Tag Archives: Adam Lindsay Gordon

After Many Days

To really get a feel for a time in history, there is nothing better than a diary, letter, memoir or personal account.  Some of my favourite Western District history books are those from pioneer times, such as “The Diaries of Sarah Midgley and Richard Skilbeck” and James Bonwick’s educational tour of Western Victoria in 1857.  There is another on my list that I haven’t shared with you before, “After Many Day’s: being the reminisces of Cuthbert Fetherstonhaugh.  Even better, the book is available online. (See link at end of post)

Cuthbert Fetherstonhaugh, born in Ireland in 1837, published his memoir in 1918, when he was 81, written, he claims, after much prodding from his wife, Flora and friends particularly a friend from the later part of his life, writer Walter G. Henderson of Albury.   Much thanks must go to them, because their persuading resulted in a  414 page rollicking yarn, packed with places, names and stories from the first half of Cuthbert’s life.  And there are illustrations.

EARLY MEMORIES. (1925, June 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved October 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16211009

EARLY MEMORIES. (1925, June 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved October 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16211009

This is not just a story of the Western District, but of life in Ireland and Germany during Cuthbert’s childhood.  There is also a wonderful description of his passage on a second-class ticket to Melbourne aboard the “Sussex” in 1853.  Cuthbert spent some time in Melbourne before he went to  the Henty’s Muntham Station (p.90) in the Western District, and his account brings 1850s Melbourne  to life.

He outlines his friendship with Thomas Browne/Rolf Boldrewood author of “Robbery Under Arms “(p 40).  He includes the obituary of his father, Cuthbert Fetherstonhaugh, who spent time as a Police Magistrate at Hamilton (p.52).  During his time there, Cuthbert senior, resided at  Correagh at Strathkeller, just north of Hamilton.  (Today, Correagh is in excellent condition and was featured in an issue of Home Life magazine, available online)

There are stories of horse breaking, bushrangers, colonial racing and more.

Some of the Western District identities he met included members of the Henty family, Samuel Pratt Cooke, Acheson Ffrench and the Learmonths.  But there were also stockmen, horse breakers and crack riders.

He associated with Adam Lindsay Gordon (p.165), a person he admired for his riding skill and poetry, and there are several extracts of ALG’s verse.

Cuthbert devoted several pages to George Waines (p177) and the trial, that saw Waines convicted and sentenced to hang for the murders of Casterton couple Robert and Mary Hunt.

After Muntham, Cuthbert travelled to Queensland via Sydney.  On the way he dropped in at the Chirnside’s Mt William Station at the foot of the Grampians.  It is was there he saw the “western mare” Alice Hawthorne, in the days when she was beginning her Cinderella story, transforming from station hack to champion racehorse.

After lengthy reminisces of his time in Queensland, past Rockhampton, Cuthbert then focused on his life in N.S.W where he spent two years as an Anglican minister.  He died in Wellington, N.S.W. in 1925, aged 88, remembered as a pastoral leader.

What the critics said:

At the time of the book’s release, the Sydney Stock and Station Journal described the book as “pure Australian”

GOSSIP. (1918, April 12). The Sydney Stock and Station Journal (NSW : 1896 - 1924), p. 3. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124218838

GOSSIP. (1918, April 12). The Sydney Stock and Station Journal (NSW : 1896 – 1924), p. 3. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124218838

When Cuthbert died in 1925,  Walter Henderson wrote of his friend and the book he persuaded Cuthbert to write.

CUTHBERT FETHERSTONHAUGH. (1925, July 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16210414

CUTHBERT FETHERSTONHAUGH. (1925, July 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), p. 12. Retrieved October 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16210414

Read “After Many Days: being the reminiscences of Cuthbert Fetherstonhaugh” online


Trove Tuesday – Bottled News

Recently, I wrote a Trove Tuesday post about newspapers used as wallpaper in a North Portland building.   This week I have a similar story, but the newspapers in this case were found in a more unusual place.  The Argus of April 10, 1911 reported on the discovery of newspapers under the Birregurra State school.  While finding newspapers under floors my not be unusual, the containers they were in was unusual.  The papers were shredded and stuffed into bottles.  They were obviously not shredded too small as contractors were able to identify the titles of the newspapers and an article about Adam Lindsay Gordon.  Coincidentally, the find was almost 44 years to the day from when the papers were published.

