Category Archives: Trove Tuesday

Trove Tuesday – Let’s Celebrate

It’s time to celebrate Trove Tuesday.

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H2010.137/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/85452

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2010.137/14 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/85452

On Tuesday August 21, 2012, Amy Lehmann wrote a post on her blog, Branches, Leaves & Pollen called Trove Tuesday – Love, Life and Death in Newspapers.  The aim of her post was to show what  treasures are found on the Trove site that “add a bit of extra colour” to our family history research.  Amy then invited other bloggers to join her the following Tuesday to share their Trove treasures.  The next Tuesday, August 28,  nine other bloggers, including myself, joined Amy and Trove Tuesday was away.

Not all the treasures I have shared over the past 52 weeks have been about my family.  Most have been quirky snippets I’ve stumbled across while researching my family or hunting up pioneer obituaries.  You would have to agree animal articles seem to catch my eye most often.  There have been articles about a feisty dog, a lost kaf (sic), hopping kangaroos and jumping sheep, a slippery snake and a incredibly long snake, a hare hunt and a cat on the hunt.  There was also some “beautiful hair” that could have comfortably housed any of the above critters.

Morality and matrimony also had a good run.  Who could forget Reverend Gladstone of Nathalia and his aversion toward married women attending dances.  There was bottom drawer tips, hints for wives and daughters and those popular Commandments for Husbands and Wives.  Then there were the ladies of the night from Geelong…

The five most popular Trove Tuesday posts over the past 52 weeks are:

Trove Tuesday – Matter of Relativity.

Trove Tuesday – Hamilton Then and Now

Trove Tuesday – Advertisements

Trove Tuesday – What a Newspaper is…

Trove Tuesday – They Say

My own Top 5 favourite Trove Tuesday posts are:

Trove Tuesday – A Lady Motorist

Trove Tuesday – Whispering Wedding Bells

Trove Tuesday – UFO Alert

Trove Tuesday – A Little Chatter About A Magpie

Trove Tuesday – From the Heart

I am looking forward to another 52 weeks of Trove Tuesdays and with all the new papers at Trove there will be many more weird and wonderful treasures to share.  Thank you to Amy for coming up with the idea of Trove Tuesday, we have all enjoyed participating.  Check out Amy’s blog for all the Trove Tuesday posts of the past year.

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image No. H36852 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/192072

Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image No. H36852 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/192072


Trove Tuesday – Let it Snow

Since Western Victoria is experiencing a cold snap with snowfalls around Ballarat and the Grampians in the past 24 hours, I thought a snow theme for Trove Tuesday appropriate.

This treasure found at Trove is a postcard from 1909 and for those that know Ballarat, the scene is instantly recognisable as the former police station in Camp Street.

tt

Snowfalls on the hills around Ballarat and surrounding district are not uncommon, but the snow rarely settles in the town.  Mt William, the highest peak in the Grampians gets a snow cap some winters, but for a short time only.  Further west, it is less likely to snow in Hamilton and from memory in the 18 years I lived there, it may have snowed  once, but it was closer to sleet than snow.  I have never known it to snow as it did in July 1901, when snow fell for around nine hours in Hamilton.  It would have been a beautiful sight.

HEAVY SNOW IN THE COUNTRY. (1901, July 29). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10563557

HEAVY SNOW IN THE COUNTRY. (1901, July 29). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 6. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10563557

With Trove’s help, I found a photo of a snowman built at Hamilton in 1901, held by Museum Victoria.  Unfortunately copyright restrictions don’t allow me to show it here but you can view it by following the link – Hamilton Snowman.

In 1905, heavy snow saw high jinx in the streets of Ballarat that got out of hand resulting in a revolver wielding publican and the Mayor, Councillor Whykes suffering concussion

tt2

FALLS OF SNOW. (1905, September 8). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72817822

FALLS OF SNOW. (1905, September 8). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72817822

In 1910, Hamilton saw another heavy snowfall.  Such was the novelty, snowballing in the streets took priority over opening the shops.  A large snowman was built on nearby Mt Pierrepoint.

