Tag Archives: Horsham

Trove Tuesday – A Frisky Pony

Trove Tuesday goes to Horsham this week with a story about a naughty pony that caused excitement in the town’s main street, Fibrace Street,  After some kicking and erratic behavior, the pony ended up facing its driver and passenger, Mrs Blight and her daughter.

A PONY'S ESCAPADE. (1909, January 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72825888

A PONY’S ESCAPADE. (1909, January 19). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72825888

The photo I found at Trove to go with the article, is a treasure.  Taken around the same period as Mrs Blight’s driving excitement, the photo shows Mary Lloyd Taylor and her two daughters in a lovely buggy drawn by a beautiful flaxen chestnut pony.

Mary Lloyd Tayler and two of her daughters in a buggy drawn by pony at "Mynda". c1890-1910.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H83.94/156 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16217

Mary Lloyd Tayler and two of her daughters in a buggy drawn by pony at “Mynda”. c1890-1910. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H83.94/156 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/16217


Trove Tuesday – High Fire Danger

This week’s Trove Tuesday post began as a story about Magic Lanterns, the early version of the film projector, and the problems they were causing in Portland in 1914.  But a reference in the article to “celluloid collars” changed the post slightly to include another unexpected fire risk to mostly men and boys of the early 20th century.

The first article comes from the Portland Guardian of October 14, 1914.  A cheap toy Magic Lantern, or more precisely the lens of the lantern, was the curse of the mother’s of Portland boys.  The lenses, probably removed for the purpose of mischief by the boys, were burning holes in their pockets.  The whistle-blower on the events, warned that if one were placed in a celluloid collar, disaster would prevail.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1914, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63970668

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1914, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63970668

That got me thinking, why were celluloid collars such a risk.  While I assumed that being made from the same material as film, they would be flammable (thanks to a recent episode of Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries for that realisation), but was the danger really that great?  A Trove search found that yes they were a danger, and sometimes in the most innocent ways.  One  headline I found was “Killed by Collar of Fire” , another “Dangers of Celluloid”.  I’ve read many accounts of the risks to ladies wearing full skirts around open fires and even sparks from buggy wheels catching an overhanging skirt, but celluloid collars, it seems, were the male equivalent.

Some Horsham children were lucky that the celluloid collar they were playing with didn’t cause more damage.

A FIRE AVERTED. (1915, June 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72974894

A FIRE AVERTED. (1915, June 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72974894

The photo below is of a Magic Lantern, but not a toy that the Portland boys had.  For the purpose of the demonstration, the photo of the Magic Lantern was taken in daylight, but darkness was necessary to view the projected images.

A Magic Lantern (1909).  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H2009.29/120 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/159294

A Magic Lantern (1909). Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2009.29/120 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/159294


Misadventures, Deaths and Near Misses

Sometimes the Misadventure, Deaths and Near Misses (MDNM) posts are like a newspaper version of Funniest Home Videos (I’m thinking of the horse in the sidecar last edition), but there is, of course, a serious side.  The accidents of Western District pioneers remind us of the dangers they faced in their everyday lives. Even mundane clothes washing could turn disastrous.

Fire was ever-present in early homes for light, cooking, warmth and washing.  That led to many injuries and women were the most likely victims simply because they worked with fire often and their long dresses were prone to catch.   My own family did not go unaffected by fire.  My ggg grandmother, Ellen Gamble, lost her life in a house fire from a knocked candle and my ggg aunt, Jane Diwell passed away after catching fire while boiling turpentine and beeswax.  Newspapers articles on the danger of fire were often published.

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What to do in [?]ase of Catching Fire. (1900, May 12). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 43. Retrieved May 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71380496

What to do in [?]ase of Catching Fire. (1900, May 12). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 – 1907), p. 43. Retrieved May 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71380496

The following ladies all had accidents with fire and for each it was their impractical dresses that contributed to their injuries.

In 1889, Jane Brennan was travelling home from mass with her husband and son, when the boy smelt smoke.  They blamed a hot axle until they found  Jane’s dress on fire.  Despite her husband’s desperate attempts to douse the flames, Jane received severe burns.  Mr Brennan also had bad burns including his fingernails burnt off.  Despite being transported to the Ararat Hospital, a later edition of The Portland Guardian reported Jane had sadly died.  The cause of the fire was unknown.

