Category Archives: Pioneer Obituaries

Passing of the Pioneers

This November’s pioneers were an interesting bunch.  There were the sons of pastoralists, a deputy coroner and the daughter of a convict ship surgeon.  For me, it was mason Joseph Richards who caught my interest, arriving in a Hamilton in 1854 and pitching his tent on a block that is now part of the town’s CBD.  He later built the Hamilton Spectator offices.

Duncan ROBERTSON – Died November 1882 at Gringegalgona.  Duncan Robertson was born in Scotland in 1799.  He, his wife and three children travelled to Australia in 1838  first to N.S.W. and then Victoria.  They first settled at Satimer at Wando Vale before Duncan purchased Gringegalgona near Balmoral in 1856.   His brothers John and William took up land  at Wando Vale Station.  More information about Duncan and his family is available at South-west Pioneers.

Charles Henry Fiennes BADNALL – Died November 20, 1885 at Portland.  Charles Badnall was born in Staffordshire in around 1830s.  He arrived in Victoria during the 1850s and first went to the Portland district with a government survey party.  When that work finished he married Mrs Hannah McKeand  and they settled at Hannah’s hometown of Heywood  before moving to Portland.

"Family Notices." Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876) 19 May 1864: 2 Edition: .

“Family Notices.” Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876) 19 May 1864: 2 Edition: .

Charles wrote for the Portland Guardian and was also a correspondent for the Hamilton Spectator.  He sang with the St. Stephens Church choir and was one of the founding members.  Across the weekend after Charles’ death, flags around Portland  flew at half-mast including on boats in the harbour, .   A biography of Charles is on the following link – Charles Badnall

St Stephens Church, Portland

Ann MERRICK – Died November 11, 1904 at Hamilton.  Ann Merrick was born in Somerset,  England around 1814 and married Edward Cornish in 1834.  In 1856 with a large family, they sailed to Australia, landing at Portland.  Edward’s first employment in Victoria was at Murndal Estate for Samuel Pratt Winter making bricks for the homestead which in years and several extensions later would look like this (below)

MURNDAL HOMESTEAD, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T.Collins collection,  Image no. H97.250/31 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230143

MURNDAL HOMESTEAD, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T.Collins collection, Image no. H97.250/31 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230143

After Murndal, the family moved to nearby Hamilton and Edward made bricks for the Hamilton Hospital.  The hospital was officially opened in early 1864, the year that Edward passed away.

HAMILTON HOSPITAL, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

HAMILTON HOSPITAL, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

Ann lived on in Hamilton for a further 40 years and was buried with Edward at the Old Hamilton Cemetery

Patrick LAVERY – Died November 19, 1905 at Minimay.  Patrick Lavery was born in Ireland around 1821 and arrived in Victoria with his wife in 1856.  They settled in Heywood where Patrick worked as a blacksmith and farmer.  After 27 years, Patrick moved to Minimay to farm with his sons.  At his funeral, there were 40 buggies and 25 men on horseback behind the hearse as it travelled to the Minimay cemetery.

George Gilbert HOLLARD – November 26, 1912 at Wallacedale. George Hollard was born in Devon, England in 1817.  He arrived at Portland in 1849 aboard the ship Bristol Empire and obtained work with Edward Henty at Muntham Station before returning to Portland.  During his final years, George took up residence at Wallacedale with his son.  He had great memories of the old times including the Governor of Victoria turning the first sod for the Hamilton-Portland railway in 1876.

"THE GOVERNOR'S VISIT TO THE WESTERN DISTRICT." The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 28 Apr 1876: .

“THE GOVERNOR’S VISIT TO THE WESTERN DISTRICT.” The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957) 28 Apr 1876: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7437893&gt;.

Mary OSBORNE – Died November 11, 1914 at Portland.  Born in Ireland in 1825, Mary Osborne arrived in Australia as a 10 year-old.  Her father Alick Osborne was a surgeon aboard convict ships and later became the member for Illawara, N.S.W.  In 1852 at Dapto, Mary married Lindsay Clarke of Portland and Mary travelled south to Victoria to settle at Portland with Lindsay.

 

"Family Notices." The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 28 Sep 1852: 3. .

“Family Notices.” The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954) 28 Sep 1852: 3. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12940304&gt;.

On the journey to Victoria, Mary and Lindsay sailed aboard the Lady Bird which was reported to have been a challenging voyage.  So much so, Mary and Lindsay disembarked at Port Fairy and continued the rest of their journey on horseback along the beaches between Port Fairy and Portland.  Mary remained in Portland for the duration of her life aside from six years spent in Hamilton.

Joseph RICHARDS – Died November 16, 1916 at Fitzroy.  Joseph Richards was born around 1830 in Cornwall and arrived aboard the Nestor to Portland in 1854,  with his wife Elizabeth and two young children.  After their arrival the Nestor was scuttled by the crew eager to get to the goldfields.  This account of the Nestor’s demise is from the obituary of Henry Barcham, first mate on the ship.

"[No heading]." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 19 Sep 1910: 2 Edition: .

“[No heading].” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 19 Sep 1910: 2 Edition: <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page6067446&gt;.

Joseph arrived in Hamilton, then The Grange,  in November 1854 when there were few residents.  Joseph pitched his tent on a piece of land at what is now the corner of Brown and French Street. From the clues given in his obituary I believe it was the corner below with the brick house.  A couple of years later he purchased a block in French Street, building a home and residing there until into his seventies.

Joseph was a mason and his first job in Hamilton was to slate the roof of the Victoria Hotel which opened in 1855.  He also won the contract to build the office of the Hamilton Spectator (below), constructed in 1873.

 

HAMILTON SPECTATOR

HAMILTON SPECTATOR

The last eight years of Joseph’s life were spent living with his son in Fitzroy.  He was 86 when he passed away and his body was returned to Hamilton by train.   Joseph was buried in the Old Hamilton Cemetery.