NEWSPAPERS OF 1887. (1911, April 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 9. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10893529

NEWSPAPERS OF 1887. (1911, April 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 9. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10893529

While none of the titles found are available at Trove for the said dates, I was able to find an article about the Autumn Grand National at Ballarat as reported in the Geelong Advertiser of April 13, 1867. The corresponding article was in The Argus of April 13, 1867.

In the feature race, Adam Lindsay Gordon rode Cadger owned by Walter Craig, then proprietor of the well-known Craigs Hotel in Ballarat.  Gordon set the pace and with the remaining four horses dropping off, Cadger and Ingleside were left to fight it out.  The rough and tumble of colonial racing and the fearlessness of Gordon was on display in the final stages of the race.  Cadger baulked at a jump, but Gordon faced him up at again and was able to clear it on the second attempt.  The chase was on but Cadger fell further down the track.  Not to be perturbed, Gordon remounted and continued the race.  Unfortunately, Ingleside had too much of a lead and Gordon and Cadger were beaten by around 12 lengths.

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BALLARAT TURF CLUB. (1867, April 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5764224

BALLARAT TURF CLUB. (1867, April 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 6. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5764224


On the ALG Trail

It must be said, I am an unabashed Adam Lindsay Gordon fan.  Stories of his horsemanship got me in the first time I visited Blue Lake around age seven, during the mid 1970s. As a horse girl, the idea of a man and his horse jumping over the edge of the lake was fascinating .

Unlike school children of the first half of the 20th century, Adam Lindsay Gordon’s poetry was not on the curriculum by the 1970s and 80s. Therefore, my introduction to his poetry was the 1946 edition of  Poems of Adam Lindsay Gordon found in a second-hand book shop.  By then I had heard of his horse racing deeds, his tragic and untimely death and visited his cottage in the Ballarat Botanical Gardens.  How did a dare-devil horseman write such tender words?  How could a hardened horse-breaker, find beauty in the death of a steeplechaser in The Last Leap?

“Satin coat that seems to shine

Duller now, black braided tress,

That a softer hand than mine

Far away was wont to twine

That in meadows from this

Softer lips might kiss

..

All is over! this is death,

And I stand to watch thee die,

Brave old horse! with ‘bated breath

Hardly drawn through tight-clenched teeth

Lid indented deep, but eye

Only dull and dry”

(Extract from The Last Leap, first published: Sea Spary and Smoke Drift, Gordon, Adam Lindsay, Melbourne : George Robertson, 1867.)

ADAM GORDON. (1911, July 1). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved February 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58447919

ADAM GORDON. (1911, July 1). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), p. 8. Retrieved February 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58447919

During our recent visit to Nelson, we crossed the border into South Australia to visit nearby Port McDonnell.  Just out of the town is Dingley Dell Conservation Park, site of  Dingley Dell Cottage, once a holiday home of Adam Lindsay Gordon.  On the day, the temperature was in the low forties and a Total Fire ban, forced the closure of the cottage.  That was disappointing as the cottage houses some great ALG memorabilia, but we still could explore the grounds.

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Gordon spent a lot of time writing while at Dingley Dell during the years 1864 to 1868. He published his work “The Feud” in the Border Watch in August 1864 and wrote poems such as “The Song of the Surf”  inspired by the rugged limestone coast.

In 1912, ALG’s widow, Margaret Park, then Mrs Peter Low, recalled Dingley Dell in an interview published in the Chronicle (Adelaide)

ADAM LINDSAY GORDON. (1912, March 30). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 39. Retrieved February 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88693399

ADAM LINDSAY GORDON. (1912, March 30). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), p. 39. Retrieved February 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88693399

This is the cottage in 1891.  It was still owned by the Gordon family at that time.