For Constance Sarah O’Connell of Heywood and Eva Dyson of Bessiebelle, it was domestic duties that resulted in their burns.  Mrs O’Connell was tending a copper in the backyard of the Commercial Hotel, Heywood where she worked, when her dress caught fire.  A doctor was called from Portland to tend Mrs O’Connell’s burns but the poor woman was sent by afternoon train to Hamilton Hospital where she later died.  I am curious why she did not go to Portland, closer than Hamilton.

Eva Dyson was carrying out her household chores in front of a fireplace when her dress caught fire.  Her screams brought her mother and sister who were able to extinguish the flames but not before they all also suffered burns.

A past edition of MDNMs discussed the frequency of headlines such as “Peculiar Accident” or “Extraordinary Death” in the papers.  The death of  Matthew Kelly of Eurambeen was definitely “extraordinary” or maybe just what can happen when a joke gets out of hand.

The Portland Guardian,. (1888, July 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63589310

The Portland Guardian,. (1888, July 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63589310

On July 25, 1888, The Portland Guardian reported that Mrs Kelly would stand trial over the manslaughter of her husband.  I did not find an article about her trial and the result.

A peculiar accident occurred at the Ararat Railway Station in 1922 and the cause was the railway bell.  A Minyip lady received stitches above her eye as a result.

A RAILWAY BELL MISHAP. (1922, November 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved May 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72741866

A RAILWAY BELL MISHAP. (1922, November 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved May 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72741866

NEAR MISSES

It was a near miss for James Hadden, my gg uncle,  working at a saw bench at Mt Sturgeon Station, near Dunkeld.  The saw went between his fingers and while he suffered some nasty cuts, his fingers remained intact.

On September 12, 1884, two “cowboys” rode up beside the mail coach between Nhill and Dimboola causing the horses to bolt.  Both the driver and the only passenger Mrs Dungey of Kaniva, were thrown from the box seat of the coach.  Fortunately they both survived but Mrs Dungey was badly injured.  The driver managed to get the coach back in order, surprisingly with the help of the two culprits.  They loaded Mrs Dungey and the driver took her to a doctor in Dimboola.  The police investigated the incident, the second of its kind in a short period.

Mr Shrive did something that still occurs regularly today.   He fell from a ladder.   Notice Mr Shrive’s accident was the third of its kind around the time of  June 1888.

HARROW. (1888, June 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72883804

HARROW. (1888, June 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72883804

A bull had the last word when  Mr D. Williams, a butcher, was attempting to slaughter it.  The beast kicked its leg out,  pushing the butcher’s knife into the lower arm of Mr Williams, inflicting a nasty wound that cut the artery.

Albert Reed of Muddy Creek was my 1st cousin, 4 x removed, a nephew of my ggg grandmother Sarah Harman (nee Reed).  He owned a cantankerous young Jersey bull that happily roamed the paddock but would not enter the cow yard.  Until one day in August 1913 when it chose to jump the fence into the cow yard where Albert was standing.  It immediately charged Albert and for sixty metres, it pushed Albert along the ground trying to lift him up onto its horns.  Finally William broke free and called for help but the only person home was his mother Sarah Burgin, then 67.  Between them they were able to secure the bull.  It was later shot.

F.Lovell of Portland had a very near miss!

ACCIDENT. (1906, September 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63963309

ACCIDENT. (1906, September 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63963309

in 1889, Reverend Father Foley was on his way home from conducting mass at Goroke when he came across John Breen .  John had fallen from a horse and had broken his leg.  Rev. Father Foley constructed splints from the bark of a tree, lifted John into his buggy and transported him to Nhill hospital.  Dr Ryan of the hospital was most impressed with the surgical skills shown by the man of the cloth.


Autumn Fashion

The first two months of Autumn in the Western District produce some of the year’s best weather.  There are warm days but a chill is felt in the night air.  By May however, we begin to get a taste of what lies ahead with more wet and cold days.

During the mid 19th century, ladies had to rely on reports from London and Paris for their fashion news.

In 1848,   the “London and Paris Ladies Magazine of Fashion” predicted coloured velvet trimmed for Autumn dresses.  Velvet was also a popular for bonnets.

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FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

Bonnets trimmed with  fruit were out for Autumn 1851, but flowers such as forget-me-nots were fashionable.  Dresses with open or short sleeves were accessorised with bracelets, emeralds and “medal” charms the suggestion.