George TURNBULL – Died November 19, 1917 at Hamilton.  George Turnbull was born in 1858 at Mt. Koroit near Coleraine to Adam Turnbull and Margaret Young.  George’s father and grandfather Dr. Adam Turnbull snr were in partnership on the property Winninburn.   George tried working for the bank but it was not for him and he returned to Winninburn to farm.  He was involved with the St Andrews Church and Sunday School.

WINNINBURN.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria JT. Collins Collection.  Image no, H98.250/295 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/232375

WINNINBURN. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria JT. Collins Collection. Image no, H98.250/295 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/232375

Frederick SPENCER – Died November 16, 1923 at Hamilton.  Frederick Spencer was born  in 1853 at Portland.  As an adult he took up residence at Dartmoor and was a Justice of the Peace.  In 1911, he was appointed Deputy Coroner for Dartmoor, a role that was long overdue according to the Portland Guardian’s Dartmoor correspondent.

"Dartmoor." Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953) 22 May 1911: 3 Edition: EVENING. .

“Dartmoor.” Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953) 22 May 1911: 3 Edition: EVENING. <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63980761&gt;.

 

Two obituaries for Frederick appeared in the Portland Guardian, the first on December 10, 1923 that stated he had lived to “be a little over the allotted span.”  Frederick was 70.   He was known for his dry-wit making him a popular chairman at functions.  Three of Frederick’s sons served at Gallipoli.  One lost his life while another had been hospitalised for three years because of the effects of gas.

John Samuel McDONALD – Died November 25, 1932 at Portland.  John McDonald was born in Scotland around 1837 and arrived in Victoria when he was seven aboard the Tamerlane.  His father had arrived at Portland several years before so John, travelling alone, was placed under the care of the ship’s captain.  John’s father went on to build Mac’s Hotel in Portland in 1855.

"DOMESTIC NEWS." Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876) 11 Jun 1855: 2 Edition: EVENING. Web. .

“DOMESTIC NEWS.” Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876) 11 Jun 1855: 2 Edition: EVENING. Web. .

 

182

MAC’S HOTEL, PORTLAND

While his father was building a hotel, John was at the diggings in the hunt for gold.  After some years he settled at Strathdownie.  During the 1870s, he married Eliza McDonald of Horsham and the had a family of 10 children.

 


Passing of the Pioneers

Most of the pioneer obituaries found in the newspapers are for men which is unfortunate because we are always searching for more information about our female ancestors.  For the month of October the obituaries for pioneering women outnumber the men.  And great pioneers they were, making great contributions within their communities and all living to a very old age.  But none lived longer than Margaret Walker (nee Brown) of Hamilton.  Passing away in 1939, Margaret reached the age of 104 and remained healthy  almost to the end

Mark Nicholson – Died October 27, 1889 at Warrnambool.  Mark Nicholson was born in Gloucestershire in 1818 and arrived at Port Phillip in 1840.  Rather than practice his profession of law, Mark chose to run cattle at various stations across the colony.  In 1848,  Governor LaTrobe selected him to act as a Justice of the Peace at Warrnambool and in 1853 he was elected as the Warrnambool and Belfast (Port Fairy) representative in the Victorian Legislative Council.  In the following years, Mark spent time in England but returned to Warrnambool to settle in 1873.  A full biography of Mark Nicholson is available at the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

John BEST – Died October 9, 1907 at Portland.  John Best was born in Ireland in 1835 and arrived at Portland in 1857 aboard the General Hewitt.   He travelled with his parents William and Letitia Best and his six siblings.  The family settled at Heywood and John took up work as a carrier.  Later he built bridges and roads for the local Shire. He purchased a farm at nearby Mt. Clay and he remained there until his death.  He left a widow and seven children.

William SCOTT – Died October 7, 1909 at Wallan.  William Scott arrived in Victoria for the gold rushes and settled in Camperdown around 1860.  He took an active role in local politics, serving on the Hampden Shire Council.  He was also secretary of the Camperdown P&A Society.  There was barely an organisation around Camperdown that did not have William Scott on the committee.  His obituary read,

In him has passed one of the rugged pioneers who came magnificently equipped physically, and with the indomitable energy and capacity for sustained effort responsible for the remarkable development that has marked the brief history of this country.

Williams remains were returned from Wallan by train and he was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery.

Euphemia McLEOD – Died  October 3, 1914 at Purnim.  Euphemia McLeod was born in Scotland around 1826 and travelled to Australia on the Edward Johnston around 1854.  She eventually settled at Purnim with her husband George Crowe and she lived there for 50 years.  Euphemia left three daughters and a son.

Ann Rebecca EAGAR – Died October 12, 1917 at Hamilton.  Ann Eager was born in Devon, England around 1832 and sailed to Adelaide in the mid 1850s.  It was there she married George Rowe and they made their way to Victoria, settling at Wickliffe.  They remained there for around 30 years before taking up residence at Hamilton.

Only six months before her death, Ann and George had celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary.  An article appeared in the Ballarat Star of April 14, 1917 reporting on the couple’s anniversary.  It  told of George’s work as a builder.  He worked on several notable buildings in the district including the Coleraine Catholic Church and the Argyle Arms Hotel in Hamilton.  During the war years, Ann supported the cause, knitting socks for soldiers and by the time of her  wedding anniversary, she had knitted 120 pairs of  socks. Ann and George had three sons and two daughters, 28 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.

Margaret BROWN – Died October 1939 at Hamilton.  Margaret Brown was a great Hamilton pioneer living until the grand age of 104.  In her last years, her life was documented as she reached milestone birthdays  Margaret was born in Launceston in August 1835 with her parents having come from Scotland in 1830.  The family sailed to Victoria around 1840 aboard the City of Sydney and in 1852 Margaret married Thomas Walker at Portland.     In the mid 1860s they settled at Hamilton where they remained.  They had eight children but two died as infants.