Image Courtesty of State Library of South Australia B16893 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/17000/B16893.htm

DINGLEY DELL circa 1891 Image Courtesty of State Library of South Australia B16893 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/17000/B16893.htm

Again, around 1907.

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DINGLEY DELL, circa 1907 Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia B45883 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/55000/B54883.htm

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IMG_20130104_102317_671

The day we left Nelson,we continued on the ALG trail  to Mt Gambier’s Blue Lake, site of Gordon’s legendary leap.  Set in a volcanic crater, Blue Lake itself is full of mystery and on the day the water was eddying and swirling. Add the tale of  Adam Lindsay Gordon and it was almost haunting.

DSCN1319

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During Gordon’s life, and the early years after his death in 1870, despite having some published works, his poetry largely went unrecognised.  It was publications after his death that, by the late 1870s, saw him gain critical acclaim in Australia and overseas and his star began to rise.

The Argus. (1877, October 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5941600

The Argus. (1877, October 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5941600

Searching newspaper articles from his life and beyond, it was the mid 1880s that the legend of Gordon really took off.

Try as I might, including searching the Border Watch every year from 1861 until 1885, I could not find any articles from during his lifetime about the “famous leap”.  Obviously there are limited editions of the paper, particularly through the 1860s.  For example the August 30, 1864 edition in which Gordon’s “The Feud” was published is not available.

It was 1881 before I could find any reference at all and it was written as though the leap was common knowledge. Surely I could have found some mention over a 20 year period, even in with limited editions.  Even obituaries at the time of his death did not mention “Gordon’s Leap”.   The  December 31, 1881 issue of the Northern Argus (Clare, S.A.)  included the article Notes of a Holiday to the South East described Gordon’s feat at Blue Lake.

NOTES OF A HOLIDAY TRIP TO THE SOUTH-EAST. (1881, December 13). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97285462

NOTES OF A HOLIDAY TRIP TO THE SOUTH-EAST. (1881, December 13). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97285462

A  Letter to the Editor in the Border Watch of August 28, 1886 was the next reference I found,  proposed the erection of a monument to Gordon.  From that time on there was rarely an article written about Adam Lindsay Gordon that didn’t mention his leap.

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THE POET GORDON. (1886, August 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77547978

THE POET GORDON. (1886, August 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77547978

This touching letter from H.W. Varley of Adelaide came with “a couple of guineas” enclosed.

THE GORDON MEMORIAL. (1886, September 15). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77548266

THE GORDON MEMORIAL. (1886, September 15). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77548266

Despite a number of men present on the day of “the leap”, consensus could not be reached on the exact point Gordon jumped the fence.  Nor could they agree to the exact nature of the leap or the horse Gordon was riding, was it Modesty of Red Lancer? Even the exact day is unclear.  The Mt Gambier Aquifer Tours website, suggests it was the day after the Border Handicap Steeplechase during the winter of 1864.  I found the results of that race in the Border Watch of July 29, 1864.  The race was on Wednesday July 27, 1864.

MOUNT GAMBIER RACES. (1864, July 29). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77009190

MOUNT GAMBIER RACES. (1864, July 29). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77009190

This makes sense as the leap apparently occurred after a bet was placed by Gordon on a “square up” race with the first and second placegetters, Robert Learmonth and William Trainor.

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BLUE LAKE LOOKING TOWARDS THE AREA (ON LEFT) OF ADAM LINDSAY GORDON’S LEAP

The obelisk was finally placed at a site suggested by William “Billy” Trainor one of Gordon’s closest friends and confidants.  It was right that the American Billy, a former circus performer, was at the laying of the foundation stone as was John Riddoch another of Gordon’s confidants.  In the last years of Gordon’s life, he corresponded extensively with Riddoch sharing his deepest feelings.  The letters were published in 1970 in  The Last Letters 1868-1870:  Adam Lindsay Gordon to John Riddoch.

