SPECTATOR

The last eight years of Joseph’s life were spent living with his son in Fitzroy.  He was 86 when he passed away and his body was returned to Hamilton by train.   Joseph was buried in the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

George TURNBULL – Died November 19, 1917 at Hamilton.  George Turnbull was born in 1858 at Mt. Koroit near Coleraine to Adam Turnbull and Margaret Young.  George’s father and grandfather Dr. Adam Turnbull snr were in partnership on the property Winninburn.   George tried working for the bank but it was not for him and he returned to Winninburn to farm.  He was involved with the St Andrews Church and Sunday School.

WINNINBURN.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria JT. Collins Collection.  Image no, H98.250/295 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/232375

WINNINBURN. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria JT. Collins Collection. Image no, H98.250/295 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/232375

Frederick SPENCER – Died November 16, 1923 at Hamilton.  Frederick Spencer was born  in 1853 at Portland.  As an adult he took up residence at Dartmoor and was a Justice of the Peace.  In 1911, he was appointed Deputy Coroner for Dartmoor, a role that was long overdue according to the Portland Guardian’s Dartmoor correspondent.

"Dartmoor." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 22 May 1911: 3 Edition: EVENING. .

“Dartmoor.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 22 May 1911: 3 Edition: EVENING. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63980761&gt;.

 

Two obituaries for Frederick appeared in the Portland Guardian, the first on December 10, 1923 that stated he had lived to “be a little over the allotted span.”  Frederick was 70.   He was known for his dry-wit making him a popular chairman at functions.  Three of Frederick’s sons served at Gallipoli.  One lost his life while another had been hospitalised for three years because of the effects of gas.

John Samuel McDONALD – Died November 25, 1932 at Portland.  John McDonald was born in Scotland around 1837 and arrived in Victoria when he was seven aboard the Tamerlane.  His father had arrived at Portland several years before so John, travelling alone, was placed under the care of the ship’s captain.  John’s father went on to build Mac’s Hotel in Portland in 1855.

"DOMESTIC NEWS." Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876) 11 Jun 1855: 2 Edition: EVENING. Web. .

“DOMESTIC NEWS.” Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876) 11 Jun 1855: 2 Edition: EVENING. Web. .

 

182

MAC’S HOTEL, PORTLAND

While his father was building a hotel, John was at the diggings in the hunt for gold.  After some years he settled at Strathdownie.  During the 1870s, he married Eliza McDonald of Horsham and the had a family of 10 children.

 


Vote 1 – Hamilton Spectator

"[No heading]." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 6 Jan 1914: .

“[No heading].” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 6 Jan 1914: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page13375984&gt;.

When the Hamilton Spectator (1914-1918) made it to Trove, I was pretty excited and my post Its Official was evidence of that.   What a benefit those five years of papers have been to my research. But I’ve always thought it was unfortunate more issues of the Spec were not available at Trove.  Portland, through the Portland Guardian & Normanby General Advertiser, the Portland Guardian and the Portland Observer & Normanby Advertiser, is represented from 1842  through to 1953.  Horsham has the Horsham Times from 1882 to 1954.  The Spec would compliment those publications as the newspapers from the three towns were all important voices for the west of the state.

The National Library of Australia with Inside History Magazine are conducting a poll to choose one of  six newspapers for digitisation and the Hamilton Spectator from 1860 to 1913 is one of those.  In fact it is the only Victorian newspaper.  We can make the digitisation of the Hamilton Spectator a reality and the first step is to vote.   If you go to the following link – Vote Now – you can cast your vote.   But hurry…voting closes on November 30. Crowdfunding will raise the money to digitise the winning paper.  With the I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria Facebook group of 3500 members getting behind the campaign, hopefully it will be the Spec.

Inside History Magazine has put together a history of the Hamilton Spectator and you can read it on the link – Spec History

If you need any more incentive to vote, the following from the Hamilton Spectator of November 21, 1914 suggests a few good reasons.

"[No heading]." Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) 21 Nov 1914:   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page13385110>.

“[No heading].” Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) 21 Nov 1914: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page13385110&gt;.


Trove Tuesday – “Don’ts” for Centenary Week

With Portland celebrating its 180th birthday tomorrow (November 19),  my Trove Tuesday post this week is an article published in the Portland Guardian of October 15, 1934 prior to that year’s centenary celebrations.  Superintendent Clugston of the police department offered some timely advice for those attending the week-long celebration.  My favourite “don’ts” are “Don’t hurry or rush about”, “Don’t drive your car or other vehicle in a careless or improper manner and extend courtesy and consideration for all other road users” and “Don’t Guess”.

""DON'TS" FOR CENTENARY WEEK." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 15 Oct 1934: 2 Edition: EVENING.. Web. .

“”DON’TS” FOR CENTENARY WEEK.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 15 Oct 1934: 2 Edition: EVENING.. Web. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287060&gt;.


Trove Tuesday – Fashion Quiz

Table Talk (1885-1939) at Trove is a must for those who enjoy period fashion. Having some knowledge of fashion trends through the decades is invaluable when it comes to dating family photos.  So with that,  it’s time for a Trove Tuesday Fashion Quiz.  I found the following competition in 1930 editions of Table Talk.  Over six weeks, readers could enter the weekly competition and vie for two guineas if their correct entry was drawn.

"Weekly Prize of Two Guineas." Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) 31 Jul 1930: 19. .

“Weekly Prize of Two Guineas.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 31 Jul 1930: 19. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146453482&gt;.

I have chosen the photos from weeks five and six simply because the copy of the photos were best in those weeks.  See if you can guess the years each of the dresses were from.  The date range is 1900 to 1930.  You will find the weekly solution underneath the photos.

Week Five

tab3

tab4

“Weekly Prize of Two Guineas.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 28 Aug 1930: 45. Web.<http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146454103&gt;.

Solution 

This is the entry form included for week six of the competition.

"Weekly Prize of Two Quineas." Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) 4 Sep 1930: 34. .

“Weekly Prize of Two Quineas.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 4 Sep 1930: 34. .

Week Six

tab1

tab2

“Weekly Prize of Two Quineas.” Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 – 1939) 4 Sep 1930: .

 

Solution

How did you go? Why not test yourself on the dresses from weeks one to four listed below:

 

Week 1   Solution

Week 2   Solution

Week 3   Solution

Week 4   Solution

 


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