When Margaret was 98, she was given a walking stick but she had not used it by the time of her 99th birthday in 1934.  That was also the year of the Portland Centenary and Margaret attended the town’s celebrations. During that year she had also produced 17 pieces of eyelet linen work.  In 1935, Margaret’s 100th birthday celebration was held at the Hollywood Cafe in Hamilton with the Mayor of Hamilton, Cr. Stewart, in attendance.  She also planted a commemorative tree for Victoria’s centenary celebrations.  For her 101st birthday, 25 friends and family gathered at Margaret’s home at 5 Shakespeare Street.  The highlight was a birthday cake with 101 candles.  The next three birthdays were celebrated quietly at home but Margaret continued in good health.  That was until only weeks after her 104th birthday when Margaret became more fragile, eventually passing away in October.  During her life, Margaret saw the reign of six British monarchs.

Margaret’s birthday articles 90th Birthday    99th Birthday  100th Birthday   101st Birthday   104th Birthday

Elizabeth SILVESTER – Died October 7, 1940 at Noorat.  Elizabeth Silvester was born in England around 1852 and arrived in Cobden with her parents as a two-year-old.  She ran a business in Cobden for 50 years and attended the Cobden Methodist Church.  Married to William Gilham, Elizabeth left two sons at the time of her death, one of who she had lived with at Noorat for the last year of her life.  She was buried in the Cobden Cemetery.

Robert Thomas SILVESTER – Died October 7, 1943 at Portland.  Robert Silvester was born in Merino in 1862 but as a young man he moved to Portland and trained as a solicitor.  He worked in the partnership Lynne, Silvester and Fielding before going in to practice alone.  From 1910-1920 Robert was president of the Portland Racing Club and was also president and captain of the Portland Golf Club.  Robert was also a member of the Portland Bowling Club and the following link is for a obituary from the club –   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64386872

Catherine McLURE – Died October 29, 1952 at Camperdown.  Catherine McLure was born at Mepunga in 1866, the daughter of James and Eliza McLure, early pioneers of the Warrnambool district.  In 1885, Catherine married  Benjamin Jeffers at Warrnambool and they moved to Strathbogie.  They later returned to the Western District and lived at Timboon, Kellambete and finally Chocolyn were they resided for 40 years.  Catherine enjoyed making toys with her five grandchildren and 10 great-children and telling stories of days past.


Passing of the Pioneers

Just a small group of pioneers for the September Passing of the Pioneers.  While the number of obituaries now available are beginning to dwindle after three years of Passing of the Pioneers, time was more of a constraint this month.  On the bright side, it ensures there will still be some pioneer obituaries to share next September.

Margaret GORMAN – Died September 9, 1914 at Mortlake.  Born in Tipperary, Ireland around 1821,  Margaret arrived in Victoria around 1851 .  She married Patrick Finn in 1855 and they settled in the Mortlake district.  Her obituary read, ‘…she was able by her lovable  manner to render and dispense happiness and sunshine wherever she went.’  Patrick died 34 years before Margaret and she left four sons and one daughter.  Margaret was buried at the Mortlake Cemetery.

Charles Turner MEDEW – Died September 1914 at Allansford.  Charles Medew was born in Cheltenham, England in 1837 and arrived in Victoria aboard the ship William around 1857.  Charles settled in Warrnambool and working as a builder  he built two bridges across the Hopkins River.  He selected land near the Warrnambool Cheese and Butter Factory, and in 1914 the site was still known as “Medew’s Corner” although Charles had moved to Melbourne.  Around 1910, Charles built a model airplane and it is now held by Museum Victoria.  Charles was visiting his daughter at Allansford when he died.

Mrs Mary Gillies - Died September 7, 1917 at Ararat. Mary and her husband  Thomas Gillies were originally from Penzance, Cornwall and arrived at Warrnambool in 1854 aboard the Panama with their infant son.  They went  to the Ararat diggings in 1856 were they permanently settled.  The Gillies family grew to 10 sons and seven daughters and by the time of her death, Mary had 28 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren.  Even into her last years, Mary could recall the early days of Ararat.  Her funeral saw a large turnout as the people of Ararat paid their last respects to one of their oldest residents.

William Howard – Died September 28, 1916 at Ararat.  William Howard was born in Liverpool, England and arrived in Victoria in 1853.  The following year he hit the diggings, first at Maryborough, then Fiery Creek and on to the Ararat region.  He eventually took up the lease of the Terminus Hotel at Ararat and later he built the Ararat Coffee Palace.  At the time of his death he left a widow and three grandchildren.

Thomas SHENFIELD – Died September 2, 1937 at Cobden.  Thomas Shenfield was born at Camperdown in 1861.  The following year his family moved to Cobden where Thomas lived out his life.  He married Nellie Baker of Cobden and they had six children.  Thomas took an interest in the progress of Cobden and was a director of the Tanadrook Cheese Factory (below).  He was also a member of the Cobden Methodist Church.

TANDAROOK  CHEESE FACTORY.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, J.T. Collins collection.  Image no. H98.251/1632 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/234397

TANDAROOK CHEESE FACTORY. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, J.T. Collins collection. Image no. H98.251/1632 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/234397

 

 

 

 


Passing of the Pioneers

A small band of Pioneers come together for August Passing of the Pioneers.  They include the first Mayor of the Borough of  Portland and a crew member of William Dutton’s whale boat.

William McLEAN – Died August 28, 1888 at Port Fairy.  At the time of his death, William McLean had resided at the Port Fairy Benevolent Asylum for 10 years and was known to all as “Old Billy”.  In 1887, he spoke about his life from his time in his birthplace of  Scotland .  William was born around 1790 and when around 20, he joined the navy and was a crewman on the HMS Warspite which brought him to Sydney while escorting convicts in 1822.  After meeting some whalers he decided to jump ship and join them.  The whaling ship belonged to William Dutton, one of the first whalers to Portland Bay and William was with him.

Image Coutesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  PN05/05/77/00  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/78495

Image Coutesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. PN05/05/77/00 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/78495

 

When asked who was the first to Portland Bay, William Dutton or the Hentys,  William replied that Dutton and his crew were there long before the Hentys.  Later, William spent time whaling at Port Fairy where he settled.

