Tag Archives: Holmes

Byaduk Cemetery

I enjoy a trip to the Byaduk Cemetery.   When I turn off the Hamilton-Port Fairy Road and drive up the hill on not much more than a track, I can sense the ghosts of my ancestors around me, walking or driving a buggy up the hill following a horse-drawn hearse to the cemetery.  It is like stepping back in time.

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IMAGE COURTESY OF THE STATE LIBRARY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA B62833 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/63000/B62833.htm

There are over 250 burials, in the cemetery and I will share photos of a small sample of headstones, including some of my family.  There are also unmarked graves, such as that of my 4 x great grandparents Joseph and Sarah Harman.

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THREE BROTHERS

Scottish brothers, Colin, Duncan and James Fraser called Byaduk home and became respected residents.

The brothers immigrated from Scotland in 1853 and went to the Ararat diggings.  When land became available in 1861, the brothers went to Byaduk and Colin and James selected “Aird“.

They all at one time lived at “Aird. “James built a hut there but later built a home at “Lower Aird”, the adjacent property.  Colin built his home at “Aird” where he resided until his death.  The Victorian Heritage Database has a concise history of the Frasers and information about the Aird Homestead complex and the Lower Aird Homestead complex.  The Weekly Times ran an article about Lower Aird” in 2009.

Duncan didn’t buy land initially, rather, he returned to Scotland.  In 1871 he was back in  Byaduk with his wife Margaret and four children, Simon, Helen, Donald and William and they lived at “Aird” for a time.  In 1873, Duncan purchased “Camp Creek” where he lived until his death in 1878 aged just 49.

HEADSTONE OF DUNCAN &     FRASER, BYADUK CEMETERY

HEADSTONE OF DUNCAN & FRASER, BYADUK CEMETERY

James and Mary Fraser produced a WW1 hero, 2nd Lieutenant Simon Fraser, and his bravery at the Battle of Fromelles, is commemorated at the Australian Memorial Park at Fromelles.  A statue “Cobbers, depicts Simon carrying a fellow soldier during the battle.

2nd Leuitenant Simon Fraser, 58th Battalion.  Image courtesy of the Australian War Memorial-ID no H05926 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/H05926/

2nd Leuitenant Simon Fraser, 58th Battalion. Image courtesy of the Australian War Memorial-ID no H05926 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/H05926/

A member of the 57th Battalion,  Sergeant Simon Fraser carried men from No Man’s Land.  As he lifted a man on his shoulders, he heard another call out , “Don’t forget me cobber”.  Simon was later promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. The following year he was killed in action.  “Cobbers” has been replicated at the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne.

Colin and Margaret Fraser lived at “Aird” but unlike the other two brothers, they had no children.  “Aird” was later purchased by another well-known Byaduk family, the Christies.

GRAVE OF COLIN &     FRASER, BYADUK CEMETERY

GRAVE OF COLIN & FRASER, BYADUK CEMETERY

I am very thankful to James and Mary Fraser’s third son, Peter Fraser.  It was Peter’s writings of the Early Byaduk History in 1931, compiled from events he kept in diaries, that has given me so much information on the history of Byaduk and the families that lived there.

Peter did not publish his writings, but in 1994, Ian Black of Hamilton, typed them out and published a wonderful little book, Early Byaduk Settlers.  It may only be only 15 pages long, but it is a star on my bookshelf and a must for anyone that has ancestors that lived at Byaduk.  Peter tells the story of the Fraser brothers in great detail.

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There are at least sixteen Frasers buried at Byaduk.  Following are some of the family’s headstones:

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The following headstones are either linked to each other in some way or have direct links to the Harman family

Jane Carmichael (nee Pope) came to Byaduk from Scotland later in life with two of her children, Charles and Emma.  From what I can gather her husband had either died in Scotland or remained there.

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Family Notices. (1917, November 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 1. Retrieved March 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1664422

Family Notices. (1917, November 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 1. Retrieved March 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1664422

Emma Carmichael, born in Dundee, Scotland around 1859 married Albert Harman in 1907.  She was 48 and Albert 39.  Albert was the fourth son of James and Susan Harman.

HEADSTONE OF ALBERT AND EMMA HARMAN

HEADSTONE OF ALBERT AND EMMA HARMAN

Samuel and Jane Tyers did not have any children, but other members of Samuel’s family lived in Byaduk.  There are at least nine other Tyers family members in the Byaduk Cemetery including Samuel’s sister Jane.

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Other than Charlotte’s obituary, I could not find a lot about James and Charlotte Ward.  It was that obituary, however, that helped me find a link between this headstone and the one following it.

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Family Notices. (1904, April 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 1. Retrieved March 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10315347

Family Notices. (1904, April 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 1. Retrieved March 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10315347

This  Holmes headstone has a link to the previous one and to Samuel and Jane Tyers (above).  Joseph Holmes (1862-1929) was the son of George Holmes and Jane Tyers.  Jane was a sister of Samuel Tyers (above).

Joseph married Agnes Brand.  Her grandparents were James and Charlotte Ward (above).  Her parents were William Brand and Agnes Ward and Charlotte’s obituary mentions her daughter “Mrs William Brand”.

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The following headstone belongs to Isabella Ward and her son Charles Ward.  Isabella was Isabella Harman, daughter of James and Susan Harman.  Her sister, Julia, married George Holmes, brother of Joseph Holmes (above).

Isabella married Stephen Ward in 1885 and their son Charles Frederick Ward was born in 1886, the same year as his mother’s death, presumably as a result of the birth.