 

SNOW MAN ON A MOUNTAIN. (1910, October 11). The Border Morning Mail and Riverina Times (Albury, NSW : 1903 - 1920), p. 2. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111390335

SNOW MAN ON A MOUNTAIN. (1910, October 11). The Border Morning Mail and Riverina Times (Albury, NSW : 1903 – 1920), p. 2. Retrieved August 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111390335

 

Well, this post is my 52nd Trove Tuesday post.  I did it.  I managed to post every Tuesday since Amy Lehmann  launched Trove Tuesday on August 28  last year.  Next week, we celebrate Trove Tuesday entering a second year and I will share some of the most popular posts from the past 52 weeks.

 


Trove Tuesday – The Tiger Again

Last month, the Trove Tuesday post, “They Say”  introduced the Tantanoola Tiger that was causing terror for farmers and their sheep in 1915.  I have now found an article from an earlier sighting at Byaduk in 1896.  You may remember the Tantanoola Tiger was first sighted in 1884 after a Bengal tiger supposedly escaped from a circus visiting Tantanoola in the South-East of South Australia and set out on a path of destruction through that district and the Western District of Victoria.

Mr Falkenberg of Byaduk was certain he was a victim of the tiger in 1896.  Just as the story of the Tantanoola tiger had grown in size, so had the tiger itself.  He thought the “tiger was bigger than ever”so big that it was “as big as most horses”.

THE TIGER AGAIN. (1896, February 14). Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939), p. 28. Retrieved August 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99428658

THE TIGER AGAIN. (1896, February 14). Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 – 1939), p. 28. Retrieved August 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99428658

While the mauling of Mr Falkenberg’s sheep was tragic, I do fear the Byaduk correspondent took the event far too seriously in his report about the “tiger-infested country”.  Thank goodness for the report from the Kalgoorlie Western Argus, almost a month after Mr Falkenberg’s encounter.  That was very much “tongue in cheek” with the last sentence producing a laugh out loud moment for me.

SPORTING. (1896, March 12). Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916), p. 13. Retrieved August 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32210351

SPORTING. (1896, March 12). Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 – 1916), p. 13. Retrieved August 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32210351

I don’t want to add to the hysteria, but I was wondering if it was something else Mr Falkenberg saw…?

No title. (1923, June 20). The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved August 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23695834

No title. (1923, June 20). The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved August 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23695834


Trove Tuesday – Unspoken Memories

Troving never ends. As newspapers come online it’s necessary to check them… just in case.  Often I have filled the gaps in a story or found evidence that supports earlier findings because a “new” paper has arrived on the scene.

That was the case when the Lang Lang Guardian (1914-1918) came online recently.  For the 2013 Anzac Day Blog Challenge, I wrote about my grandfather Les Combridge so it was pleasing to find the following article from June 21, 1918,  that adds to his story .  It is a report on the return home of two Grantville “fighting men” Trooper Cole and Lance Corporal Combridge.   Aside from what I learnt about Les, this article paints a lovely picture of a small town gathering during that time.  There is the decorated hall, singing and of course supper…ladies a plate please.

So what can I glean from this article.   Firstly, there is confirmation that Les was on the troop ship “Southland“.  Also the chair for the night was his future father-in-law, Culmer White.  There is a reference to the difficulties faced by returned serviceman and lack of Government support, giving us an idea of the tone of public opinion during those times.

The horrors of war were mentioned but not elaborated upon and it is clear that Les preferred not to speak of his experiences . He was not the only one.  Mr Bartells  said his boys would not speak of their time in service.  He quipped that it was only those that hadn’t been away that would talk about the War.

The saddest part of this article is the speech by Mr Bartells.  He told Les that he could “spin yarns” about the bombing of the “Southland” when he was an old man.  Les never became an old man.  He died 19  years after that night in the Grantville hall, aged 40.  He would have take those yarns to the grave.

Despite feeling  sad for Les, my mood lifted when I reached the last paragraph.   The final item on the agenda was supper and one of the helpers was Miss White.  Les married a “Miss White”, Myrtle Rose, daughter of Culmer White.  This could have been any one of Myrtle’s three sisters that were also “Miss White” in 1918, but it is nice to think that it could have been Myrtle.  That may have been the beginnings of their courtship.  They probably went to school together but with Les having been away at war for a couple of years they may have looked at each other differently as they each reached across the supper table for a cucumber sandwich.  Les and Myrtle married  15 months later on September 16, 1919.

tt4 tt5tt6tt8

GRANTVILLE SOLDIERS' WELCOME HOME. (1918, June 21). Lang Lang Guardian (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved August 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119515605

GRANTVILLE SOLDIERS’ WELCOME HOME. (1918, June 21). Lang Lang Guardian (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved August 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119515605


Trove Tuesday – Wages

This week’s Trove Tuesday post comes from the Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (1851-1856).  The year was 1855 and the colony was in the grips of recession.  Unemployment was high as immigrants arrived daily and luck ran out on the diggings.  The cost of living was also rising.