Mary GRIERSON  – Died August at Port Fairy.  Mary Grierson was born in Scotland in 1827 and arrived in Victoria with her parents in 1839.  They had sailed aboard the David Clark with Port Fairy’s Captain Mills at the helm.  Mary married David Thomas in 1846 and they settled at Rosebrook, near Port Fairy.  They had a family of 12, six girls and six boys.  Mary was a member of the Presbyterian church and her goodwill was known throughout the district.

Thomas BEVAN – Died August 1915 at Colac.  Born in Devonshire, England in 1829, Thomas Bevan arrived in Geelong in 1851.  He moved to Beeac and became a local preacher for the Methodist Church.  Thomas worked hard to build the community and had a strong involvement in all aspects of public affairs.  He was also a musician, with violin and flute his instruments both learnt while still in England.

George HAYNES – Died August 18, 1916 at Port Fairy.  The Port Fairy Town Hall flag flew at half mast the day George Haynes passed away.  George was one of Port Fairy’s earliest residents and the first Mayor of the Borough.  George was born in Staffordshire in 1826 and at the local grammar school.  In 1854, he and his wife travelled to Australia, landing at Melbourne where they remained for around a year.  George then moved on to Port Fairy where he settled and established a merchant business, Haynes and Young.  Married twice, George had seven children from his first marriage.

Advertising. (1915, February 1). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 30, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94722841

Advertising. (1915, February 1). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 30, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94722841

Joseph LEWIS – Died August 27, 1916 at Port Fairy.  Joseph Lewis was born in Staffordshire around 1824  and travelled to Australia aboard the Royal Saxon, landing at Willliamstown, Victoria in 1841Also on board was a relative of Charles Dickens.  After some time working at Little River Joseph travelled to the Grampians with a Mr Dwyer and they attempted to run cattle.  Unsuccessful, Joseph moved on to Port Fairy and purchased the property Glenview,  residing there until old age when he moved into the Port Fairy town.  Joseph left a widow, four sons, four daughters, 32 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Denis BERMINGHAM – Died August 17, 1917 at Port Fairy.  Denis Bermingham was from Ireland and arrived in Port Fairy aboard the Chance during the 1850s.  Spending time at Koroit and then Woodlands, Denis worked on the land. After moving to Port Fairy the 1880s, he worked for a few years on the harbour.  Denis and his wife had 13 children, nine of whom were still living at the time of Denis’ death.

Robert LEISHMAN – Died August 28, 1917 at Port Fairy .  Robert Leishman was born in Scotland around 1830 and arrived in Victoria as a boy in the 1850s.  After some time spent at Woodford, he settled at Crossley and for many years ran the farm Cockpen.  He had also spent some time working on Korongah Station, then owned by Messrs. Knight and Lydiard.  It was there, during the 1870s that Robert’s wife passed away.  During their time together they had a family of five.  In the last years of Robert’s life, he moved to Rosebrook and then Bank Street, Port Fairy.

 


Passing of the Pioneers

When I started posting pioneer obituaries under the heading “Passing of the Pioneers” in July 2011, I never imagined that “Passing of the Pioneers” would still be going three years on.  (I didn’t think Western District Families would still be going).  Nor did I expect that I could announce this month marks the posting of the  500th pioneer obituary.  Over the three years, thanks to the stories of those 500 pioneers, the amount I have learnt about Western District history and the families who built that history has been invaluable.  However, the best aspect has been the number of people who have contacted me after finding their pioneering ancestor in the posts.  I hope what I have provided has gone a little way toward them learning more about their ancestors’ lives.

The precis I give for each pioneer summarises the obituary that appeared in the paper when the pioneer passed away.  I don’t check the facts written there, such as ships sailed on or years of arrival.  I do search for the maiden name of married women, simply because I prefer to list them with their maiden names and not Mrs A. Smith, for example.  Sometimes I will search for further information about a pioneer and  in the entry I include links to the sources I have found.  So basically, what I give you is an index to pioneer obituaries with a link to the original and from there you can make what you like of the information provided at the time of the pioneer’s death.  Obituaries are, after all, an inaccurate source as the information contained is second or third hand and rarely do you read of negative characteristics of a person or their failures in life.

Importantly, I must thank Trove Australia because without the digitised newspapers I would never have been able to find the 500 obituaries of some of the Western District’s great pioneers.

You can either search or browse the Passing of the Pioneers obituaries. Search a family name in the search box on the side bar of this page or select “Pioneer Obituaries” in the category box, also on the sidebar.  You can then browse through the 36 posts beginning with the most recent.  Simply click on the name of the pioneer to go to the newspaper obituary. If you find a family member, feel free to comment and give more information if you have any.  Leaving a comment increases your chance of finding someone else researching the same person.

 

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This month’s pioneers include two men who knew family members of mine with both men being important figures in their respective towns.  There is also a bricklayer, a publican and one of the men who discovered the Londonderry mine at Coolgardie, Western Australia.

 

Hugh MURRAY – Died July 28, 1869 at Colac.  Hugh Murray was born in Scotland about 1814 and arrived in Tasmania with his parents and siblings in 1823.  At the age of 23, Hugh left Tasmania for Victoria and settled on the banks of Lake Colac before there was a town and today is considered  Colac’s first white settler.  Hugh had pastoral interests but also sat as a Magistrate at the local Colac Magistrates Court.  Last month’s Passing of the Pioneers included the obituary of Elizabeth Young of Hobart who married Hugh Murray in 1841.