I had heard from Nana that Henrietta Harman, Isabella’s unmarried sister, raised Charles.  James Harman, in his will, made provision for his daughter Henrietta and grandson, Charles to stay in the house that he owned beyond his death and for as long as needed.  Also, after the death of Henrietta, a trust would allow for Charles’ maintenance.  That was not because Auntie Henrietta outlived her much-loved nephew Charles.  He died in 1928 at Ballarat.

IMG_1830Henrietta Harman was Nana’s great-aunt and she could recall as s a child,  Auntie Henrietta visiting their home.  That would have been during the 1920s and 30s.  Henrietta would catch the coach from Byaduk to Hamilton.  “She was a dear old thing” Nana would say.  I think maybe because Nana, Linda Henrietta, was named after her great-aunt she felt a special bond.  Henrietta passed away in 1952 and was buried in a simple grave at Byaduk,.

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Catherine Harman was the wife of my great-great uncle Charles James Harman, son of Reuben James Harman and Elizabeth Bishop.  Catherine was Catherine Kinghorn, daughter of Francis Kinghorn and Elizabeth White.  Born in 1868 at Byaduk, Catherine married Charles, at the age of 37, in 1905.  Charles was 10 years her junior.  Catherine died in hospital in  Melbourne in 1913.  Charles enlisted in the Australian Flying Corps in 1916 and remarried in 1922 to Lavinia Raven Fisher of Middle Park.

IMG_1845William Leslie Harman was born in 1888 at Byaduk, the third child and eldest son of Alfred Harman and Louisa Newman.  William was the grandson of James and Sarah Harman.

IMG_1838Isabel Bunworth was Isabel Harman, the sixth daughter of Alfred and Louisa Harman and sister of William (above).  Isabel married John Bunworth of Byaduk in 1923.

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Gershom Harman (1869-1940) was the second son of Reuben Harman and Elizabeth Oliver.  He married Elizabeth Hilliard in 1905 and they had two children, Ivy and Gordon.

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Family Notices. (1934, March 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 13. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10917287

Family Notices. (1934, March 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 13. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10917287

Family Notices. (1940, June 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12469954

Family Notices. (1940, June 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12469954

Now to the Bishops and another Harman link as my gg grandparents were Reuben James Harman and Elizabeth Bishop.

The following headstone belongs to Charles Bishop and his wife Sarah Dancer.  Charles (1856-1916) was the eldest son of James Bishop and Sarah Hughes.  He was the brother of Elizabeth Bishop.

Charles married Sarah Dancer in 1884 and they had 11 children.  Frances Bishop Hylard was their ninth child, born in 1900.  She married Edward Thomas Hylard in 1920.

IMG_1824Charles Bishop passed away from a heart attack while loading wood.

COUNTRY NEWS. (1916, August 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 9. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1598956

COUNTRY NEWS. (1916, August 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1598956

Percy Almond Bishop was the second son of Charles and Sarah Bishop.  Percy was born in 1888 at Byaduk and enlisted in 1916 at Hamilton and served with the 39th Battalion.  He was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal and a Military Medal.  Percy never married.

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Family Notices. (1946, May 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 2. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22250486

Family Notices. (1946, May 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 2. Retrieved March 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22250486

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Ian Marr’s website, Cemeteries of S.W. Victoria has a full list of the headstones at the Byaduk Cemetery.

**Thank you to Maria Cameron, President of the Port Fairy Genealogical Society for providing with me additional information on the Fraser family and correcting an oversight I had made on the parentage of Simon Fraser.


Christmas 1940s style

Christmas during wartime 1940s was bleak especially when Japan entered as National security and economic precautions came into force.  Still, there were many eager volunteers to make sure that Christmas was cheery for all, even the Australians  fighting overseas.

Preparations for Christmas 1940 started early, as volunteers packed parcels bound for overseas troops.

3HA CLUB. (1940, August 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64397250

3HA CLUB. (1940, August 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64397250

Over 800 people attended a pantomime “A Year in the Navy” at the Horsham Town Hall.

SUCCESSFUL CHRISTMAS PANTOMIME. (1940, December 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73155556

SUCCESSFUL CHRISTMAS PANTOMIME. (1940, December 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73155556

The Australian Women’s Weekly issue of December 21, 1940 featured a fancy Christmas dinner menu.

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CHRISTMAS DINNER. (1940, December 21). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 37 Section: The Homemaker. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47244840

CHRISTMAS DINNER. (1940, December 21). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 37 Section: The Homemaker. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47244840

Noradjuha school children received a treat with a visit from Father Christmas after their Christmas concert performance.

NORADJUHA. (1940, December 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73155694

NORADJUHA. (1940, December 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73155694

The message of “Peace on Earth” returned to the newspapers.

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The Christmas Message. (1940, December 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73155682

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WW2 saw the return of Christmas hampers and in August 1941 volunteers were again donating goods, baking puddings or packing.  Simple items were in the hampers but a soldier in the trenches would have been grateful for a tin of fruit salad on Christmas day.

 

GOODS TO GO IN CHRISTMAS HAMPERS. (1941, August 26). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26547914

GOODS TO GO IN CHRISTMAS HAMPERS. (1941, August 26). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26547914

Miss Harrison’s shop in Camperdown displayed hampers packed ready for dispatch.

CHRISTMAS HAMPERS FOR OVERSEAS MEN. (1941, September 2). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26548028

CHRISTMAS HAMPERS FOR OVERSEAS MEN. (1941, September 2). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26548028

An initiative of the State branch of the Returned Soldiers League saw  Horsham children that had fathers fighting overseas, receive a Christmas party in 1941.  A nice touch was that each father received a letter to tell them of their children’s treat.

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CHRISTMAS PARTY FOR DIGGERS’ CHILDREN. (1941, October 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72696036

The Federal Treasure urged employers to give their staff War savings certificates or stamps for Christmas 1941 to support the war effort.