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FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 – 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

The styles for Autumn 1853 changed little from the Spring before.

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 – 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

Sleeves were changing in shape during the mid 1850s.  Also, with the change of season, velvet was replacing ribbon on bonnets.

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4827100

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article482710

 

A sample of Autumn fashion advertisements from the 1860s.

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303
Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

L.Robinson & Co. of Collins Street, Melbourne had the latest imported Paris fashions for Autumn 1870.

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Miss S.H. Heazlewood kept the Portland ladies in the latest styles for Autumn 1884 and she offered a dress making service too.

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Not much has changed almost 130 years on.

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

In 1889, furs and cloaks were hitting the shops but outside the weather was anything but cold.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

Two weeks later,  the weather was a little more Autumn like.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

A “pretty” apron from 1892 with a handy pocket and a cheap price tag.

FASHION'S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

FASHION’S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

Colourful straw hats were in vogue for Autumn 1904.

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ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

Jeanne Paquin was a French fashion designer known for her tailored gowns.  In 1905, her influence was evident in the fashions reaching Australian shores.

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WOMAN'S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

WOMAN’S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

The following dress  from 1907, in a chiffon Panama material, gives us some idea of the sewing skills that have sadly been lost today.  Horsham ladies did not have to go to the city to buy such a dress.  They could order a Buttericks  pattern from M. Thorp & Co of Melbourne.

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LADIES' COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

LADIES’ COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

Shades of purple were popular in 1913, especially for hats and veils.

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FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

By 1914, Horsham ladies not handy with the needle were able to buy fashion equal to their city counterparts without leaving town.

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

Those that suffered for fashion’s sake, would have pleased to see the back of the tight skirt.

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

Autumn hats for 1917 had few trimmings, although the white felt hat embroidered with Greek dancing-girls sounds far from plain.

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

By the end of January 1917, autumn and winter clothing was appearing in the shops, the last thing shoppers wanted to see during a hot summer.  Coat frocks were in and the coatee was flattering for ladies of all shapes and sizes.

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WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WW1 limited the supply of precious stones for jewellery, with diamonds becoming rare and in turn expensive.  Charm bracelets and three stone engagement rings were popular and wedding rings had narrowed.  Earrings were rarely worn and when they were they were a simple stud.

Colours were of subdued tones, fitting for the times.  Suits had few trimmings, relying on a smart cut for style.

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WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

Tyler’s of Bridge Street, Ballarat. advertised in the Border Watch of Mt. Gambier a fair distance to travel in 1922 for the latest autumn fashions.

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Some distinctive 1920s styles.

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AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

There was plenty of colour on offer with the Autumn fashions of 1926, from rosewood to smoke greys and everything in between.  Imitation fur trimmings were popular on coats and handbags.

OUR WOMEN'S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

OUR WOMEN’S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

A Coolie coat from 1927.

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FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

Styles from Autumn 1934.

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The Fashion Parade. (1934, February 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 23. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46465428

Geoffrey Turton, aka Petrov, was an Australian magazine illustrator and cartoonist.  He worked on publications such as the Bulletin and Smiths Weekly, but also the Australian Women’s Weekly.  The following is an example of work from the Weekly, depicting Autumn styles from 1935.

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The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved March 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

There was plenty of choice available for Autumn 1935, with ladies able to choose the look they preferred.aut46aut47

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

Friday March 19, 1937 was the date for the opening show of E.S. Finkemeyer’s Autumn and Winter fashions.

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

Black worn with accessories in a new red, “rebel red”, was a fashionable look for 1940.

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

A promotion for Australian woollen garments during Autumn 1941.

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

A cardigan perfect for those cooler March evenings.

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

During WW2, when French and Italian fashion houses closed, America came to the forefront of fashion.

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

Sewing patterns from 1945.

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

The following two suits sure have that 1940s war-time look about them.

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman's Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman’s Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

This crêpe dress from 1950 was in contrast to the 1947 fashions, above.

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

In 1955, Tweed fashions for ladies emerged, not just tomboys, as did the jersey dress that washed like a stocking.

TWEED... is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

TWEED… is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

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The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

Max Factor cosmetics were 40 years old when this glamorous Myer advertisement appeared in the Australian Women’s Weekly.  Hollywood starlets such as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor had made red lips sexy.