EARLY SETTLEMENT AT LAKE COLAC c1875, BY NICHOLAS CHEVALIER.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image No.  H3572 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/81081

EARLY SETTLEMENT AT LAKE COLAC c1875, BY NICHOLAS CHEVALIER. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image No. H3572 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/81081

Hugh  knew my ggg grandparents Thomas Gamble and Ellen Barry but not in the way one would like their ancestors to be acquainted with an outstanding citizen of Colac.  It started with Thomas Gamble, said to have been employed by Hugh Murray to make bricks for his new home at Lake Colac, thus prompting the Gambles to move from Geelong to Colac. Their relationship soon soured.  As early as 1851, Thomas’ wife Ellen faced Magistrate Murray in the Colac Court of Petty Sessions charged with drunkenness, one of dozens of charges she would face during her life and it certainly wasn’t her first.  On January 1853, Thomas Gamble faced court as the defendant in a case against Hugh Murray.  Although the hand writing in the original register of the Colac Court of Petty Sessions (p.83) is difficult to read, I can make out the words  –  “Thomas Gamble – Charged alleged arson in setting fire to Hugh Murray Esq.”.  Fortunately the case was  dismissed.

Peter LEARMONTH – Died July 19, 1893 at Hamilton.  Peter Learmonth was one of Hamilton’s most prominent citizens from the 1860s to the time of his death, contributing greatly to the growth of that town and the  villages surrounding it.  Born in Scotland in 1821, Peter travelled to Tasmania to meet up with his brother William who had already bought land in that colony.  Gold attracted Peter and he left for the Californian goldfields in the late 1840s.  With no success, he made his way to Victoria in the early 1850s and had good fortune on the Castlemaine goldfields. Getting out while ahead during the mid 1850s, he took up a manager’s job at “Merino Downs” station owned by Francis Henty, but not before marrying Mary Jarvey Pearson at Portland in 1854.  By 1859, Peter purchased “Prestonholme” on the banks of the Grange Burn near Hamilton from George Younger and proceeded to build the Grange Burn Flour Mill.  He later purchased mills at  Byaduk, Sandford and Penshurst.  The homestead at Prestonholme” and the mill still stand today on the Mill Road, Hamilton.

PETER LEARMONTH'S PRESTONHOLME MILL.  Photo courtesy of Denis Steer.

PETER LEARMONTH’S GRANGE BURN MILL. Photo courtesy of Denis Steer.

Not satisfied with his milling empire, Peter established P.Learmonth & Co Stock & Station agents in Gray Street, Hamilton.  Peter’s sons continued the business after his death.

P. LEARMONTH & CO. STOCK & STATION AGENTS. GARY STREET, HAMILTON, WILLIAM TIBBITS (c1896). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H83.253/1 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/67235

Peter Learmonth was a member of the Dundas Shire Council for nine years, serving as President for four successive terms, a record he still holds.  He was also one of the first councillors of the Borough of Hamilton.   Peter was one of the driving  forces behind the Hamilton & Western District Boys College and Alexandra Girls School, two schools that built Hamilton’s foundations as an education town.

 

HAMILTON COLLEGE.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, J.T.Collins Collection.  Image no. H97.250/74 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/229855

HAMILTON COLLEGE. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, J.T.Collins Collection. Image no. H97.250/74 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/229855

 

ALEXANDRA COLLEGE, [No heading]. (1874, July 11). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 - 1889), p. 52. Retrieved July 24, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5985586

ALEXANDRA COLLEGE, [No heading]. (1874, July 11). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 – 1889), p. 52. Retrieved July 24, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5985586

The Hamilton Hospital was another of Hamilton’s institutions that Peter Learmonth helped set up and was President of the Hospital for 18 years.

HAMILTON HOSPITAL.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 , http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

HAMILTON HOSPITAL. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H32492/2732 , http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63599

 

Two of  Peter Learmonth’s  children married into families that were also influential in Hamilton ‘at the time.  Eldest son James Allan Learmonth married Annie Thomson, daughter of John Thomson of Monivae in 1886.  A daughter Mary, married the son of another prominent Hamilton man, David Laidlaw jnr, son of saddler and self-made man, David Laidlaw.  Mary’s obituary appeared in April 2013 Passing of the Pioneers.  Messrs. Learmonth, Laidlaw and Thomson were a force to be reckoned with and include Peter’s brother, Alex Learmonth,  also a man of much influence, and it is not surprising that they were able to grow Hamilton into one of Victoria’s most eminent towns.

Later in life, Peter purchased land in Mexico and gave his share to two of his sons.  He also purchased “Correa Estate” near Dunkeld and pursued pastoral interests with much success.

A supporter of the temperance movement, Peter was president of the Total Abstinence Society and the work of he and John Thomson, saw a Temperance Hall opened in Kennedy Street, Hamilton.  They obtained an existing building and converted it to suit the needs of the Society.

As I write my Harman family history and delve into the local histories of Byaduk and Hamilton, Peter Learmonth comes up time and again.  A Methodist, he knew my ggg grandfather James Harman and at one stage James was acting as an agent for farm machinery on Peter’s behalf.   James’ daughter Julia married George Holmes jnr, the son of George Holmes who was a manager of the Grange Burn mill before managing the Byaduk mill.  George Jnr worked at the Penshurst mill and took over the Sandford mill with his brothers.

Peter Learmonth passed away at his home at “Prestonholme” .  He was 74.

Sources:

Dundas Shire Centenary, 1863-1963. Hamilton Spectator for the Dundas Shire Council, [Hamilton, Vic.], 1963.

Garden, Donald S. (Donald Stuart) and Hamilton (Vic.). Council Hamilton, a Western District history. City of Hamilton in conjunction with Hargreen, North Melbourne, 1984.

Glenelg & Wannon Settlers (website)

Macdonald, Anita Mariposa : a story of the Learmonths of western Victoria and Mexico, 1834-1930. Heatherleigh Publishing, [Melbourne], 1982.

John SYMONS – Died July 10, 1914 at Hamilton.  Born in Cornwall around 1828, John Symons’ trade was ship’s carpenter and after his arrival at Portland in 1854, his skills were in demand with much building work required. From Portland, John moved to Balmoral before settling at the Wannon, near Hamilton.  John farmed but was also a contractor for the Roads Board and later the local Shires.  One of his most important works in the district was constructing the bridge over the Wannon River at Redruth, a necessity to enable travel from Hamilton to Coleraine and beyond.  Timber for the bridge was cut using pit saws and John did much of that work himself.  During his marriage, John and his wife raised 11 children with seven still living at the time of his death.