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES AS CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1941, November 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72697527

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES AS CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1941, November 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72697527

The Williamstown Chronicle of December 19, 1941 said “Merry Christmas” to one and all.

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Christmas !. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713662

Christmas !. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713662

Parents had to choose between peaceful toys and war  toys in 1941.  Tanks, submarines and planes increased in number on the toy shop shelves and hats, balls and drums carried patriotic logos.

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Toyland is Divided Over War and Peace. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713661

Toyland is Divided Over War and Peace. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713661

Mother always considers Dad’s interests when buying a gift, such as golf clubs or fishing rods, but does Dad think that she may also like a hobby.  Don’t blow the budget though!

GIVE MOTHER A GIFT THAT WILL AID HER HOBBY. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713714

GIVE MOTHER A GIFT THAT WILL AID HER HOBBY. (1941, December 19). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: Greetings Our Christmas Supplement. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70713714

Wartime saw a raft of new regulations imposed on citizens and Christmas was not exempt.

SHORT HOLIDAY PERIOD OVER CHRISTMAS. (1941, December 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698208

SHORT HOLIDAY PERIOD OVER CHRISTMAS. (1941, December 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698208

Jack Watts of Horsham,  stationed in Malaya over Christmas 1941 wrote home of his Christmas experience.   The nurses of the AIF held an entertaining cocktail party.

CHRISTMAS DINNER ENJOYí. (1942, January 16). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698798

CHRISTMAS DINNER ENJOYí. (1942, January 16). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698798

The work of the Red Cross was often reported on during the 1940s.  On this occasion, they were sending 72,000 Christmas boxes to British prisoners across Europe.

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS TO GERMANY. (1942, January 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698955

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS TO GERMANY. (1942, January 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72698955

Private T.M. Holmes of Gorae had a welcome break from stew and rice for Christmas 1941, spent in the Middle East.  A dinner of ham, turkey and plum duff was served by officers while the rank and file gave orders.

Les Hutchins spent Christmas in a hospital in Palestine and was grateful for his Red Cross parcel and the work of the nursing sisters to make sure Christmas for the patients was as happy as possible.

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LETTER FROM OVERSEAS. (1942, February 2). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64378749

LETTER FROM OVERSEAS. (1942, February 2). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64378749

Christmas 1942,  and attention had moved from Europe and the Middle East to closer to home.  Troops were in New Guinea and family could send mail until November 15

Christmas Mail for New Guinea. (1942, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382762

Christmas Mail for New Guinea. (1942, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382762

New restrictions were in place  during 1942 and again Christmas was under the spotlight.   Santa was given the year off.

ADVERTISING RESTRICTIONS. (1942, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382744

ADVERTISING RESTRICTIONS. (1942, November 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382744

Printers kept a keen eye out for Christmas terms on their print jobs out of  fear of a £100 fine and/or six months imprisonment.

PRINTER'S PITFALLS. (1942, November 26). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382890

PRINTER’S PITFALLS. (1942, November 26). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64382890

Advertisements were strictly censored as were motion pictures, signs, leaflets,  hoardings and more.

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING. (1942, November 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72706611

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING. (1942, November 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72706611

Traders were not allowed to employ staff specifically for Christmas trade but boys and girls could be used to free up the adult workforce for war related work.

CHRISTMAS TRADE. (1942, December 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64383060

CHRISTMAS TRADE. (1942, December 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64383060

Many would have been thankful for the double Christmas tea issue of 1942.

CHRISTMAS TEA ISSUE. (1942, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72706817

CHRISTMAS TEA ISSUE. (1942, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72706817

If Australian residents did not know what austerity was before WW2, they sure did by the end.  The country tightened its belt.  Not only that, a shortage of toys, sweets and books limited shopping. Shoppers opted for practical gifts,  ties and handkerchiefs.

HORSHAM'S AUSTERITY CHRISTMAS. (1943, January 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103254

HORSHAM’S AUSTERITY CHRISTMAS. (1943, January 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103254

Private Alfred Mitchell, formerly of Horsham, wrote a letter of thanks to Mr Crouch of Murtoa for the hamper he donated for Christmas 1942.  Alf. received  goodies including a tin of cream, dried fruit cake, tooth paste, chocolate, tobacco and kool mints.

As was the norm, Alf and the other members of his unit gave their puddings to the cooks to heat.

Christmas Hamper Appreciated. (1943, February 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103694

Christmas Hamper Appreciated. (1943, February 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103694

At the Horsham Methodist Church during December 1943, the congregation enjoyed the story of the nativity,  prayers for the King, Prime Minister and Winston Churchill and hymns.  The evening finished with a solo of “O Holy Night” by Mrs Wallace.   Christmas lilies, white gladioli, ivy and cyprus decorated the church.

Similar evenings were held at the St John’s Church of England and St Andrew’s Presbyterian church, also in Horsham.

CHRISTMAS MUSIC IN CHURCHES. (1943, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73108233

CHRISTMAS MUSIC IN CHURCHES. (1943, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73108233

The Australian Comforts Fund packed over 400,000 hampers for New Guinea and beyond during Christmas 1943.

Christmas Hampers for Troops. (1943, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64387758

Christmas Hampers for Troops. (1943, December 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64387758

 

Christmas 1944 saw a promise of better toys.  Limited materials and labour had reduced the quality during the war period.

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Christmas Toys may Improve. (1944, August 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11358186

Christmas Toys may Improve. (1944, August 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11358186

 

Portland people were getting behind the Lord Mayor’s appeal to send toys to Britain for Christmas 1944.

