Category Archives: Trove Tuesday

Trove Tuesday – Monkey Business

This week for Trove Tuesday we go to  Smythesdale, a small town just west of Ballarat with an article from The Gippsland Times of  October 14, 1865.  And guess what?  It’s another animal story, but I love it because it’s almost 150 years old and it is so descriptive, I can clearly picture the lady “tastefully attired in silks” and Constable Monekton removing himself from the scene at great haste.

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NOVEL HIGHWAY ROBBERY. (1865, October 14). Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954), p. 1 Edition: Morning., Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Gippsland Times.. Retrieved November 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65366052

NOVEL HIGHWAY ROBBERY. (1865, October 14). Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 – 1954), p. 1 Edition: Morning., Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Gippsland Times.. Retrieved November 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65366052

As usual, I can count on Trove to help me find the right photo to go with my article.  I am a little concerned about this photo from the State Library of Victoria as the title is “Woman playing with pet monkey” (c1893).  Considering the woman has a stick in her hand and the monkey has its hands on its head, “playing” mightn’t be the right word.  It did however remind me of the scene on the road near Smythesdale.

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H83.47/154  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/23564

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H83.47/154 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/23564

 


Trove Tuesday – Fido, A Family Favourite

This week, I want to revisit one of my earlier Trove Tuesday posts, “Fido’s Feat”.  To refresh your memory here is Fido’s story again and then, a lovely postscript to his story:

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Amazing Story Of Canine Courage And Endurance. (1954, September 14). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24008716

Amazing Story Of Canine Courage And Endurance. (1954, September 14). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24008716

I recently told you about a Facebook group I set up called, I’ve Lived in Hamilton, Victoria, that was, and still is, offering me “A Pleasant Distraction”.  I’ve posted a few Hamilton stories from Western District Families, and one of those was Fido’s story.  So, it was a thrill to hear from Alan Moon’s children, Graeme and Diana, members of the group.

Growing up, the story of Fido’s feat was a family favourite, with Graeme commenting that he didn’t think anyone else knew the story their father often told them as children.  He recalled being “amazed” at the brave dog’s journey from Port Fairy to Hamilton.  Diana told me she would ask her father to tell her the story over and over.  Thank you Graeme and Diana for sharing your childhood memories and for adding to Fido’s wonderful story.

If you are wondering how the Hamilton group is going, it’s going mad.  To give you an idea, one of my favourite quotes comes from Helen – “This site is better than Candy Crush”.  There are now over 1600 members and hundreds of photos.  A “Back to Hamilton” is becoming more of a reality each day which is exciting.


Trove Tuesday – I Had A Dream

It’s Melbourne Cup time again and I love that it falls on Trove Tuesday.  There are many ways to pick a winner and around Melbourne Cup time, you hear them all.  Some go for numbers, the name, the colours or maybe an omen.  Often after the event, punters will claim they dreamt up the winner, and as the “Sound” from the Hamilton Spectator suggested in 1894, they are often not game to declare their selection prior to the race.  But not so John Cameron.  Back in 1894, farrier John Cameron of Lonsdale Street, Hamilton, claimed his Melbourne Cup selection came from a dream and he was happy to share his vision.

The 1893 Melbourne Cup winner was Tarcoola and it was that horse’s name that came to Cameron in his slumber.  He recalled seeing a newspaper listing previous Melbourne Cup winners including Archer for 1861/62 and Tarcoola 1893/94.  So convinced that he had dreamt the winner, he took a Caulfield Cup/Melbourne Cup Double, Paris into Tarcoola.

The “Sound” recounts the most famous prediction emanating from a dream, the winner of the 1870 Melbourne Cup.  The winner Nimblefoot,  the dreamer his owner Walter Craig, owner of Craig’s Hotel, Ballarat.

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Melbourne Cup Dreamers. (1894, October 31). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 5, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65397112

Melbourne Cup Dreamers. (1894, October 31). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 5, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65397112

Are you wondering if John Cameron was a winner?  The first leg of his double come in, Paris in the Caulfield Cup.  The Melbourne Cup winner was Patron, with Tarcoola  unplaced.

PATRON, 1894 MELBOURNE CUP WINNER, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no.  IAN08/11/94/20-21e  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/254730

PATRON, 1894 MELBOURNE CUP WINNER, Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. IAN08/11/94/20-21e
http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/254730


Trove Tuesday – Early Hamilton Sport

What do you know?  It’s another animal story for Trove Tuesday.  This time we go back to the early days of my hometown, Hamilton and a guide to early sporting activities.  Although the population was sparse, residents from surrounding stations would travel for foot racing and horse racing.  But it was an early kangaroo hunt that captured the Spec’s correspondent’s attention.    The article appeared in the Hamilton Spectator in 1914, but the story comes from long before, when Hamilton was known as The Grange.

I have tried to put an approximate date on the said kangaroo hunt and it must have been after 1852 when the Hamilton Inn, opened.  The Botanic Gardens were first gazetted in 1853 but not planted out until 1870.  The first races in Hamilton were held in 1851 at the sight refered to in the article.  Later the racecourse moved slightly north-east to beside what is now Ballarat Road, before moving to the current location on the other side of town. (The Hamilton History Centre Grange Burn Walk Guide p.8)

Another interesting landmark was Mount Craig, a large stone hill on the gardens site.  It was also known as “Shepherd’s View”.  Information from the Hamilton History Centre refers to Mt. Craig and the spring that ran from it, providing water for the locals.  It was located near the current Thompson Street entrance.