Aut55

Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Christmas 1950s style

The 1950s began and Australian troops were overseas once again, in the Middle East, Malaya, Japan and Korea.   Those efforts, however did not have the same impact on the Australian way of life as  WW2 and to a slightly lesser extent, WW1.  Other happenings of the 1950s were the Melbourne Olympics, television arrived and there was a greater awareness of the U.S. culture.

The 1950s is the last decade that digitised newspapers are available at Trove so the articles do fade away toward the end of the decade, however I have supplemented Christmas 1958 and 1959 with another form of media.

Naval personnel were off Korea for Christmas 1950.  Families could send Christmas greetings by telegram.

Lodge telegrams early for Korea. (1950, December 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23020826

Lodge telegrams early for Korea. (1950, December 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23020826

 

The Portland Guardian looked back at the origins of Christmas in 1950.

CHRISTMAS IS WITH US ONCE MORE. (1950, December 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY.. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64423565

CHRISTMAS IS WITH US ONCE MORE. (1950, December 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY.. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64423565

 

At Brimpaen, Father Christmas paid a visit to the local children.  There were toys, sweets, ice-creams and soft drinks.  Other celebrations were held in the area.

Christmas Toys For Children. (1950, December 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72763523

Christmas Toys For Children. (1950, December 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72763523

 

The Australian Women’s Weekly was a great source of inspiration when preparing Christmas dinner.

1950e1950f

Christmas Buffet. (1950, December 23). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47806519

Christmas Buffet. (1950, December 23). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47806519

 

The Weekly also promoted “Buy Australian” in 1951 with some Australian made gift ideas.

AUSTRALIAN-MADE Christmas gifts. (1951, December 5). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47808540

AUSTRALIAN-MADE Christmas gifts. (1951, December 5). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47808540

 

The charitable Miss Elsie Davis of Horsham ran a penny drive in Fibrace Street to raise money for the patients of the Wimmera Base Hospital.

CHRISTMAS TREAT PENNY DRIVE TODAY. (1951, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72798806

CHRISTMAS TREAT PENNY DRIVE TODAY. (1951, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72798806

 

Langlands of Horsham had a range of toys in stock for Christmas 1951.

Advertising. (1951, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72798775

Advertising. (1951, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72798775

 

Spending Christmas on the road over Christmas was a costly experience.

CHRISTMAS DINNER WAS A REAL LUXURY. (1952, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64430580

CHRISTMAS DINNER WAS A REAL LUXURY. (1952, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64430580

Christmas Mail For Service Personnel Abroad. (1952, November 14). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24005182

Christmas Mail For Service Personnel Abroad. (1952, November 14). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article24005182

 

The Horsham Fire Brigade ran a Christmas tree and Santa arrived on the back of a truck.

FATHER CHRISTMAS ON FIRE BRIGADE. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788126

FATHER CHRISTMAS ON FIRE BRIGADE. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788126

 

Horsham shoppers planned ahead for Christmas 1952 and avoided the rush.  Sporting goods were popular gifts and one florist expected to sell 50 dozen bunches of gladioli in the two days leading up to Christmas.  More toys were  mechanised, leading to higher prices.

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1950p

SHOPPING RUSH NOT SO BAD THIS YEAR Many Doing Christmas Shopping Earlier. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788030

SHOPPING RUSH NOT SO BAD THIS YEAR Many Doing Christmas Shopping Earlier. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788030

CHRISTMAS DAY APPEAL. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788113

CHRISTMAS DAY APPEAL. (1952, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788113

 

Christmas Day, 1952 was hot in Horsham with a sweltering 97 degrees Fahrenheit (approx.  36 degrees Celsius)

Christmas Day Was 97 Degrees. (1952, December 30). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788160

Christmas Day Was 97 Degrees. (1952, December 30). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72788160

 

Heywood held Carols by Candlelight on Christmas Eve, 1952 along with the screening of “two suitable moving films”.

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT. (1953, January 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64433618

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT. (1953, January 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MIDDAY. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64433618

 

Could this have been the beginning of the Christmas Club?  Which bank?

Advertising. (1953, September 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72772846

Advertising. (1953, September 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72772846

 

For 10/5/6, parents could by the latest model Steelcraft Tricycle for their child or a wigged doll for 50/9.

1950u

Advertising. (1953, November 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72774828

Advertising. (1953, November 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72774828

 

The Australian Women’s Weekly has some home-made Christmas gift suggestions for 1953.