TOYS FOR BRITAIN. (1944, September 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64390532

TOYS FOR BRITAIN. (1944, September 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64390532

 

Cecile Besnard of Olinda won first prize in the 1944 Argus plum pudding recipe contest with a Creole Coffee pudding

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New Christmas Pudding Idea. (1944, November 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11371169

New Christmas Pudding Idea. (1944, November 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11371169

Christmas Decorations. (1944, December 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 10. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11375480

Christmas Decorations. (1944, December 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11375480

 

Despite the Japanese surrender, Christmas hampers were still in great demand for Christmas 1945.

Christmas Hampers. (1945, September 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64405473

Christmas Hampers. (1945, September 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64405473

Children that could not remember a Christmas before the war looked forward to celebrating a “real” Christmas in 1945.  Santa was back and made in-store appearances.  Sadly the toys were still inferior and the dolls thought ugly enough to scare little girls.

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Children To Have Real Christmas. (1945, November 14). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 10. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12153002

Children To Have Real Christmas. (1945, November 14). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12153002

Gift suggestion articles were back as retailers got back into the swing of Christmas trading.  Dad could expect a brush, socks or even a wool dressing gown worth 44/6 and 8 coupons.  If mum was a smoker, maybe a lipstick shaped lighter or for something different, why not a shower curtain?

Give Them for Christmas—. (1945, December 11). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 7. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12157846

Give Them for Christmas—. (1945, December 11). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 7. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12157846

Gas was in short supply in 1945 as was poultry and ham.  On the bright side dried fruits, almonds and holly sprigs were back.

CHRISTMAS PROBLEMS FOR THE HOUSEWIFE. (1945, December 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 12. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12159361

CHRISTMAS PROBLEMS FOR THE HOUSEWIFE. (1945, December 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12159361

After years of penny-pinching and low-key Christmas days,  shoppers were out in force in 1945.

1940aaa

PEOPLE BUYING HEAVILY FOR CHRISTMAS. (1945, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12159834

PEOPLE BUYING HEAVILY FOR CHRISTMAS. (1945, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12159834

Toys were plentiful, but English mechanical toys were in limited supply and beach toys were unobtainable.

CHRISTMAS TOYS PLENTIFUL. (1946, October 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 18. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22390326

CHRISTMAS TOYS PLENTIFUL. (1946, October 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 18. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22390326

Carols By candlelight was growing in popularity, so the Horsham City Council decided to introduce their own for Christmas 1946.  May Park was the proposed venue.

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT. (1946, December 10). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73080615

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT. (1946, December 10). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73080615

POULTRY SALES. (1946, December 16). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 4 Edition: Afternoons.. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65438306

POULTRY SALES. (1946, December 16). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 4 Edition: Afternoons.. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65438306

Christmas was brighter in Australia, but in Britain the situation was still grim.  Gifts of food could be left at the Camperdown branch of the Red Cross in Manifold Street.

1940oo

Christmas Food For Britain. (1947, December 15). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 1 Edition: Afternoons.. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65243667

Christmas Food For Britain. (1947, December 15). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 1 Edition: Afternoons.. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65243667

Was this the beginning of what used to be almost annual event?  Brewery workers went on strike just before Christmas 1947.

CHRISTMAS BEER HOW ASSURED. (1947, December 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 1. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22529758

CHRISTMAS BEER HOW ASSURED. (1947, December 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 1. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22529758

The Red Cross provided transport for patients at the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital to return home for Christmas 1947.  Trucks, cars and ambulances drove patients to towns such as Dunkeld, Port Fairy, Colac and Terang.

AT HOME FOR CHRISTMAS. (1948, January 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73087674

AT HOME FOR CHRISTMAS. (1948, January 20). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73087674

The Australian Women’s Weekly had personal gift giving ideas and a new cook book offer in their December 4, 1948 issue.

Our cookery book will make a wonderful Christmas gift. (1948, December 4). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 34. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51389595

Our cookery book will make a wonderful Christmas gift. (1948, December 4). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 34. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51389595

DIGGER DOINGS. (1948, December 31). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73093199

DIGGER DOINGS. (1948, December 31). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73093199

Father Christmas arrived on a bike for the Portland Kindergarten play-group Christmas party.

CHRISTMAS TREE. (1949, January 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64417285

CHRISTMAS TREE. (1949, January 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64417285

Radio 3HA ran a hospital appeal on Christmas day 1948 and due to its success, repeated it in 1949.

Xmas Radio Appeal for Hospitals. (1949, December 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64420168

Xmas Radio Appeal for Hospitals. (1949, December 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64420168

December.  What a month!

1940ggg

Editorial. (1949, December 3). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 18. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51594508

Editorial. (1949, December 3). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 18. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51594508

The December 17,  1949 issue of the Australian Women’s Weekly had recipes for Almond Snowballs and Chocolate date log and Christmas table presentation ideas.

Christmas. (1949, December 17). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 53. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51600533

Christmas. (1949, December 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 53. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51600533

 

The Argus also had Christmas table hints and a recipe for Rabbit pâté.

Your Christmas Table. (1949, December 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: The Argus Woman's Magazine. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22799645

Your Christmas Table. (1949, December 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: The Argus Woman’s Magazine. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22799645

 

Horsham traders were not experiencing a Christmas rush in 1949 and cooler weather had slowed the sale of summer clothing.  Barnetts, however, saw a rush on that ever popular Christmas gift, handkerchiefs.  Men’s dressing gowns were also selling well.

NO CHRISTMAS BUYING RUSH BUT TRADING IS STEADY. (1949, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103040

NO CHRISTMAS BUYING RUSH BUT TRADING IS STEADY. (1949, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73103040


W is for…What Else Could It Be?