William DUNN – Died July 1, 1914 at Box Hill.  William Dunn arrived in Victoria in 1855 from Somersetshire aboard the “Raven’s Craig”.  After two years in Geelong, he rode by horseback to Hamilton, his home for the next 44 years.  As a bricklayer and builder he constructed the Victoria and Colonial banks in Hamilton with William Holden and  Budock Vean, a home in French Street, Hamilton still standing today.  A devout Methodist, he held various positions within the church.

FORMER BANK OF VICTORIA, GRAY STREET, HAMILTON.  Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins collection, State Library of Victoria.  Image no.   H97.250/89 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230031

FORMER BANK OF VICTORIA, GRAY STREET, HAMILTON. Image courtesy of the J.T. Collins collection, State Library of Victoria. Image no. H97.250/89
http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/230031

Jane DONNELLY  – Died July 1, 1914 at Hawkesdale.  Born in Ireland around 1834, Jane Jenkins arrived in Australia in the 1860s, settling at Myamyn.  She married William Walshe and they raised six children.  In the meantime,  Jane established the Foresters Hotel at Myamyn and ran a store to cater for the many carriers who used the town as a stopover on their travels.  After the death of her husband , Jane remarried to William Jenkins in 1883 and for a time ran the former Victoria Hotel at Portland.

John MUNRO – Died July 1914 at Hotspur.  John Munro was born in Scotland around 1833 and sailed to Hobsons Bay aboard the “Champion of the Seas” in 1854.  Gold must have been his primary reason for coming to Victoria as he spent time around the various diggings before travelling to New Zealand and the goldfields of Otago.  After two years he returned and took up residence at Portland and married in 1867.  For many years he was a storekeeper and post office operator.  He also engaged in farming pursuits and in the early 1890s took up land at Hotspur.  At the time of his death he left a widow and nine children.  He was buried at the Hotspur Cemetery.

Alexander John McLEAN – Died July 23, 1915 at Hamilton.  Alexander McLean was born in Scotland around 1836 and arrived in Sydney as a three-year old with his parents.  They later moved to Victoria, taking up residence at Tower Hill.  From there, Alexander went on to Myamyn and then Macarthur where he was a founding member of the Methodist Church.  Alexander enjoyed telling stories of the pioneer days, before bridges spanned creeks or railways traversed the countryside.  Alexander and his wife had nine children.

Sarah Ann FARNHAM – Died July 21, 1916 at Hamilton.  Born in Somersetshire, England around 1839, Sarah Ann Farnham arrived at Portland  in 1858.  She married Andrew Lockie at Portland in 1860 and by 1866 they had moved to Hamilton were Andrew ran a saddlery business.  Leaving a family of six children and her husband, Sarah Ann was buried at the Hamilton Old Cemetery.

Mary SAVIN – Died July 1918 at Muddy Creek.  Mary Savin was born in Oxfordshire and sailed to Victoria with her parents in 1853.  Around 1855, the family travelled north to Muddy Creek where they settled.  Two years later, Mary married John Addinsall and they had a family of 12 children.  Like many of the early settlers at Muddy Creek, Mary was a Methodist and it was in a crowded Muddy Creek Methodist Church where Mary was given her last farewell.

John HUXLEY – Died July 21, 1918 at Portland.  John Huxley was born in Portland around 1863.  During the 1890s, John travelled to Western Australia, lured by the discovery of gold, but unlike the other July pioneers who chose to seek their fortunes, John struck gold in a big way.  John and several other men discovered the rich Londonderry mine at Coolgardie, Western Australia.  Having made his fortune, John returned to Victoria and purchased the Straun Estate at Merino.  A keen racehorse owner, one of John’s big successes came less than a year before his death, when his horse the Ruralist, trained by James Agnew of Hamilton, won the Great Western Steeplechase at Hamilton in September 1917.  The horse was also a two-time Brierly Steeplechase winner at Warrnambool.  John passed away at his seaside home “Kenly” at Portland and was buried at the South Portland cemetery.

Christina Emily FORD – Died July 26, 1931 at Hamilton.  Christina Ford was born in Macarthur in 1880 into a well-known pioneering family.  In 1905, she married William Baker and they moved to Portland and  raised nine children.  Christina was a keen volunteer for the Portland Football Club and was a member of the Australian Women’s National League.

Charles HOLDER – Died July 21, 1922 at Warrnambool.  The story of Charles Holder’s life appeared in the Portland Guardian on September 28, 1931, nine years after his death and it gives a great account of Melbourne and Victoria in the 1840s.  Charles Holder was born in Bristol, England around 1838 and from the moment he set sail on the “Wardshipton” as a three-year old with his parent and siblings, his great pioneering life had begun.  The voyage in 1841, with almost 300 other immigrants was harsh with 24 deaths including 22 children.  Three of those children were Charles’ young sisters.  Arriving at Hobson’s Bay, Charles, his parents and two remaining siblings, took a steamer along the Yarra River to Melbourne.

MELBOURNE 1841.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria,  Image no. H6262/2  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/87604

MELBOURNE 1841. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image no. H6262/2 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/87604

After spending time on stations around Melbourne, including Dandenong as a boy and young teenager, Charles made his way to the Western District, working at the “The Gums” between Caramut and  Penshurst.  By that time, it was the early 1850s, and Charles headed to the Bendigo diggings but like so many his luck was out and he returned to the west of the state, working at Grassmere near Warrnambool.  In the early 1860s, he selected his own land at Cooramook and remained there for the rest of his life.

An obituary in the The Register (Adelaide) on September 2, 1922 , published at the time of Charles’ death has further detail of his pioneering life.