MEMORIAL OF A. L. GORDON. (1887, July 9). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved February 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46794085

MEMORIAL OF A. L. GORDON. (1887, July 9). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900), p. 5. Retrieved February 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46794085

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The same view toward the monument taken around 1930.

Image Courtesy of the State Library of South Australia B72412 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/72500/B72412.htm

Image Courtesy of the State Library of South Australia B72412 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/72500/B72412.htm

IMG_20130105_100617_888

From Mt. Gambier we crossed the border back into Victoria and the Western District.  We were soon heading for the “Fields of Coleraine”.  Coleraine racecourse was one often frequented by ALG.  Part two of the five-part Hippodromania is the verse “The Fields of Coleraine

On the fields of Col’raine there’ll be labour in vain

Before the Great Western is ended,

The nags will have toil’d, and the silks will be soil’d.

And the rails will require to be mended.

..

For the gullies are deep, and the uplands are steep.

And mud will of purls be the token,

And the tough stringy-bark, that invites us to lark,

With impunity may not be broken.

(Extract from “The Fields of Coleraine”. Published in Sea Spray and Smoke Drift, 1867)

Unfortunately, keeping with  racing parlance, heads were turned for home and there was no stopping at Coleraine (I suppose I had called a rest stop at the Casterton Historical Society, 30 minutes earlier), so I have no photographs of the obelisk in Gordon’s honour beside the Glenelg Highway, east of Coleraine.  A little further on is the Coleraine Racecourse and opposite is Mt Koroit homestead, former home of John Kirby, owner of 1911 Melbourne Cup winner The Parisian.

Before Gordons’s death, he spent time in Ballarat and that is where my ALG trail ended but where it will resume at another time.  However, it was during his time in Ballarat that Gordon suffered his greatest loss, the death of his 11 month old daughter Annie.  He plunged into deep sorrow and moved to Melbourne where he wrote his last poems, his melancholy evident.  Alice’s death, a bad race fall and ongoing financial difficulties saw him sink to his lowest ebb.  He eventually took his own life on Brighton Beach on June 24, 1870 at the age of 36.

When Adam Lindsay Gordon died,  little was written about him, save for coroner’s findings and the standard obituaries, but this moving piece, from the Australian Town and Country Journal  months after his death, by the “Wandering Bohemiem”, a literary writer, brings to light a man many of his Western District contemporaries never saw, and a side only those  of the “supreme brotherhood” would truly understand.  The extract of verse, taken from “A Song of Autumn” published in 1870, was apparently the last he wrote. Clearly written with his dear Annie in his heart it shows the depths he had sunken to.

alg

LITERATURE. (1871, February 18). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 18. Retrieved January 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70464980

LITERATURE. (1871, February 18). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 – 1907), p. 18. Retrieved January 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70464980

And Eastward by Nor’ward

Looms sadly my track,

And I must ride forward,

And still I look back,—

Look back — Ah, how vainly!

For while I see plainly,

My hands on the reins lie

Uncertain and slack.

..

The warm wind breathes strong breath,

The dust dims mine eye,

And I draw one long breath,

And stifle one sigh.

Green slopes  softly shaded,

Have flitted and faded —

My dreams flit as they did —

Good-night!— and — Good-bye!

(Extract from  “A Basket of Flowers”, Bush Ballads and Galloping Rhymes, Bush ballads and galloping rhymes /​ by the author of “Ashtaroth”. [A.L. Gordon]. Melbourne : Clarson, Massina, and Co., General Printers, 1870.

SOURCES:

Adam Lindsay Gordon Craft Cottage

The Adam Lindsay Gordon Commemorative Committee Inc

Brighton Cemetery

Brooklyn Daily Eagle Online

Dingley Dell Cottage

Mt. Gambier Aquifier Tours

Trove Australia


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