Naturally I had to rejoin the Gould Genealogy Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge at “W”.  W is for Western District and that means a lot to me not only because this blog is called “Western District Families”.  I was born and raised in the Western District and all the families of my maternal lines, going back six generations, chose to settle in the wonderful Western District.

One of the highlights of the Western District is the geography.  Entering from the east, the Western Plains lead to the rise of the Grampians and on to the volcanic plains and green rolling hills beyond.  To the south are the forests of the Otways, the south-west coastline and volcanic Tower Hill .

I will take you on a geographical journey through the Western District, just a glimpse really, beginning with two colonial artists, Nicholas Chevalier and my favourite, Eugene Von Guerard.  These  artists and others, traipsed around Victoria sketching and painting.  Von Guerard also travelled to Tasmania, New South Wales, South Australia and New Zealand.  Looking at their paintings reminds me of the lives they lived for the sake of their art.

Chevalier’s sketch shows the Serra Range including Mt Sturgeon and Mt Abrupt at the southern end of the Grampians.

View of the Grampians, Western District [art original] N. Chevalier.
State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/100967

Moving south-west, dormant volcano Mt Eccles near Macarthur has played a part in my family history.  My gg grandfather Reuben James Harman, son of James Harman, owned property at Mt Eccles.  It was also a favourite fishing spot of my grandfather William Gamble.

Crater of Mt. Eccles, von Guerard, Eugene,1811-1901,artist.
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/46307

I prefer von Guerard’s depiction of Lake Surprise, the crater lake of Mt Eccles, to my own (below).  I remember as a child asking about the name “Lake Surprise”.  The answer:  When you get to the top of the crater and see the lake, you get a surprise.  Fair enough.

LAKE SURPRISE, MT ECCLES CRATER LAKE

A little north of Mt Eccles is the volcanic lava flow, the Harman Valley at Byaduk, named after my Harman family.  In the distance is the source of the lava, Mount Napier.

THE HARMAN VALLEY, BYADUK

To the south-east is Tower Hill, another dormant volcano.  It lies between Warrnambool and Port Fairy.

TOWER HILL

Further south is the famous Loch Ard Gorge, named for the Loch Ard which wrecked on the treacherous coastline.  The only two survivors, Tom Pearce and Eva Carmichael were washed on to the beach at Loch Ard Gorge.

I find standing on the beach in the Gorge a haunting experience.

LOCH ARD GORGE

East along the coast line is one of the most iconic views, not only of Victoria, but Australia.

THE 12 APOSTLES

North-west, and back where we started, are the Grampians.

HALLS GAP, GRAMPIANS

The Grampians are a perfect place to leave the subject of the Western District and move on to another “W” which has been a part of my family since the 1860s, the Wannon River…

W is for…Wannon River

The Wannon River begins its’ flow at the base of Mt Abrupt in the Southern Grampians.  It flows toward Dunkeld, around the base of Mt Sturgeon and leaves the Grampians heading north-west toward Cavendish. Along the way it passes by Mokanger , workplace of both the Mortimers and Haddens.  Through Cavendish, it passes close to the cemetery, burial place of members of those two families.

From Cavendish, the river begins a southward journey toward two of the Hamilton district’s jewels, the Nigretta and Wannon waterfalls.  As the river progresses west, the Grange Burn joins the Wannon, having flowed from just east of Hamilton, the city founded on the Grange.  This section of the river was another favourite fishing spot of my grandfather William Gamble.

On the river flows to Tahara and then Sandford. I have family links to Sandford with Julia Harman, daughter of James Harman residing there with her husband George Holmes.  Two children were born their including WW1 casualty Arthur Leonard Holmes.  My gg uncle William Diwell also spent some time around Sandford.  In 1914, he completed extensions to the St Marys Church.

The Wannon River then joins the another great river of the Western District, the Glenelg River, having passed through some of Victoria’s most beautiful countryside.  It is not surprising Joseph Hawdon, travelling overland to Adelaide with Lieutenant Alfred Miller Mundy of the 21st Regiment in 1839, endorsed Major Thomas Mitchell’s description five years earlier. Major Mitchell followed the Glenelg River from its’ beginnings in the Grampians through to the sea at Nelson. It is little wonder all of my direct ancestors stayed in the Western District after settlement.

(1839, September 26). Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 – 1846), p. 1 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT. Retrieved October 11, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8723904

After the merge with the Wannon, the Glenelg flows on to Casterton where I have many family links.  My ggg grandfather George Jelly, father of Elizabeth Ann Jelly, was one man who could say he had conquered the river.  His obituary read:

“He was a remarkably good swimmer and by his abilities in this direction was instrumental in saving many persons from drowning and rescuing the bodies of many others who had perished in the river” 

He even dived for the bones of Robert and Mary Hunt, murdered by George Wains in 1860.

By the time the Glenelg River reaches the sea, it, the Wannon and Grange Burn have passed by many of the places my ancestors lived, worked, fished, swam and were laid to rest.

The Wannon River between the Nigretta Falls and the Wannon Falls, about 20 kilometres from Hamilton, would be the section most frequented by myself and my family before me.  My own memories come from family visits, Sunday drives with Nana, school excursions and birthday parties.

The following views near the Wannon Falls are from the State Library of Victoria Collection and were captured around 1878 by  Thomas J. Washbourne , a Geelong photographer.

Wannon River Scene – Washbourne, Thomas J. photographer.Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Victorian Patents Office Copyright Collection (VPOCC) http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/53092

Wannon River Scene Washbourne, Thomas J.,photographer.
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria – Victorian Patents Office Copyright Collection (VPOCC) http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/52931

THE WANNON RIVER AT THE WANNON FALLS

Of the two waterfalls, I prefer the Nigretta, especially after rain.  The Wannon Falls could be described as pretty in the way they drop off the edge, but the Nigretta Falls are, at times, spectacular.