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1953, November 11). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47114408

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1953, November 11). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 38. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47114408

Merry Christmas. (1953, December 2). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 41. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article41080182

Merry Christmas. (1953, December 2). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 41. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article41080182

 

Corporal L.V. Eldridge of Horsham wrote a letter from Korea to the “Horsham Times” with Christmas Greetings for Horsham and district residents.

1950y1950z

Soldier Sends Christmas Greetings From Korea. (1953, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72776493

Soldier Sends Christmas Greetings From Korea. (1953, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72776493

 

Fibrace Street, Horsham was decorated with bunting and tinsel for Christmas 1953.  The toys were in abundance on the shop shelves and shoppers found they didn’t have to “pay exorbitant prices for fragile junk in the way of toys”  Interesting, plastics were the “big thing of the day”.  Given time and shoppers were bound to find that the fragile junk of the past was nothing compared to what plastic delivered.

1950bb

1950cc

SHOPS READY. (1953, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72776491

SHOPS READY. (1953, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72776491

 

The Horsham Apex club decorated a “dinkum” Christmas tree (a Norfolk pine) in the Botanic Garden for their Christmas treat for the children of Horsham.

Apex Has "Dinkum" Christmas Tree. (1954, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796148

Apex Has “Dinkum” Christmas Tree. (1954, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796148

Advertising. (1954, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796169

Advertising. (1954, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796169

 

Christmas 1954 was profitable for Horsham traders.

1950gg

Christmas Rush Was Profitable. (1954, December 31). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796586

Christmas Rush Was Profitable. (1954, December 31). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74796586

 

Variations on the Christmas tree were beginning to emerge.  I think we can blame plastic for that.

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS. (1955, December 14). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 57. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48072072

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS. (1955, December 14). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 57. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48072072

 

The 1950s were the height of the baby boom and Melbourne maternity hospitals were expecting a Christmas rush of babies.

1950kk

THERE'LL BE SCORES OF CHRISTMAS BABES JOY FOR SOME —AND TEARS. (1955, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71787632

THERE’LL BE SCORES OF CHRISTMAS BABES JOY FOR SOME —AND TEARS. (1955, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71787632

 

Troops in Japan, Malaya and Korea were given a Christmas treat.

THERE'LL BE SCORES OF CHRISTMAS BABES JOY FOR SOME —AND TEARS. (1955, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71787632

THERE’LL BE SCORES OF CHRISTMAS BABES JOY FOR SOME —AND TEARS. (1955, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 3. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71787632

 

Melbournians almost forgot Christmas 1956 due to the hype of the Olympic games in September that year.

1950nn

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1956, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71768469

CHRISTMAS GIFTS. (1956, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71768469

1950pp

1950qq

We're all too busy with the Games FATHER CHRISTMAS IS FORGOTTEN. (1956, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71768234

We’re all too busy with the Games FATHER CHRISTMAS IS FORGOTTEN. (1956, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 21, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71768234

 

Signs of the American culture filtering into the Australian psyche were evident with this Dennis the Menace cartoon from 1956 an example.

1950ss

DENNIS THE MENACE. (1956, December 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 7. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71773325

 

The 1950s also meant Elvis and the Argus shared a photo of Presley’s Christmas gift giving with his parents and Vegas chorus girls, Dorothy Harmony,

PRESENTS FOR PRESLEY... (1957, January 2). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 2. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71774164

PRESENTS FOR PRESLEY… (1957, January 2). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 2. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71774164

 

Ballarat pensioners were not forgotten over Christmas 1956.

They had a Xmas treat. (1957, January 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 7. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71774826

They had a Xmas treat. (1957, January 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 7. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71774826

 

The photo in the next article is difficult to see but it is from Penang with “burly” Company Sergent Major J. O’Sullivan, dressed as Santa, entertaining the children of Australian soldiers stationed there.

 

SANTA CLAUS IN MALAYA. (1957, December 24). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), p. 5. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91253618

SANTA CLAUS IN MALAYA. (1957, December 24). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), p. 5. Retrieved December 23, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91253618

 

The papers ran out but I was able to find the following from Film Australia about Christmas 1958 from bush to beach.

 

With the arrival of television, Christmas advertisements were able to come to life.


Christmas 1920s style

A new decade dawned with a sense of hope and positivity.  Would the decade end in the same way?