Ellen OSBOURNE – Died July 15, 1934 at Hamilton.  Born at Portland, Ellen Osbourne married local builder Thomas Cruse and they continued to resided at Portland .  She raised a family and was a devoted member of the Church of England.   Prior to her death, Ellen had been ill for many weeks and as a consequence was admitted to Kia Ora Private Hospital at Hamilton.   Ellen needed a blood transfusion but unlike today when we take  for granted stocks of blood at hospitals,  in 1934 there wasn’t a Red Cross Blood Bank.  Therefore, Ellen’s son donated the blood required for the transfusion.  Unfortunately it was not enough to save his mother.

 


Passing of the Pioneers

The stories of the Western District pioneers continue with June Passing of the Pioneers.  Pioneer obituaries come from a woman who was the first European woman at Colac, a man who survived a ship wreck of Tasmania, and a Reverend who started his career as journalist for the London Times.  Look out for the July obituaries when Passing of the Pioneers celebrates a birthday.

Nicholas COLE – Died June 22, 1879 at Darlington.  Born in England and heir to an estate in Plymouth,  Nicholas Cole decided to try his luck in Australia and arrived in Sydney in 1839.  During his voyage, he met another man Peter McArthur and together they sailed on from Sydney to Geelong.  They became partners and took up the West Cloven Hills and Menningort runs at Darlington.  Those early pioneers faced many hardships including the Black Thursday fires in 1851.  Nicholas ran Merino sheep and built up a herd that produced high yields of good quality wool.  More information about Nicholas, thought to be a desendant of “Old King Cole” the subject of the nursery rhyme of the same name, is at the following links –    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145242490    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29098160   www.stanbury.com.au/history1.htm

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

SHEARING SHED, WEST CLOVEN HILLS (1987) Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection. Image no. H95.200/65 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/217139

Elizabeth Young – Died June 11, 1892 at Barongarook.  Jean Young was born in Scotland in 1823 and as a girl sailed to Tasmania with her parents and her father worked as a solicitor in Hobart.  In 1841, she married Hugh Murray.  They moved to Geelong and Hugh, considered the founder of Colac, moved to that area, before Jean and her young son joined them, becoming the first European woman in the district.  She raised a family of 14 children and endured the many hardships faced by early pioneer women in Victoria.   Among other things, Jean and Hugh were founding members of the Colac Presbyterian church and Jean remained a pillar of the church during her life.  Hugh passed away 23 years before Elizabeth in 1869.

George COXON – Died June 20, 1892 at Portland.  George Coxon was born and married in England and in 1857 , he and his family, including seven children, travelled to Victoria.  After a short time on the Victorian goldfields he took up farming pursuits in the Casterton district.  In his later years he moved to Portland where he passed away.  A profile of George and his family his available on the SW Pioneers website –    http://www.swvic.org/sandford/coxon_george.htm

Lawrence McKENNA – Died June 1914 at Curlew Hill.  Lawrence McKenna was born around 1830 in Ireland and  travelled to Adelaide around 1861.  The South Australian explorer John Stuart was about to leave on a government funded expedition to cross the continent and Lawrence joined his party.  Stuart eventually abandoned his attempt.  After 10 years on the goldfields of Victoria and New Zealand, Lawrence gained work at Woodhouse near Dunkeld in 1872.  He took a trip back to Ireland in 1874 then returned to Dunkeld to marry Elizabeth Irwin and they settled at nearby Curlew Hill.  In 1900, he was badly burnt while trying to protect his property during bushfires and never fully recovered.

Sophia GERDTZ - Died June 5, 1914 at Hamilton.  Sophia Gerdtz was born in Germany around  1831 and arrived in Melbourne during the early 1850s.  Her family travelled to Hamilton, where few buildings stood.  She first married Robert Thomson at Lyne Station in 1852 but was left a widow during the 1860s.  She then married storekeeper Cavendish Neville.  Again widowed, she spent the last years of her life living with her son at Pierrepoint, just out of Hamilton.

 Bridget McNAMARA – Died June 19, 1914 at Tower Hill.  Born in Ireland around 1843, Bridget McNamara arrived with her parents to Port Fairy in 1852 and they settled near Farnham and later Dennington. In 1866 at Warrnambool, Bridget married Hugh Reilly, afterwards settling at Southern Cross were they lived for the rest of their lives.

THE Roroit Sentine[?] AND Tower Hill Advocate. (1914, June 27). Koroit Sentinel and Tower Hill Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved July 1, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119554315

THE Roroit Sentine[?] AND Tower Hill Advocate. (1914, June 27). Koroit Sentinel and Tower Hill Advocate (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved July 1, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119554315

Reverend George Duke LEE - Died June 1915 at Hamilton. Born in Derbyshire, England around 1830, George Lee first worked as a reporter for the London Times in America.  After briefly returning to England he sailed to Victoria aboard the “Blue Jacket” in 1853 and made for the Ballarat goldfields.  He worked as a teacher but left after medical advice as his eye sight was failing.  Instead he went on a lecture tour for the Sons of Temperance Friendly Society through the Western District.  While visiting Chetwynd he became interested in the teachings of the Presbyterian church and entered the Ministry.  He was sent to the St. Johns Presbyterian Church at Cavendish where he remained for 30 years.

Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

ST JOHNS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CAVENDISH (1974). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria J.T. Collins Collection, La Trobe Picture Collection. Image no. H94.200/605 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/217138

When George retired around nine years before his death, he moved to Hamilton.

William ALFORD – Died June 1916 at Ellerslie.  William Alford was born in England around 1831 and 21 years later he travelled to Australia.  He was a steward on the ship he sailed aboard which wrecked off the Tasmanian coast.  William and other passengers were able to reach shore on a dingy and they walked to Hobart without shoes.  William then travelled to the goldfields of Victoria, working as a driver with the gold escort out of Ballarat and later driving the mail coach between Ballarat and Geelong.  He moved to Ellerslie in the mid 1860s and he remained there for the remainder of his life.  William was a caretaker of the local Mechanics Institute and was involved with the Ellerslie Football Club.