Nigretta Falls on the Wannon River
Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria – collection: Cogger album of photographs http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/41740

The Vagabond (John Stanley James) described the Nigretta Falls in his series “Picturesque Victoria” which appeared in The Argus.  In the  April 4, 1885 edition of The Argus , The Vagabond wrote of his visit to the Wannon.  He enjoyed the hospitality at the Wannon Inn and then marveled at the “miniature Niagara”

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1885, April 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved October 11, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6073697

This photo taken in August this year by my friend Catherine, after good rain, sees the Nigretta looking like the minature Niagara Falls as described by The Vagabond.

NIGRETTA FALLS – Image courtesy of Catherine Huisman

It was pleasing to see that the old viewing platforms still remain at the Nigretta Falls.

NIGRETTA FALLS VIEWING PLATFORM

An impressive wooden staircase now leads down to the falls, but the original steps remain.

The Wannon Falls (below) holds memories of walking beyond the viewing platform, down to the rocks and behind the falls, but only when they were flowing lightly as they are in this photo.  A new viewing platform now prevents such precarious escapades, even undertaken while on school excursions!

I have two framed prints of the Wannon Falls by Louis Buveot, painted in 1872.  One hangs on a wall as a constant reminder of Hamilton, the Wannon River and the waterfalls.  The original hangs in the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery. To see  the original click on the link – Wannon Falls

The topic of the Wannon River gives me an opportunity to share my all time favourite family photos.  As a little girl when I first saw Nana’s old photo album, these photos captured my imagination.  When Nana came to live with us she kept her photo albums in her wardrobe. I would take them down, sit on her bed and go straight to this photo.  It was near the beginning of the album which had black, much turned pages.

From right: Nana, (Linda Hadden), my great-grandmother (Sarah Elizabeth Harman) and my great auntie Alma’s (Nana’s sister) mother-in-law Mrs Issac William Short (Catherine Gissane Tilley).

They are standing on the original lower viewing deck.   The four photos from a day at the Wannon where originally very small.  It wasn’t until I enlarged them on a computer, that I noticed Nana’s coat hanging on the railing.

I think the reason I like this photo is because Nana looked exactly liked she did when I knew her, but with long braids and I still can’t believe she was only about 15.  Even the small research assistant thought Nana was the lady in the middle when he first saw it.  He only knew her as an older person and does not think of her as having been a child too.

The second photo was taken from the lower viewing deck, looking toward the upper level.  I didn’t like standing here as a child and as you can see the rail was high at the front  and difficult to see over and to the right of  Nana was a gap between the fence and the rocks.  I much preferred the lower deck.

Recent years have seen a rotunda built at the Wannon Falls reserve with information about the waterfall, the local geography and history.

On our visit, the small research assistant said “Look Mum, they even have family history here for you”  He was right. There is a lot of my family history at the Wannon Falls.


In The News – August 28, 1916

The news of August 28, 1916 was typical of the time.  It was two years into WW1, with the Battle of Fromelles  in July and then Pozieres . By the end of August, Australians were fighting at Moquet Farm, France.  Newspapers were full of war news, departures and casualties and the Portland Guardian of August 28, 1916 was no different.

Mrs Thomson of Lower Cape Bridgewater had heard the news her son Private G.E. Thomson was wounded in France.  Families of the 37th, 38th and 40th Battalions were able to send their parcels for the front to 380 Bourke Street, Melbourne.  The parcels were then forwarded to the various Battalions at a cost of one penny per pound.

The Portland Guardian. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 24, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015692

I would like to think this next article was about my 1st cousins 3 x removed, Frederick James and Arthur Leonard Holmes (aka Lennie) of Casterton.  However, while Arthur was still in Australia, not embarking until October 21, 1916 , Fred was in France and wounded by this time.

I searched the WW1 Embarkation Roll and Mapping our Anzacs trying to identify the two Holmes boys, presumably brothers. The venue of the social was not mentioned in the Editorial, so I assumed it was in Portland.  The closest I found was Frederick Noah Holmes of Wallacedale and Leslie Holmes of Homerton via Heywood, however Leslie embarked on August 1.

The Haines family from idyllic Sandy Waterhole on the Glenelg River, received  news of theirs son’s passing as a result of wounds.

The Mulholland family of Portland also received bad news from France.

I hope Mrs Carnie got her letters from the front.

Mrs Newman of “Ulymah” Gawler Street Portland, was doing her part for the war effort.  She was the Portland contact for Mr Herbert Daly, an Australian in Paris.  Herbert was collecting socks for those displaced by war, particularly old men.

Newly re-elected Portland Mayor Mr Wyatt received a letter from local boy W.H.J.Baker, serving in France.  Corporal Baker mentions “France is such a beautiful place” and “No wonder Germany wants this beautiful country”.  Read the letter in full here.

On Active Service. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015700

Corporal Baker enclosed some of his poetry with the letter.  Read the full poem here.

Australian Sons in Egypt. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015713

Back in Portland, which must have felt a million miles away from the war, unsettled weather prevailed.

The Portland Guardian. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015692

 

Wattle Day ,on September 1, was fast approaching.  The first Wattle Day was in 1910 and the outbreak of war saw the day celebrated with extra vigour.

 

The Portland Guardian. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015692

Canadian born silent screen star Mary Pickford was appearing in “The Dawn of Tomorrow” at the Portland Pictures.

QUEENS OF THE FILM. (1916, April 29). The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889, 1914 – 1918), p. 5. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74834158

As mentioned,  Cr James Lewis Wyatt was unanimously re-elected Mayor of Portland.  He was Mayor from August 1914 to August 1917.