Christmas 1920 and the first example of mass marketing I have come across as I’ve  moved through the decades and it came from Kodak. The advertisements promoted Kodak cameras’ convenience which could give lasting memories of holidays long after they were past.  Even a child could use it.

1920

Advertising. (1920, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64022869

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The Salvation Army’s charity work at Christmas was attracting more attention in the papers during the 1920s.

CHRISTMAS TREATS. (1920, December 9). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64022893

CHRISTMAS TREATS. (1920, December 9). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64022893

The Portland Guardian Christmas editorial of December 23, 1920 had it all.  Christmas from a religious perspective, the need for positivity,  forward movement and encouragement to buy local products.  Industrial disputes, prominent during the 1920s in Australia are also mentioned as was Santa with the suggestion that if Santa could not  find a suitable Christmas gift in  the Portland shops, he wasn’t up to the task.  Luckily there was the clarification that Santa has been in the job too long for them to question his abilities.

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Portland Guardian. (1920, December 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64022977

Portland Guardian. (1920, December 23). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64022977

It was hot in the Western District during Christmas 1920 and this brought people out on to the streets of Heywood.

Heywood. (1921, January 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64023002

Heywood. (1921, January 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64023002

Spencer Street Station (now Southern Cross Station), Melbourne would have been a sight at Christmas time with crates of live poultry of various types lining the platforms.  This report comes from Christmas 1921.

THE CHRISTMAS GOOSE. (1921, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72727852

THE CHRISTMAS GOOSE. (1921, December 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72727852

The war was over but help was still needed by the many returned servicemen, many facing unemployment.

CHRISTMAS CHEER. (1921, December 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4611429

CHRISTMAS CHEER. (1921, December 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4611429

The ladies of the Horsham Church of Christ had gathered together homemade goods to sell at their annual Christmas sale of 1922.

SALE OF WORK. (1922, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742565

SALE OF WORK. (1922, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742565

Photographs were a popular gift suggestion for Christmas 1922.

Advertising. (1922, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742578

Advertising. (1922, December 15). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742578

Barnes the Chemist of Horsham had ivory goods and hair tidies and were also an agent for Kodak, the camera to suit all purses.

1920kHorsham experienced the coldest Christmas for years in 1922.

CHRISTMAS IN HORSHAM. (1922, December 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742806

CHRISTMAS IN HORSHAM. (1922, December 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72742806

Shoppers fell over each other to get the best Christmas poultry at the Bendigo Auction markets in December 1923.

POULTRY FOR CHRISTMAS. (1923, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72737714

POULTRY FOR CHRISTMAS. (1923, December 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7273771

As seen above, turkeys were the more expensive type of poultry for Christmas 1923 and were considered “a forbidden luxury”.

OUR CHRISTMAS DINNER. (1923, December 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 21. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1994780

OUR CHRISTMAS DINNER. (1923, December 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 21. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1994780

The Argus of December 18, 1923 offered Christmas gift suggestions in the “Woman’s Realm” column.  French embroidery dressing table mats looked “charming” on a glass-topped table.  The Christmas handkerchief was always welcome with some relying on a handkerchief gift to replenish their supply. Telephone book covers and patience card sets were also suggested.

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    WOMAN'S REALM. (1923, December 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 14. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2000447MLA citation

WOMAN’S REALM. (1923, December 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 14. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2000447
MLA citation

Christmas 1923 in Horsham sounded a little brighter than 1922.  The greenery on shops and the ladies’ summer dresses added to the splendour of the fine weather.

CHRISTMAS EVE IN HORSHAM. (1923, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72737815

CHRISTMAS EVE IN HORSHAM. (1923, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72737815

The annual Christmas treat at May Park had grown into a popular Christmas Eve fixture in Horsham by Christmas 1924.

CHILDREN'S CHRISTMAS TREAT. (1924, November 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72752604

CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS TREAT. (1924, November 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72752604

The shopkeepers of Portland were competing for a prize of one guinea from the Mayor for their Christmas 1924 window displays.

CHRISTMAS EVE WINDOW DISPLAY. (1924, December 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64106332

CHRISTMAS EVE WINDOW DISPLAY. (1924, December 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64106332

If you were wanting a step by step guide to preparing a 1924 style Christmas dinner, this is it.  Worth reading if you have a mother in law or sisters visiting.  Failure to take heed could see your reputation as “a good housekeeper…hang on a thread”.  This really is priceless and is a wonderful insight into domestic tasks of the 1920s.