James WORLAND – Died June 18, 1916 at Warrnambool.  James Worland was born in Melbourn, Cambridgeshire around 1851 and arrived in Port Fairy two years later with his parents and they settled in the Warrnambool district.  When working age, James took a job at a tannery and later purchased his own tannery.  William also took up many roles in the community including warden of the Christ Church and a founding member of the local branch of the Society of St. George.  At the time of his death he left a widow and nine children.

William DAVIDSON – Died June 1917 at Woolsthorpe.  Born at Aberdeen, Scotland, William Davidson arrived at Port Fairy in 1855.  He first took up labouring at Minjah, a property near Hawkesdale before opening a store at Woolsthorpe.  He later  then turned to dairy-farming .  William was known as “The Chaffer” around Woolsthorpe because he enjoyed having a tease.  A widower at the time of his death, William had 12 surviving children.

 

 

 

 


Passing of the Pioneers

Despite little time to devote to Western District Families as regularly as I would like, there is always time to remember the great pioneers of the Western District with the monthly Passing of the Pioneers.  There are just a small band of pioneers for May, but they each have wonderful stories.  Be sure to click on any of the links for more information, especially the link to the wonderful recipe and remedy collection of Mrs Eliza Duckmanton.

James HANKS – Died May 21, 1909 at Horsham.  While James Hanks was not an old pioneer, he was from a large pioneering family.  He was also my great grandmother’s brother-in-law.  James was born at Branxholme in 1871, the son of Thomas Hanks and Sarah Ashton.   He married Ellen May Harman of Byaduk in 1901.  James had worked in Horsham previous to his marriage and took Ellen to live there.  He worked for Messrs Broadbent Bros., carriers of Horsham and by the time of his death, he was the head carter.  James and Ellen had three children by 1909 and while Ellen was pregnant with a fourth, James fell ill with typhoid fever and died before their fourth child was born.  Poor Ellen was exhausted when her husband’s died, caring for him, the three children, one of those also ill, and coping with pregnancy.

Michael COTTER – Died May 10, 1913 at Dunrobin.  Michael Cotter arrived in Tasmania around 1844 and after 10 years, travelled to Victoria spending time at the Bendigo and Ballarat diggings.  During the 1860s, he started farming at Branxholme and remained there until later in life when he farmed at Carapook.   For a detailed history of Michael including his wife Catherine McIntosh and children, follow this link to the SW Pioneers site  http://www.swvic.org/carapook/names/cotter.htm

Wilhelm PETSCHEL – Died May 1914 at Hamilton.  Wilhelm Petschel born in Saxonby, Germany was one of Hamilton’s earliest pioneers.  Arriving in Adelaide in 1848, he made his way to Portland before taking up a job as a groom at Heywood.  He heard of the land sales at The Grange (Hamilton) and upon inspection of the land available was so impressed he purchased a block, declaring that day the happiest of his life.  William married in 1856 and two children were born from the union.  He was a founding member of the South Hamilton Lutheran Church (today at the Hamilton Pastoral Museum)

SOUTH HAMILTON LUTHERAN CHURCH.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H97.250/65  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/229921

SOUTH HAMILTON LUTHERAN CHURCH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H97.250/65
http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/229921

 

Rev. Samuel FRASER – Died May 1914 at Terang.  Born in Scotland around 1844, Samuel Fraser arrived in Terang  around 1871 sick from consumption, but still able to take up his duties as Minister in the Parish of Mortlake,  based at the Terang Presbyterian Church. His health improved and he remained in the role until his death 43 years later.  Samuel was also the Honorary Treasurer of the Presbytery and clerk of the Presbytery.  Among Presbyterians, his was considered a “model presbytery”.  He married Miss Hamilton, the daughter of the Reverend William Hamilton of Mortlake and they had two daughters and four sons.  Several obituaries were published and they appear on the following links.   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119798095     http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119789693 

 

TERANG PRESBYTERAIN CHURCH.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H32492/3044 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63615

TERANG PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H32492/3044 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/63615

 

 

John DUCKMANTON – Died May 1915 at Dunkeld.  John Duckmanton was born in Nottinghamshire, England around 1833 and arrived on the Yorkshire to Victoria about 1860, settling at  Dunkeld.   John was a carpenter and wheelwright and built the first state school at Dunkeld, among other buildings.  He belonged to the St Marys Church of England, sitting on the committee when the foundation stone of the church was laid and was an active member of the Loyal Duke of Edinburgh M.U.I.O.O.F.   He and his wife had a family of 12 and he left 33 grandchildren. I found an absolute treasure on the Museum Victoria website which is worth a look.  John’s wife Eliza Womersley was a bush nurse and in 1870 recorded her recipes and remedies in a book, using handwritten notes and cuttings from other publications.  The original book can been seen on the M.V. website on the following link – Eliza’s book.

Patrick BALKIN – Died May 17, 1916 at Hamilton.  Born in Kilkenny, Ireland around 1831, Patrick Balkin arrived in Newcastle, N.S.W. aboard the Red Jacket.  After two years he arrived at Port Fairy and then on to the Grange (Hamilton) with his wife Hannah Quinlan.  On arrival at the Grange, the town was only young, with just one hotel.  They settled at their property “Knockaney” where they stayed for the rest of their lives.  Patrick was a member of the Dundas Shire for 22 years and had a wish to advance his chosen place of settlement.  Hannah predeceased Patrick and he left a family of two daughters and three sons.

Jane MASON – Died May 14, 1918 at Strathkellar,  Jane Mason was born in Norfolk, England and arrived in Portland in 1852 aboard the Marmion with her parents.  The Masons settled first at Balmoral before moving close to Hamilton.  In 1865, Jane married Robert Fraser of Glencoe, Hamilton.  Around the beginning of the 20th century, they purchased Seesford at Muddy Creek. They retained the property until only months before Jane’s death when she moved to live with her daughter at Strathkellar.

OBITUARY. (1918, May 18). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 4. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119502066

OBITUARY. (1918, May 18). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119502066

 

 

 

 


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