[No heading]. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page6068639

Victorians, along with the other states, were preparing for their first dose of Daylight Savings.  The timing was not exactly how the Act had set out. Clocks went forward on January 1, 1917 and back on March 25, 1917.  Daylight Savings did not occur again until WW2 with the years of1942-3 and 1943-4  each having an extra hour of daylight at the end of the day.

The Portland Guardian. (1916, August 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64015692

In 1914, the Duke of Portland of England, announced that the skeleton of racehorse Carbine would return to Australia for the National Museum.  The following article, two years later, announced the skeleton was ready for shipping to Australia.  Finally in December 1919, the skeleton was ready to leave England, arriving in February the following year.

I have seen the skeleton of Carbine at the former Racing Museum at Caulfield Racecourse and its current home at the National Sports Museum at the MCG.   While standing beside Carbine’s skeleton is not as moving as visiting Phar Lap at Melbourne Museum, it is still an imposing sight.

A video of Carbine’s skeleton being reconstructed when it moved to the National Sports Museum can be seen at the link  – http://tinyurl.com/8w4w5pv


M is for…Methodist

This really should have been a post for the “W” week of the Gould Genealogy Alphabet challenge, but I have another “W” word in mind for that week (guess which word that will be).  To be precise,  “W is for…Wesleyan Methodist” would have been more apt as it is the branch of Methodism that the Harman family followed, but due to an overload of “W”‘s, I’ll turn it upside down and make it “M is for…Methodist”.

What did I know about Methodism before I discovered the Harman’s faith?  Nothing except for a link to temperance.  Therefore, over the years I have tried to find out more about the religion as I think it is definitive in finding out more of what the Harmans were really like, especially James and his brother Walter who were Local Preachers with the church.

It was the role of  local preacher that I discovered was one of the characteristics of Methodism.  This from the “Advocate” of Burnie on August 16, 1952 gives something of the background:

The Methodist Local Preacher. (1952, August 16). Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 – 1954), p. 12. Retrieved August 6, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article69442373

I have also found that James did preach at Hamilton Methodist Church on occasions, found in the history  Uniting we now stand : a history of the Hamilton Methodist Church  by Joan A. Smith (1999).  The Hamilton church was originally at 41 McIntyre Street before moving to Lonsdale Street in 1913.  In May this year a gathering was held recognising 150 years of Methodism in Hamilton.

The Byaduk Methodist Church built 1864, was the first church in the town and a weatherboard Sunday School was added in 1889.  Located on the Hamilton/Port Fairy Road which runs through the town the Byaduk church, along with the Hamilton church,  are now Uniting Churches.  This cam about after three churches, the Methodist, Presbyterian and Congregational came together in 1977.

FORMER BYADUK METHODIST CHURCH

Prior to the Byaduk church’s construction services were held in the home of John B. Smith, an early leader of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Victoria.   In 1866, Smith went to Portland  and travelled a circuit which took him throughout the south-west.  His recollections were published in The Portland Guardian of June 25, 1928.  If you have Kittson, Lightbody or Hedditch links, this is worth reading in full.

Early Methodsim. (1928, June 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved August 6, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64266132

Smith was also a co-author of the book The Early Story of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Victoria  available online.  Of course there is a lot in the book about John Smith himself who “.. had a clear grasp of the plan of salvation, and a touching and pathetic way of speaking of the “wrath to come”.”(p.269).

Also of Smith:

“The well-worn family Bible used morning, noon, and night for family worship, told of his love for the Psalms and the words of the Lord Jesus and few could use them (even the deep vast words of the fourth gospel), or the plaintive phrases of the Psalms, or the less familiar lines of shaded beauty found in our Hymn Book, with greater feeling and effect” (p269)

The influence of this holy man of God and of other kindred spirits make Byaduk a bright spot in the Hamilton Circuit, while the personal worth and , social standing of Mr. Peter Learmonth as a Christian and a citizen, and the active sympathy and generous help of the Wissins’ and Learmonths’ on the one hand, and the uno-rudsins labours of devoted Local Preachers on the other, have served to sustain the cause and comfort the Minister’s heart”(p270)

Peter Fraser in Early Byaduk Settlers, describes an early Methodist service at Byaduk:

“They conducted the services differently from now.  In singing hymns. the preacher read a verse and the congregation sang the verse, then he read another and the congregation sang it and so on to the end of the hymn.  In prayers, most of the congregation knelt; and when the preacher was praying, some in the congregation would sing out AMEN, BE IT SO HALLELUIAH and other words, while others in the congregation would grunt and groan all the time, but it must have been a nuisance to the preacher as the Methodist Ministers stopped it many years ago.” (p. 14)

Peter also names some of the local preachers of which there was an abundance.  They included Mr John Henry Oliver senior, father-in-law of Jonathon and Reuben Harman, and his son John Henry junior.  Also Daniel Love, John Holmes and Samuel Clarke, just to name a few.  George Holmes senior, father in law of Julia Harman, was superintendent of the Sunday School for over 40 years.

James and Walter seemed the most devout of the Harman family, with both spreading the word as local preachers. Also, Walter and his wife Lydia established the Sunday School at Ensay and Walter travelled many miles preaching.  Walter’s son Henry was an elder of the Omeo Methodist Church and I have previously told the story of the Omeo Methodist Minister Ronald Griggs .  The church closed ranks around Griggs and continued to support him at the time of his murder trial in 1928.

The post In Search of the Extraordinary Monster looks at the Port Fairy Methodist church.  Port Fairy was the home of the Harman family before they moved to Byaduk

Reuben James Harman, son of James and my gg grandfather,  was buried in the Methodist section of the Ballarat New Cemetery, with the faith continuing on to the next generation.