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WOMEN to WOMEN. (1924, December 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2090278

WOMEN to WOMEN. (1924, December 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2090278

Christmas 1925 was looking disastrous for the parishioners of the Horsham Church of Christ when they heard the news that Father Christmas was stranded at Dooen Hill after his plane had broken down.  A rescue party was sent  and he eventually arrived with presents for all.

CHRISTMAS TREE. (1925, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73011596

CHRISTMAS TREE. (1925, December 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73011596

Goodwill and good business marked Christmas 1925 in Horsham.   The reporter also noted that the pine boughs on the shop verandah posts served the purpose of stopping people propping up the posts, “Australia’s favourite duty”.

THAT CHRISTMAS FEELING. (1925, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73011820

THAT CHRISTMAS FEELING. (1925, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73011820

While the night soil man and his family innocently enjoyed a hearty Christmas dinner of two geese thanks to what he thought was a generous Christmas box, the true owners lamented that things don’t always turn out the way one expects them to.

NICE CHRISTMAS PRESENT. (1926, January 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73000513

NICE CHRISTMAS PRESENT. (1926, January 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73000513

A. and P. Glover of Horsham opened an extra shop during Christmas 1926 to cater for the increase in trade.

CHRISTMAS TOY CARNIVAL. (1926, November 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73017110

CHRISTMAS TOY CARNIVAL. (1926, November 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73017110

A Christmas story from Horsham, 1926.

HER CHRISTMAS LETTER. (1926, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73017834

HER CHRISTMAS LETTER. (1926, December 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73017834

The Border Watch. (1926, December 23). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77688066

The Border Watch. (1926, December 23). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77688066

Father Christmas of Balloon Land?? wrote a letter to the Editor of the Portland Guardian to announce his visit to the Portland Free Library.

OUR LETTER BOX. (1927, November 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64259155

OUR LETTER BOX. (1927, November 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64259155

Mr. G.C Perring  advised Horsham residents that he was taking orders for Christmas Cakes for the 1927 celebration.

CHRISTMAS CAKES. (1927, December 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72999479

CHRISTMAS CAKES. (1927, December 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72999479

The Post Master General’s department distributed three million of the following posters in 1927.

CHRISTMAS POSTER. (1927, December 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 33. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3897110

CHRISTMAS POSTER. (1927, December 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 33. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3897110

The Christmas Box Art Union were selling Australian made Christmas cards.

Christmas Cards. (1928, October 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64267379

Christmas Cards. (1928, October 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64267379

The Argus Shopping Page offered a range of last minute gift ideas.  Interesting items listed under the heading “Sweets for Children” were bunches of grapes and pink radishes along with tool sets and chocolate telephones.

"THE ARGUS" SHOPPING PAGE. (1928, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3976851

“THE ARGUS” SHOPPING PAGE. (1928, December 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 13, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3976851

Every shop in Horsham had taken the trouble to decorate for Christmas 1928.  People were beginning to feel the pinch as the decade drew to a close.

THAT CHRISTMAS FEELING. (1928, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72681761

THAT CHRISTMAS FEELING. (1928, December 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 12, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72681761

Only weeks on from the Wall Street Crash of 1929, Jim Scullin was insisting that Australians buy Australian.  With high unemployment, the crash and a trade deficit of 10 million pounds there was a sense of urgency to stimulate the local economy and create jobs.  Examples of the products imported were £400,000 of serviettes and linen and £46,000 of playing cards.

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. (1929, December 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 14. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4054513

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. (1929, December 5). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 14. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4054513

Santa dropped in at the Laverton Air school in December 1929.

MODERN FATHER CHRISTMAS. (1929, December 7). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 17. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4055264

The Argus of December 13, 1929 offered tips on getting through Christmas during a time of “financial stringency”.  Christmas trees ranged in price from 5/6 to 7/6 but a cheaper option was pieces of bamboo or hardwood placed in a pot and adorned with pine needles or asparagus fern.

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"THE ARGUS" SHOPPING PAGE. (1929, December 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4056538

“THE ARGUS” SHOPPING PAGE. (1929, December 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 13. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4056538


Spring Fashion

Spring has arrived and a girl’s thoughts turn to a new season’s wardrobe.   This was no different in 1940, 1900 and even 1860 with retailers promoting new season’s trends from as early as July.  Ladies in Western Victoria would have required their woollens for a few more months , but a new Spring outfit was necessary for the milder days and social outings.