Along with the many landmarks that created a clear picture in my mind of the hunt’s route, the article mentions many of those involved with the hunt, some of whom still have descendants in the Hamilton district today.

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EARLY HAMILTON SPORT. (1914, November 25). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 6. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119872739

EARLY HAMILTON SPORT. (1914, November 25). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 6. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119872739


Trove Tuesday – A Sweet Toothed Fox

Today’s Trove Tuesday article is new to Trove as it is from the Weekly Times (1914-1918), a new and most welcome addition.  I came across the article while researching my last post “Sweet Daisy“.  It was not available at the time, but from the small summary I could read, I knew it would be perfect for Trove Tuesday.  My Electronic Friend came through with the article on Friday, just in time to coincide with the Daisy Diwell/MacRobertson Chocolates post and it is an even better story than I first thought.  However, as with most of these “man vs beast” articles, there is a sad ending, but until that end, enjoy the escapades of fantastic Mr Fox of Fitzroy.

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FOX IN A FACTORY. (1914, February 21). Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 4 Edition: TOWN EDITION. Retrieved October 21, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129945279

FOX IN A FACTORY. (1914, February 21). Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 4 Edition: TOWN EDITION. Retrieved October 21, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129945279

 


Trove Tuesday – Ostrich Farming

It was a wish to have a touch of home that saw plants and animals introduced from England in the mid to late 19th century, some with dire results.   Other exotic animals arrived too, such as monkeys.  But it was ostriches that offered a monetary return, with their feathers in demand in the fashion industry.   However, ostrich farming was not all it was cracked up to be, as Samuel Wilson of Longerenong and an unsuspecting carpenter found out in November 1868.  The ostriches, owned by the Acclimatisation Society of Victoria, were acclimatising at Wilson’s property and  had given the first impression they were tame, but as the two men found out, “familiarities are likely to breed contempt”

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MISCELLANEOUS. (1868, November 16). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENINGS. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64691135

MISCELLANEOUS. (1868, November 16). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENINGS. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64691135

 

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/165898

LONGERENONG HOMESTEAD, PRE 1940. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2006.161/4 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/165898

Samuel Wilson must have grown tired of the ostriches as they popped up 13 years later at Murray Downs Station, on the opposite side of the Murray river to Swan Hill.  It was owned by Suetonius and Charles Officer.  Seems they had more of a clue about ostriches than Samuel Wilson.  The birds had gone wild at Longerenong, probably after the trousers incident, with no one game enough to go near them.  Rounding them up to move to Murray Downs was a major operation but once there, the Messrs Officer paired the birds off and accommodated them in small yards, and calm returned…somewhat.

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Ostrich Farming in Victoria. (1881, May 21). The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 6 Supplement: Second Sheet to The Maitland Mercury. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article817426

Ostrich Farming in Victoria. (1881, May 21). The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), p. 6 Supplement: Second Sheet to The Maitland Mercury. Retrieved October 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article817426

 

MURRAY DOWNS HOMESTEAD.  Image Courtesy of State Library of South Australia.  Image no.  PRG 1258/2/1721 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/godson/2/01750/PRG1258_2_1721.htm

MURRAY DOWNS HOMESTEAD. Image Courtesy of State Library of South Australia. Image no. PRG 1258/2/1721 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/godson/2/01750/PRG1258_2_1721.htm

 

OSTRICH FARM, PORT AUGUSTA, SA.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image No.  H82.43/140 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/57060

OSTRICH FARM, PORT AUGUSTA, SA. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image No. H82.43/140 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/57060

After Suetonius died in 1883, Charles sold Murray Downs and the ostriches were on the move again, this time to Charles Officer’s new property near Kerang.

os1Ostrich Farming. (1885, January 13). Kerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette (Vic. : 1877 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65601344

Ostrich Farming. (1885, January 13). Kerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette (Vic. : 1877 – 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65601344

 

ostrich1 (600x800)

OSTRICH, HALLS GAP ZOO

Two years later, and the ostriches had settled in to their new home and were producing feathers of a high quality.

 

VICTORIAN OSTRICH FEATHERS. (1887, October 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 1 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65410783

VICTORIAN OSTRICH FEATHERS. (1887, October 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 1 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65410783

Twenty-six years later, the next generation of Officer Bros. had taken over the ostrich farming.

    OSTRICH FARMING. (1913, March 29). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45239223

OSTRICH FARMING. (1913, March 29). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 15, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45239223

If you are wondering if any of the 1913 ostriches where a part of the group that started out in 1868, well, so was I and it is possible.  In the wild an ostrich can live to up to 40 years and up to 60-70 years in captivity.  The Officer Bros. fed their ostriches well so you never know.

 


Trove Tuesday – Wartime Home Economics

Back in May for Trove Tuesday, I  posted about the “For Wives and Daughters” columns from the Colac Herald.  I’ve got more, this time from April 18, 1917 with hints on keeping the household budget in the black during the hard years of WW1 and we learn which is a better investment, a sausage or a chop.

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A FEW HINTS ON ECONOMY. (1917, April 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 5. Retrieved October 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520295

A FEW HINTS ON ECONOMY. (1917, April 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 5. Retrieved October 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520295


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