GRAVE OF REUBEN JAMES HARMAN & EMMA LORDEN – BALLARAT NEW CEMETERY

I know there is so much more to find about the Harman family link to the Wesleyan Methodist Church.  My ggg grandfather was a great servant of the church and saw some changes during its development in Byaduk and Hamilton.   He was still alive when the Hamilton Methodist Church moved to Lonsdale Street, but  a major change occurred a year after his death.  In 1917, the Methodist Church of Australia at its Melbourne conference ruled that local preachers were to become known as lay preachers.

METHODIST CONFERENCE. (1917, May 26). Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954), p. 6 Edition: DAILY. Retrieved August 7, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50927004

A post on the website Gospel Australia, has a great post “Poor Old Tom Brown”.  I have included the link but now the site is only working intermittently.   It  describes a man who was a Local Preacher in New South Wales and he is very much how I imagine James Harman to have been.

If you have Western District family  who were Methodists, I highly recommend you read the The Early Story of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Victoria.  Various towns throughout the Western District were represented along with many names.  Other areas of Victoria are also covered.

If any one has any idea how I can get a copy of  Uniting we now stand : a history of the Hamilton Methodist Church  I would love to hear from you.  There is a copy in the reference section of the Hamilton Library but it would be nice to have a copy of my own.

There is one question about the Harmans and their Methodist faith that I may never have answered.  Why did Joseph Harman, father of James and Walter, change his religion from Methodist to Presbyterian by the time of his death in 1893?  Mentioned in his obituary in “The Hamilton Spectator” it has had me wondering ever since I first read it.

 


Hobbies, Passions and Devotions

The activities of my ancestors outside of their usual occupation is always of interest to me.  Their sports, pastimes, hobbies and social activities often help define them as people and sometimes those activities are present in later generations.  Also, it can lead to further information from club records and results in newspapers.

In some cases, much spare time was devoted to the church, maybe on the committee such as William Hadden or as a lay preacher like James Harman.  James was also able to find time for his other passion, ploughing competitions, not mention various committees, such as the local school.

Richard Diwell had an interest in the Hamilton Horticulture Society, but also indulged in photography. The photo in the post Elizabeth Ann Jelly was one of Richard’s using a camera with a timer, a new development in photography at the turn of the century.

My grandfather, Bill Gamble, grandson of Richard Diwell, had many interests particularly before he married.  He played cornet with the Hamilton Brass band and was a committee member of the Hamilton Rifle Club and a state representative shooter.

He also loved fishing, motorcycles and like his grandfather before him, photography.  As a result we now have hundreds of photographs of motorbikes and fishing trips.  He even developed his own photographs.  His passions of photography and motorcycles were passed on to his son Peter.

Many of the Holmes and Diwell families were members of Brass Bands at Casterton and Hamilton.  Alfred Winslow Harman was a rifle shooter and I recently told you about Nina Harman, wiling away the hours completing tapestry carpets.

I recently found an activity which previously hadn’t been present in my family, greyhound breeding.

James Stevenson was the grandson of James Mortimer and Rosanna Buckland. He worked as a manager at “Hyde Park”  a squatting run north of Cavendish until it was split up in 1926 for the Soldier Settlement scheme.  After this James moved to “Glen Alvie” at Cavendish where he described himself as a grazier.

In 1927, he advertised five well-bred greyhound pups for sale.  At £4 each, he stood to earn £20 if he successfully sold them.  A seemingly profitable hobby indeed.

Advertising. (1927, February 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved June 15, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73082854

James would have needed a good return on his pups as the sire’s stud fees would have been pricey given Cinder was imported by successful breeder, Mr Dickie of Bacchus Marsh.  The article from the time of Cinder’s arrival in Australia in 1923, reports the dog remained in quarantine for six months.  Because of a rabies outbreak in England, there was an extension to the time spent in quarantine  only a short time before his arrival.

In 1927, the time of James’ advertisement, greyhound racing using a “mechanical hare” began for the first time at the Epping course in New South Wales.  It took longer for other states to adopt the “tin hare” where they continued with the traditional field coursing.

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. (1923, September 7). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), p. 6. Retrieved June 19, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65041056

 

WHAT DID YOUR ANCESTORS DO IN THEIR SPARE TIME?


The 2012 ANZAC Day Blog Challenge

My third post for Western District Families was in April last year for the 2011 ANZAC Day Blog Challenge.  My contribution was the story of Arthur Leonard Holmes of Casterton, gassed in France in 1918.

Recently, while researching the Holmes family at  Trove  for another reason, I found a couple more items about “Lennie” and his sad death .  I have since updated his post.

Well, it is April again and with ANZAC Day drawing closer it is time to start thinking about  the 2012 ANZAC Day Blog Challenge.

Created by the  Auckland City Libraries, the Anzac Day Blog Challenge gives us a chance to share stories of our family members who served during wartime and remember their contribution to our life in both Australia and New Zealand today.

The criteria, from the Auckland City Libraries website, is as follows:

Do you have a story to share about an ANZAC? We’d like to hear about not only their sacrifice, but the way it shaped their family history. Maybe you want to blog from the perspective of those that were left behind?

To participate:

  • Write a blog post about an Australian or New Zealander serviceman or woman’s family, and the impact war had on their family history
  • Post a comment with the URL to your blog on the comments section of this page. Or if you don’t have a blog then email us your story at kintalk@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz
  • Publish your post by 25 April 2012.

After ANZAC Day, all submissions will be listed in a summary posting on Auckland Libraries’ Kintalk blog.

Time to get started, but who am I going to write about??

_____________________________________________

Well, I made my decision and I wrote about the McClintock brothers.  Read their story here – “The McClintock Brothers

 

 


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