If your ancestor was lucky enough to have work during 1855, the following list of wages gives us some idea of the wages they were receiving.  Tradesmen attracted the highest wages and of course there was gender disparity, with a shepherd able to earn £45 per annum while the highest paid female occupation, a cook, only paid £30 per annum.

tt29tt30

tt31

GEELONG LABOR MARKET. (1855, July 7). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), p. 2 Edition: DAILY.. Retrieved July 5, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91866096


Trove Tuesday – Ewe Turn

From the Bendigo Advertiser, via the Hamilton Spectator comes a story from  1868 and the Byaduk Caves.  It features an M.P., an ungrateful sheep, plenty of action and athletic prowess and a band of impressed onlookers.

SUICIDE OF MADEMOISELLE MARIE ST. DENIS. (1868, October 26). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87899437

SUICIDE OF MADEMOISELLE MARIE ST. DENIS. (1868, October 26). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87899437

James Stewart Butters became Mayor of Melbourne in 1867 at the age of 35.  He held the position for a year then moved to the Legislative Assembly in the seat of Portland in 1868, the same year as his feat at the Byaduk Caves.  The following year he found himself caught up in a Parliamentary corruption case and was expelled only to return to his seat a few months later.  He spent time in Fiji and then returned to Victoria and returned to the Parliament.

The events at Byaduk Caves  support his  biography by A.C. Milner in the Australian Dictionary of Biography .  Milner writes

“…this tall, powerful Scotsman displayed immense energy and a bold sense of adventure. The strands of his character were evident in his mountain climbing in Scotland as a boy, investing in the colonies, sailing alone in a Fiji hurricane and tampering with the proper workings of parliament. But an element of recklessness is easily detected, though a hearty and genial personality saved him from much condemnation during his life”.

 

JAMES STEWERT BUTTERS (1867). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H5672 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/208262

JAMES STEWART BUTTERS (1867). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H5672 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/208262

 

I did not have a photo of the caves to show just how impressive James Butters sheep rescue was, however if you click on the link for the Volcanoes Discovery Centre at Penshurst, you will see a photo from the top of the caves, including a ledge (right of shot) that may well be the same ledge the sheep was originally stranded on.

 


Trove Tuesday – Wallpaper

Wondering where that missing newspaper edition is that you searched desperately for at Trove?  Maybe the only remaining copy is buried in the walls of an old building.

 

Historical Committee. (1932, March 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64297702

Historical Committee. (1932, March 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64297702


Trove Tuesday – S.S. Casino

The idea of catching a steam ship from Portland to Melbourne 100 years ago sounds romantic until one considers the stretch of coastline  navigated to reach Melbourne – the Shipwreck coast.  There have been over 200 wrecks along the entire stretch of coast and from Port Fairy to Apollo Bay alone there have been 80 shipwrecks.

Early settlers used steamers to transport wool and other freight to the Melbourne ports and back. Stephen Henty purchased his own steamers to make the trip.  The steamers were also for passage,  an alternative to the rough hair-raising ride of a Cobb & Co coach or later, the train.

Advertising. (1868, February 12). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 1. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5790334

Advertising. (1868, February 12). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 1. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5790334

One steamer that regularly made the journey from 1882 was the S.S.Casino, notching up 2,500 trips along the southern coastline.  Owned by the Belfast and Koroit Navigation Company the ship was built in Scotland.