Mr David Jones was offering a “Grand Show” of spring wear at his shop on Main Road, Ballarat in 1858.

Advertising. (1858, September 15). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 – 1864), p. 1. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66050200

In 1862, the Old Criterion Store on Main Road Ballarat offered 1000 parasols for sale, perfect  to keep the Australian sun’s harsh rays at bay.

Advertising. (1862, October 13). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 – 1864), p. 1. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66327869

A sample of spring fashions from 1878.

Spring Fashions. (1878, September 7). Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 – 1872), p. 7. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63335118

Spring fashions for the elegant lady of 1885.

[No heading]. (1885, August 24). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 – 1889), p. 133. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5739497

The following article appeared in the Portland Guardian on August 1881and offered spring fashion tips for the ladies of the Western District.  White, all shades of red and heliotrope were the colours of the season.  Grey was the new black and black was back.  Cashmere and plaid wool fabrics were popular as were ribbons and beading for embellishment.

THE LADIES’ COLUMN. (1888, August 31). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63589936

The 20th century arrived but fashion was so last century.

THE LADIES’ COLUMN. (1905, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30351894

Fashion began to evolve during World War 1.  One change was dress length, with hems going up to save material.  An interesting website Fashion Era offers further examples of fashion during this period.

SPRING FASHIONS. (1915, August 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1544786

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These dresses from 1918 show traditional styles were still popular.

Spring Fashions. (1916, September 2). The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889, 1914 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved August 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74835347

But things were changing and this dress, also from 1918, is an example of that.

COMING FASHIONS. (1918, July 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1404142

I love this stylish advertisement for Allans The Drapers of Fibrace street Horsham from 1927.

Advertising. (1927, September 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72996175

Fancy the Phryne Fisher look?

FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, August 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72676520

I can’t resist sharing more of the wonderful 1920s fashions, again from the “Horsham Times”.

Advertising. (1929, October 4). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 9. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72672337

Another stylish look,  this time from 1930.

Woman’s Interests. (1930, July 3). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78010734

The Great Depression saw a rise in the number of sewing columns in the newspapers.  This article gave advice on how to recycle a frock.  The full article is here

“THE ARGUS” SHOOPING PAGE. (1930, August 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4104490

Patterns were back for Spring 1935.

Gay Patterns for Spring Frocks. (1935, August 14). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 15. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11757450

World War 2 saw a dramatic drop in the number of “spring fashion” articles in the papers, more so than the Great War.  The years 1942, 1943 and 1944 had very few and those I found were mostly for sewing patterns.   Families relied on coupons to buy goods, there was rationing of goods including fabrics and the fashion houses of Paris closed.  If a woman wanted to keep up appearances, there was little alternative but to make a frock or remodel one from last season.  The latter half of the 1940s saw a rapid increase in fashion articles as women turned again to the fashion stages of Europe for inspiration and cast aside their drab wartime clothing.

BE CHIC… but coupon canny. (1942, October 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 7. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46446873

A few bright notions to cope with a war budget. (1942, January 10). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 24 Section: Fashion Portfolio. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article54876753

Shock, horror “Hems to go higher” in 1952.  Just wait until the 60s!

Hems to go higher. (1952, May 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 5. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23197518

I could have continued to the 1960s but that would have gone on for some time as I do like the fashion particularly from the latter half of the decade. I could have gone on to the 70s too.  While fashion from that decade was much maligned during the 1980s, anyone who saw Paper Giants: The Birth of Cleo was reminded of the great fashions of the 1970s.  I think the 1980s would have pulled it up though. Agreed?

Looking at  fashions of  different eras is beneficial to the family historian especially if you are trying to date photos.  It also gives us some idea of what our female ancestors might have endured for either the sake of fashion or managing with what was available.  The long, impractical dresses of the 19th and early 20th century make me think of my ggg grandmothers on farms, getting in and out of buggies and tending fires for washing and cooking.  Consider how your grandmothers or great grandmothers managed during the Depression when money was tight or  World War 2 with coupons and rationing.  No wonder my Nana was good at sewing, darning and knitting. It was a necessity.

***If you are interested in learning how your female ancestors washed their big dresses during the 1850s, the Sovereign Hill Education blog has great posts on washing, drying and ironing.


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