S.S. CASINO.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H92.302/23 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/195620

S.S. CASINO. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H92.302/23 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/195620

The Casino is the subject of the this week’s Trove Tuesday post because on July 10, 1932, the steamer made its last voyage.  Just short of the Apollo Bay pier, the S.S. Casino struck a sandbar and sunk.  Ten lives were lost.

casino1

TEN PERISH IN WRECK. (1932, July 11). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 7. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4462307

TEN PERISH IN WRECK. (1932, July 11). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 7. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4462307

The Portland Guardian reported on the disaster, noting one of the survivors, 11-year-old Joan Greer, was the daughter of a worker at the Richmond Hotel in Portland.  Remarkably, while the girl travelled on the Casino, her mother took the train for the return trip from Melbourne to Portland.  One of the victims was Helena Gill, the stewardess with 40 years service.

casino3

Wreck of the Casino. (1932, July 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64298698

Wreck of the Casino. (1932, July 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64298698

 

An unfortunate oversight was an advertisement that ran in the Portland Guardian on July 11, the day after the wreck.   It  advised that passage was available to Melbourne weekly aboard the S.S Casino, “weather and other circumstances permitting”.

Advertising. (1932, July 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64298708

Advertising. (1932, July 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64298708

Tomorrow at 11am the Port Fairy Historical Society will remember those that lost their lives on the S.S. Casino, 81 years ago.  More information is on their Facebook page.

The S.S. Casino still lies at the bottom of the ocean off Apollo Bay and is now a dive wreck.  The anchor is displayed outside the Apollo Bay Post Office.  There is more information about the steamer’s history on the Victorian Government’s Department of Planning and Community Development website.

 


Trove Tuesday – They Say

It was the in the Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser that I first found a “They Say” column.  It was actually a regular column in newspapers across Australia, offering a snapshot of  news and  local gossip, often with a humorous tone.   Each item always began with “That” and the news reported ranged from local to international. The time period of the following four articles is 1915 to 1917, so Australia was at war.

White boots at a Kentbruck wedding?  You probably had to be there.  Mouzie is the Parish of Mouzie, near Portland and it seems there had been a sighting of the Tantanoola tiger.  Incredible since the legend of the Tantanoola tiger went back  1884, when a Bengal tiger supposedly escaped from a circus at Tantanoola in the south-east of South Australia and was the suspected perpetrator behind mauled sheep through into Victoria.  By 1915, the tiger would have been over 30 years old.  Regardless,  it is an interesting story with a twist that I intend to follow-up for a future Trove Tuesday.

THEY SAY. (1915, January 18). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675762

THEY SAY. (1915, January 18). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675762

In January 1917, Drik Drik was on the decline and the pressure on men that didn’t go to war was clear.

THEY SAY. (1917, January 11). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675585

THEY SAY. (1917, January 11). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675585

In June 1917, an Victorian State election was on the agenda, but when would it be?  Much like what Australians have endured over the past few days. Again.   Australia’s role in WW1 was costly, with the debt out to £130,000,000.

Amusing was the obituary for a sanitary inspector and the crack at the wealthy for not observing thrift, while they and the State expected those at the lower end of the scale to live an austere lifestyle during wartime.

ts2

THEY SAY. (1917, June 25). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675182

THEY SAY. (1917, June 25). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675182

The following “They Say”, has a more serious tone with mostly international news and was possibly written by a different reporter.

 ts5

http://mywdfamilies.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/ts6.jpg?w=490

THEY SAY. (1918, July 22). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved July 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88197409

In contrast to the last “They Say” this edition was very local with much innuendo.  Harry, Maude, Tom and Olive, if they were there real names, may have had a few questions to answer.  Even if  they were false names, Tyrendarra is so small that anyone at the local dance would have known who “Maudie” was.  Pity any girl named Olive living in Portland during November 1917.

THEY SAY. (1917, November 15). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88674176

THEY SAY. (1917, November 15). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved June 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88674176

Why don’t you check out your favourite newspaper at Trove for a “They Say” column.  A search of “They Say” will bring to the top all the papers that ran the column.  They make enjoyable reading.


Trove Tuesday – What a Newspaper is…

In a week when I have celebrated Trove and the Western District newspapers we can look forward to in the new financial year, I will take you back to 1886 when the Colac Herald defined a newspaper.

What a Newspaper Is. (1886, June 11). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved June 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90323615

What a Newspaper Is. (1886, June 11). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved June 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90323615

This article, from almost 130 years ago, defines our reason to post for Trove Tuesday.  As researchers, reading  newspapers from a time when our ancestors relied on their existence for the characteristics listed by the Colac Herald, we gain an insight into life at another time, or “a bird’s-eye view of all the magnanimity and meanness, the joys and the griefs, one births and deaths, the pride and the poverty of the world…”


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 146 other followers

%d bloggers like this: