Tag Archives: Portland

The Vagabond Tours the Portland District

It’s time to re-join The Vagabond on his tour of Picturesque Victoria.  Last time we caught up with him, he was touring the town of Portland.   In this installment, he ventures out to the countryside surrounding the town and he was not disappointed.  I would have to agree with him that the landscape around the town “is the most picturesque and varied scenery”  seen along the Victorian coastline.

With an old Portland citizen, the Vagabond headed toward Narrawong and Heywood.  Looking out to sea he caught a view of Julia Percy Island and Lawrence Rocks.

vag

LAWRENCE ROCKS & JULIA PERCY ISLAND (background). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. IMP25/12/65/193 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95486

LAWRENCE ROCKS & JULIA PERCY ISLAND (background). Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. IMP25/12/65/193 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95486

The Vagabond reflected on the early settlement of the district and likened the countryside around him to an English country lane.

vag1Out of Portland , the Vagabond and the “Ancient Citizen” met the colony’s first road, built by the Hentys.  Although the colony was only within the first 50 years of settlement, change was upon it.  The railways had been costly to the hotels along the roadways as noted by The Vagabond as he passed two empty hotels.

vag5

After a stop in Portland, The Vagabond set off again for the rugged coastline of Nelson Bay.  The secretary of the Portland Jubilee committee accompanied him, one of many gentleman offering endless hospitality to the acclaimed writer, hopeful for a good word about their town.

vagAs they left Portland, heading West, the travelling party passed “Burswood” the former home of Edward Henty and they admired the unique flora along the roadside.

BURSWOOD.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Colin Caldwell Trust collection, Image no. H84.276/6/44A  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72455

BURSWOOD. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Colin Caldwell Trust collection, Image no. H84.276/6/44A http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72455

Before long they had reached Nelson Bay and the wrath of the seas below came a little closer than was comfortable. “Below the waves circle one after another – placid and quiet in the outer rings, increasing in speed and fury until they dash in a foaming surf on the rocks and sands at the base of the cliff”

vag2

098 (800x600)

 

090

Ahead The Vagabond could see his destination, the Cape Nelson lighthouse.

073

CAPE NELSON LIGHTHOUSE

vag3

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved November 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061787

 

101 (800x600)

 

109

LIGHTHOUSE KEEPER’S RESIDENCE

After climbing the 115 steps to the balcony near the top of the lighthouse, The Vagabond looked out to sea at the passing vessels, while the lighthouse keeper, Mr Fisher,told him lighthouse tales.

vag1

084

From the lighthouse, the horse’s heads turned toward Cape Bridgewater.  The Vagabond quipped that the Banks of Portland would not be offering customers overdrafts on that day because all the managers were travelling with him.

vag6

The Vagabond stopped to marvel at the Bat’s Ridge cave.  He advised visitors to the caves to take their own candles,  magnesium wire and string.

349

BATS’ RIDGE CAVE

vag8

A little further on and the group arrived at serene Bridgewater Bay and its small settlement.

122 (800x600)

vag2

BRIDGEWATER BAY

BRIDGEWATER BAY

Continuing westward they came to Cape Bridgewater and the Blowholes.

CAPE BRIDGEWATER.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no. H32492/1662 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64872

CAPE BRIDGEWATER. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H32492/1662
http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64872

 

139 (800x600)

 

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061787

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved December 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061787

BLOWHOLE, CAPE BRIDGEWATER.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no, H32492/1661 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/65004

BLOWHOLE, CAPE BRIDGEWATER. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no, H32492/1661 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/65004

Join The Vagabond on his next installment of Picturesque Victoria, continuing along the south-west coastline.  What did he see that he described as “fearfully sublime” and “grandly weird”?  Find out next time.

Full Article “Picturesque Victoria, Excursions from Portland, No 1″


Trove Tuesday – High Fire Danger

This week’s Trove Tuesday post began as a story about Magic Lanterns, the early version of the film projector, and the problems they were causing in Portland in 1914.  But a reference in the article to “celluloid collars” changed the post slightly to include another unexpected fire risk to mostly men and boys of the early 20th century.

The first article comes from the Portland Guardian of October 14, 1914.  A cheap toy Magic Lantern, or more precisely the lens of the lantern, was the curse of the mother’s of Portland boys.  The lenses, probably removed for the purpose of mischief by the boys, were burning holes in their pockets.  The whistle-blower on the events, warned that if one were placed in a celluloid collar, disaster would prevail.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1914, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63970668

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1914, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63970668

That got me thinking, why were celluloid collars such a risk.  While I assumed that being made from the same material as film, they would be flammable (thanks to a recent episode of Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries for that realisation), but was the danger really that great?  A Trove search found that yes they were a danger, and sometimes in the most innocent ways.  One  headline I found was “Killed by Collar of Fire” , another “Dangers of Celluloid”.  I’ve read many accounts of the risks to ladies wearing full skirts around open fires and even sparks from buggy wheels catching an overhanging skirt, but celluloid collars, it seems, were the male equivalent.

Some Horsham children were lucky that the celluloid collar they were playing with didn’t cause more damage.

A FIRE AVERTED. (1915, June 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72974894

A FIRE AVERTED. (1915, June 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72974894

The photo below is of a Magic Lantern, but not a toy that the Portland boys had.  For the purpose of the demonstration, the photo of the Magic Lantern was taken in daylight, but darkness was necessary to view the projected images.

A Magic Lantern (1909).  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H2009.29/120 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/159294

A Magic Lantern (1909). Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H2009.29/120 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/159294


The Vagabond…Out and About in Portland

The first installment of The Vagabond’s Picturesque Victoria in Western Victoria, introduced Portland of 1884 and reflected on the history of the area.   The second installment sees the Vagabond, still in Portland and, on a tour of the town.   He admires the Portland Botanic Gardens, soaks up the atmosphere of the Portland North cemetery and visits the inmates of the Portland Benevolent Asylum.

The first stop was St. Stephens Church, undergoing an extension at the time.  The Vagabond noted the church’s opulence, much of it built from Henty money and a memorial stained glass window giving thanks for their generosity had been installed.

vaga1

St Stephens Church, Portland

ST STEPHENS CHURCH

The Vagabond mentioned the left hand end of the church was boarded up for extensions and the ivy that gave the church an aged  appearance.  The image below would have been how the church looked in 1884, before the extension began and the church today (above)

ST STEPHENS CHURCH, PORTLAND (c1880).  Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.  Image No.  B 21766/101 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/22000/B21766_101.htm

ST STEPHENS CHURCH, PORTLAND (c1880). Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. Image No. B 21766/101 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/22000/B21766_101.htm

193

INTERIOR, ST. STEPHENS CHURCH,

Next, the Botanic gardens, the “pride of Portland”.

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS

Local residents enjoyed strawberries growing at the back of the gardens but anyone trying to scale the garden’s fence faced ferocious dogs chained at intervals around the perimeter.

vaga4vaga5vaga6

PORTLAND BOTANIC GARDENS

PORTLAND BOTANIC GARDENS

The time he spent  imbedded at the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, must have  deepened The Vagabonds’ compassion for the unfortunates residing in such institutions.  His visit to the Portland Benevolent society gives a most interesting insight into the  life of the residents.

Nineteen men and one woman, residents at the time of the Vagabond’s visit, were eating supper of bread and butter and tea.  Many were early arrivals to the colony and most had worked for the Henty family …”poor old fellows, they are remnants of a much despised class, not by any means all bad, good mates to each other, who bore the heat and burden of the early days of colonial life”

vaga7vaga8vaga9

The Old Portland Cemetery had the same effect on the Vagabond as it did on me, even though we visited almost 130 years apart…”I love the place” he declared.

053

vaga10vaga11

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY

In 1884, if one was to remove the churches and public buildings from Portland, there would be little left, according to the Vagabond.  There were ploughed paddocks in the city centre and cows grazing in the streets.

vaga12The Vagabond considered Mac’s Hotel (below) one of the finest bluestone buildings outside of Melbourne.

MAC'S HOTEL, PORTLAND

MAC’S HOTEL, PORTLAND

Fishing was the main trade in Portland when he visited, but The Vagabond could foresee a day when Portland would resemble Scarborough, England.  He noted the relaxed feel of the town where ladies could visit and not feel they had to change up to four times a day, they even could wear their “oldest gowns”.

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061545

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 6. Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061545

The photo below is of Portland’s beach around the 1940s.  While villas weren’t lining the cliff tops as the Vagabond predicted, I think he would have been happy that his prophecy had eventuated in part.

THE BEACH, PORTLAND (ca1940-ca1950) Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image No. H86.98/429 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/84638

THE BEACH, PORTLAND (ca1940-ca1950) Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image No. H86.98/429 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/84638


The Vagabond Rocks the Cradle

With introductions out of the way in an earlier post, let’s join The Vagabond’s tour through the Western District for his  Picturesque Victoria series.  “The Cradle of Victoria No. 1″  was the first of two articles about his first port of call,  Portland.

Prior to reaching Portland, The Vagabond had travelled through parts of eastern Victoria and along the Murray River to Mildura.  He then headed south, arriving in Portland in November 1884, just in time for the Henty Jubilee on November 19, celebrating 50 years since Edward Henty settled at Portland, then widely considered as the first permanent European settler at Portland.   Overlooked was that whaler and sealer William Dutton who was feeling pretty settled in his hut in the years before 1834, growing potatoes between whaling trips…but that’s another story.

The article begins with an extensive history of Portland, from the first Europeans to sight land, up until the 1830s.  He discusses the Portuguese, with a reference to the Mahogany ship, thought buried under the sands of a beach between Port Fairy and Warrnambool.

portport1

The Vagabond then turned his attention to the early 1830s and the arrival of the Hentys. He tells a story that I never tire of, that of the meeting between Edward Henty and Major Thomas Mitchell.   The Vagabonds descriptive style makes his account my favourite to date.

 

port2port3

Please excuse my photo of a sketch hanging at Portland’s History House depicting the meeting.

172

The last section of The Vagabond’s article describes Portland in 1884, starting with the transport available from Melbourne to Portland.  We can take something from this for our family history research.  We record our ancestors movements  between towns or states, but it is easy to overlook how they may have made the trip or the time it took.   While they seem to teleport on paper, there were more practical methods available.

Aside from bullock wagon, dray or foot, one could travel overland from Melbourne on the train, or take the coastal route on a steamer.  The train trip from Melbourne, with stops at  Geelong, Ballarat, Ararat and Hamilton, cost 45s.  The trip was 13 hours.  The ticket price of the steamer was “ridiculously low” according to The Vagabond, with a cabin priced at 12s 6d for passage only.  Food was extra.  The trip was 24 hours with stops at Warrnambool and Port Fairy.  This was his transport of choice but he does suggest that those with a weaker stomach than his own may suffer “mal de mer”

While in Portland, The Vagabond, stayed at Richmond House, the Henty’s first home turned guest house.  The following sketch, from 1884, the same year The Vagabond visited Portland, shows Richmond House at the top centre.

PORTLAND, PAST AND PRESENT Alfred Martin Ebsworth,c. December 17, 1884.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. A/S17/12/84/197 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/91532

PORTLAND, PAST AND PRESENT Alfred Martin Ebsworth,c. December 17, 1884. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. A/S17/12/84/197 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/91532

The Vagabond concludes:

port6

This is another beautifully written article by The Vagabond and if you follow the link, you can read the article in full – “Picturesque Victoria – The Cradle of Victoria No. 1

The Vagabond was good enough to include his sources:

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 4. Retrieved August 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061393

PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. (1884, November 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved August 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6061393

In my next Vagabond post, he will still be rocking around Portland, with a tour of the town he thought had an “atmosphere of bygone days”.


“Claremont” Portland

It’s been 18 months since our Portland visit and I’m still trying to find a moment to share some photos.  Recently I got around to writing the Portland Botanical Gardens post that had sat in my drafts for months with just photos waiting to be fleshed out.  It’s the fleshing out that is my downfall as you will see soon see.

While in Portland, I stole myself away and took the Portland Historic Buildings walking tour.   Incredibly for a town of its size, there are more than 200 buildings in the Portland CBD that date back to the 1800s.  It was on that self-guided tour that I found “Claremont” at 65 Julia Street, just along from the St Stephen’s Church.

195

I had only intended to share the photos of “Claremont” and give a small amount of information about the former residents, but as usual, once I got searching at Trove I couldn’t leave it at that.  There was very little information about “Claremont” elsewhere online, save for an entry on the Victorian Heritage Database that only gave the person who had the house built and an early resident, information I had from the walking tour guide.  But it was Trove that took the story of “Claremont” an extra step.  Or two.

Stephen George Henty  had “Claremont”  built in 1852.  He rented the property to his brother Francis, but Francis only used “Claremont” as his seaside residence while his country residence was Merino Downs Station” and his city residence was “Field Place”  at Kew in Melbourne.

BUILDING an Aristocracy for AUSTRALIA. (1934, December 15). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 19. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58435596

FRANCIS AND MARY-ANN HENTY – BUILDING an Aristocracy for AUSTRALIA. (1934, December 15). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 19. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58435596

As “Claremont” was not a permanent home there was not much to be found about it in the papers until 1889 when Francis Henty passed away at “Field Place“.  He left “Claremont” and the furniture to his daughter Caroline Henty (1849-1914).  As he was able to bequeath “Claremont“, formally owned by his brother , it is likely that Stephen Henty left the house to Francis at the time of his own death in 1872.  I have not been able to find information about Stephen Henty’s estate at either PROV or Trove.

The Will of the late Mr. Franis Henty. (1889, March 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592299

The Will of the late Mr. Franis Henty. (1889, March 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592299

The three daughters of Francis Henty also inherited “Merino Downs”.

The Late Mr. Francis Henty. (1889, March 16). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), p. 513. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19812393

The Late Mr. Francis Henty. (1889, March 16). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 – 1939), p. 513. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19812393

In 1900, the sisters registered a Deed of Partition and “Merino Downs” was split into three separate properties, “Merino Downs”, “Talisker” and “Wurt Wurt Koort”  with each sisters retaining a property each.  Caroline took charge of “Talisker Estate .

Caroline was quite a catch and a year after her father’s passing she married  Alexander Magnus McLeod (1846-1910), not a bad catch himself.  With Caroline and Alexander living at the “Talisker Estate”, Alexander’s spinster sisters Catherine (1845-1919) and Constance (1859-1934) and, at times, his bachelor brother Wallace (1855-1919) took up residence at “Claremont“.

The McLeods were the children of John Norman Mcleod and Agnes Patterson.  John owned “Castlemaddie” at Tyrendarra and “Maretimo” at Portland.  Incidentally, John purchased “Castlemaddie” and while he was waiting for the sale to go through, he had “Maretimo” built.  Constance was born at “Maretimo” in 1859.

"MARETIMO", PORTLAND, VICTORIA. ca.1874-ca.1895.  Photographer: O.Dolphin.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no.  H31761 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/172772

“MARETIMO”, PORTLAND, VICTORIA. ca.1874-ca.1895. Photographer: O.Dolphin. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H31761 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/172772

While I can’t find when Alexander McLeod’s siblings went to live at “Claremont“, at least one Miss McLeod was in residence  in 1902, although she was heading off for a summer holiday.

[No heading]. (1902, December 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 10. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page332030

[No heading]. (1902, December 18). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 10. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page332030

Another possible guide was the death of the McLeod sister’s mother Agnes Patterson in 1901.  Her obituary stated  she had moved into town from “Castlemaddie” and passed away in Julia Street.

There was also a death of a baby at “Claremont” in 1904.  I did try to find a link between Phyllis Mary Crawford and the McLeods or the Hentys, but after a quick look without success, I gave up.  The story was getting deep enough.

Family Notices. (1904, April 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 1. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10315347

Family Notices. (1904, April 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 1. Retrieved August 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10315347

Claremont” hosted the St. Stephen’s girls confirmation class in April 1909 as they gave thanks to Catherine and Constance for making their confirmation veils.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1909, April 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63987683

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1909, April 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63987683

The Portland branch of the Australian Women’s National League was established during a meeting at “”Claremont” in January 1911.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1911, January 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63979327

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1911, January 11). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63979327

Through the years, the  McLeod sisters occasionally ran advertisements looking for staff.  In 1912, a general servant was required.

Advertising. (1912, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003591

Advertising. (1912, December 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003591

In 1914, Caroline McLeod (Henty) passed away.  Her probate documents listed “Claremont” and the two acres of land it stood on to the value of £160,000.  Her estate was placed in trust for her two daughters Caroline Agnes Henty McLeod ( 1892-1943) and Alexandra Frances Henty McLeod (1894-1943) aged 22 and 20 respectively at the time of their mother’s death.  In the meantime the girls’ aunts and uncle continued to live at “Claremont“.

In July 1919, Wallace McLeod passed away aged 64 at “Claremont“.

Portland Guardian. (1919, July 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63959256

Portland Guardian. (1919, July 28). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63959256

Two months later his older sister, Catherine was dead.

Portland Guardian First Issue August 20, 1842. (1919, September 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63959741

Portland Guardian First Issue August 20, 1842. (1919, September 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63959741

The death of her brother and sister in such close succession, led Constance to reconsider her future at “Claremont“.  On June 9, 1920 she held a auction of furniture.

Advertising. (1920, June 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021540

Advertising. (1920, June 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021540

A week later, her friends gave her a send off in the St Stephen’s Parish Hall.

ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH HALL, PORTLAND

ST STEPHEN’S CHURCH HALL, PORTLAND

Constance was going on an extended holiday.  She was most likely heading to New Zealand to stay with her sister Jessie, married to Frederick Loisel.  Jessie  was present at the send off and lived in New Zealand by that time.

cl3

Presentation to Miss McLeod. (1920, June 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021677

Presentation to Miss McLeod. (1920, June 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021677

In 1934,  Constance passed away in New Zealand.  She and her sister Jessie had just departed Hamilton, New Zealand bound for Portland for the Portland Century Celebrations, when Constance fell ill and died.

Obituary. (1934, October 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64286992

Obituary. (1934, October 8). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64286992

After the deaths of Wallace and Catherine and the departure of Constance, “Claremont” was vacant.  In June 1920, the Estate of Caroline Henty, advertised “Claremont” for lease by tender with a term of three years.

Advertising. (1920, June 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021641

Advertising. (1920, June 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64021641

There is something about the  staircase in the foyer of “Claremont”.  I think it is because I can imagine the likes of Mrs Mary-Ann Henty, wife of Francis, or her daughter Caroline, sweeping done the stairs in their crinolines while in summer residence.  The State Library of Victoria holds a photograph of Caroline Henty in her crinoline, if you care to imagine further.

197

Taking up the lease of “Claremont” in 1920 was Caroline Florence McLean , daughter of Hector McLean and Mary Ann Humphries of Casterton.  Only a year after her arrival another death occurred at “Claremont“, that of returned WW1 soldier Benjamin Byard.   Reading Benjamin’s War  Service Record I found that he only made it as far as England when he fell ill with tuberculous.  He spent time in hospital in England before returning to Melbourne and was again confined.  Once released he travelled to his hometown of Casterton to meet up with friends.  It was suggested to him that he visit Portland and he ended  up at the home of Caroline McLean.

When I initially found this story, I couldn’t understand how Ben just seem to pitch his tent in “Claremont’s” front yard. It was after finding out more about Caroline that I found her Casterton link and that went a long way to explaining how Ben chose her front yard to pitch his tent.

A Pathetic Ending. (1921, August 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64024369

A Pathetic Ending. (1921, August 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64024369

It was a happier time at “Claremont” in June 1922, when Maud McLean of Casterton, Caroline’s sister, married James Anderson of East Malvern, at St Stephens Church.  The wedding breakfast was held at “Claremont

Family Notices. (1922, June 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64026127

Family Notices. (1922, June 22). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64026127

After seven years at “Claremont” it was time for Caroline to move on.  An afternoon tea was held as a send off.  One of the attendees was Sarah Wadmore, author of Portland’s Pioneer Women’s Book of Remembrance.

Valedictory Tea. (1927, May 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64256993

Valedictory Tea. (1927, May 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64256993

After the departure of Caroline McLean, “Claremont” was put up for sale as a guest house.

Advertising. (1927, May 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64257015

Advertising. (1927, May 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64257015

By November 1927, “Claremont‘ was a guest house accommodating professionals such as Nurse Frances the Chiropodist.

The Portland Guardian. (1927, November 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64259180

The Portland Guardian. (1927, November 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64259180

There were vacancies at “Claremont in June 1929.

Advertising. (1929, June 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269647

Advertising. (1929, June 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269647

While I can’t find who owned “Claremont” at this point, I do know that Janet Kosch took over the registration of the boarding house in 1930.  Prior to that there was a Mrs McIntosh and then Norman McIntyre holding the registration.

Borough Council. (1930, November 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64293741

Borough Council. (1930, November 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64293741

In 1934, the two acres of land that made up the “Claremont” property were subdivided.  Again it is not clear who the vendor was, the Henty estate or a new owner from a possible sale back in 1927.

"Claremont" Sud-division. (1934, October 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287062

“Claremont” Sud-division. (1934, October 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64287062

Mrs Kosch was still running the “Claremont” guest house in 1943 when her son visited her and her husband while on leave from service.

NEWS OF THE FORCES. (1943, October 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64387036

NEWS OF THE FORCES. (1943, October 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64387036

In 1948, after 18 years running the “Claremont” guest house, Mrs Kosch retired.  She held a furniture sale on April 22, 1948.  In 1952 she passed away at Heywood.

    Advertising. (1948, April 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64414613

Advertising. (1948, April 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 18, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64414613

“Claremont” continued on as a guest house to at least 1954.   In recent years it has been a bed and breakfast and an art gallery, as it was when I visited.  It has also been for sale.  The listing is seen on this link:  http://www.homehound.com.au/65+julia+street+portland+vic+3305/       The verandah has changed and a photo of the original verandah can be seen on this link http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72863

In at least the first 100 years of existence “Claremont” was many things but never a family home.  There were  never children raised under its roof or playing in the yard, memories were never kept of a treasured family home.  It was always a temporary house, even when the Misses McLeods and Miss McLean where in residence, they were more out than in.  Now. at the end of my search, I think the reason I kept digging for information is that I wanted to find “Claremont’ as a home, not a just summer residence or a guest house, but I never did.

196


Portland Botanical Gardens

The Western District has many historic botanic gardens, most established from the 1850s to the 1870s when it was the thing for a town to do, if nothing else, to keep up with the neighbouring town.  For some it was scientific purposes, to acclimatise plants and sometimes animals, as with the Hamilton Botanic Gardens.  There is a sense of history walking through each garden and the tall specimen trees such as oaks, redwoods and pines whisper the tales of times past.

The Portland Botanical Gardens, like the rest of the town, ooze history.  Each botanic garden is unique in some way and Portland is no different and is unlike other gardens I have visited including  Hamilton and Geelong.

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS

Land for the gardens was first marked out in 1851, but it took a few years of public meetings for the gardens to be established.  In 1853, the Honourary Secretary  remarked on the “advantages of  a botanical garden, and the study of botanical science”.

PORTLAND. (1853, August 5). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 1 Edition: DAILY., Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE GEELONG ADVERTISER AND INTELLIGENCER. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86412916

PORTLAND. (1853, August 5). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), p. 1 Edition: DAILY., Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE GEELONG ADVERTISER AND INTELLIGENCER. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86412916

At a public meeting six months later, on February 4, 1854 chaired by James Blair, Stephen Henty proposed that a committee be formed to get the gardens up and running.

    BOTANICAL GARDEN. (1854, February 9). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved June 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71569639

BOTANICAL GARDEN. (1854, February 9). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved June 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71569639

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS c1891.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image No.  H42199/21 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/183906

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS c1891. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image No. H42199/21 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/183906

Works began in 1858, assisted by Alexander Elliot from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne, however a lack of funds was slowing progress.

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF PORTLAND. (1858, March 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64570632

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF PORTLAND. (1858, March 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64570632

By November however, the gardens were beginning to take shape and the curator’s cottage was under construction.

CURATOR'S COTTAGE

CURATOR’S COTTAGE

DOMESTIC INTELIGENCE. (1858, November 3). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64509473

DOMESTIC INTELIGENCE. (1858, November 3). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64509473

In 1859, a letter to the Portland Guardian questioned the practice of allowing horses to graze in the gardens overnight.  “Delta” wondered why the committee could keep their horses at the gardens while “the great unwashed are warned at the gate, Dogs not Admitted”

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. (1859, May 2). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64510907

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. (1859, May 2). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64510907

BOTANICAL GARDENS. (1859, May 2). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64510906

BOTANICAL GARDENS. (1859, May 2). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64510906

If you visit the Portland Botanical Gardens, look up at the tall trees and think of those that planted them or as you walk the paths consider the hands that carved them.  The story behind these features is my favourite story about the gardens.

Table Talk. (1863, April 23). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64628622

Table Talk. (1863, April 23). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64628622

At a meeting of the Portland Historical Committee in 1932, the secretary told the story of the Chinese prisoners and their work at the Portland Botanical Gardens.

Historical Committee. (1932, March 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64297702

Historical Committee. (1932, March 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64297702

On the wall of the curator’s cottage is a plaque recognising previous curators of the gardens from the kindly William Allitt in 1861 through to Colin Ellingworth, curator from 1982-1987.

373Andrew Callander was curator from 1922-1949.  Upon his appointment, Mr Callander set about tidying up the gardens and building a ti-tree green house for seedling propagation.

    THE PORTLAND LIFEBOAT. (1926, January 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64252901

THE PORTLAND LIFEBOAT. (1926, January 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64252901

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.  Image no.  H32492/1655 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64772

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria. Image no. H32492/1655 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/64772

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/66929

PORTLAND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/66929

At one time both croquet and tennis were played at the gardens and there were often tensions between the two groups and any other group that hoped to share the space.

TABLE TALK. (1876, November 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63336790

TABLE TALK. (1876, November 3). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63336790

THE LAWN TENNIS GROUND AGAIN. (1887, September 2). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65410048

THE LAWN TENNIS GROUND AGAIN. (1887, September 2). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65410048

375

CROQUET LAWN

Croquet won out and is still played today.  The tennis courts were converted to rose gardens.  The rosary was first proposed in 1930 but it was 1931 before there was further action.

pbg10

Borough Council. (1931, April 13). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 5, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64294863

Borough Council. (1931, April 13). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 5, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64294863

378

376

“Wandering Willie’s Wife” visited the Portland Botanical Gardens in 1926 and felt compelled to write a letter to the editor of the Portland Guardian on the subject of a nameless lifeboat on display in the gardens.  Could it have been the lifeboat, captained by James Fawthrop, used to rescue  survivors from the wreck of the  S.S. Admella ?  Why wasn’t there a name plaque?

pbg8

THE PORTLAND LIFEBOAT. (1926, January 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved July 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64252901

Three years later, “Wandering Willie’s Wife” wrote to the editor again, prompted by the announcement that a “tablet” with the story of the  lifeboat Portland would be placed beside the boat.

OUR LETTER BOX. (1929, May 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269425

OUR LETTER BOX. (1929, May 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269425

The lifeboat is now removed from the elements and is housed in the Portland Maritime Discovery Centre.

030

LIFEBOAT PORTLAND

ABC Southwest broadcast a story about the Portland Botanic Gardens in March 2009.  The story, including audio and better photos than my own (excluding the wonderful historic photos I found at Trove) can be found by following the link http://www.abc.net.au/local/photos/2009/03/26/2525642.htm

A BILLS HORSE TROUGH (Portland Gardens)

A BILLS HORSE TROUGH (Portland Gardens)


Passing of the Pioneers

Welcome to a bumper May Passing of the Pioneers.  So many interesting pioneers passed in  the month of May,  I had to leave some for next year.  Those that remain had such great stories that it was necessary to share some extra bits and pieces found about them.  Some just passed through the Western District from time to time, others lived there only for a short period while others were residents for over 50 years, but they all left their mark in some way.    They include army captains, ship captains, a dentist and a naturalist.

Captain Foster FYANS:  Died May 23, 1870 at Newtown.  Western Victorian historian, Margaret Kiddle, wrote in her book Men of Yesterday: a social history of the Western District of Victoria (1834-1890) “the story of  Foster Fyans’ commissionership is a joy to historians” (p.50) . Born in Dublin, Ireland, Foster Fyans was an army captain.  He enlisted in 1816 and served with different regiments of the British army including a stint in India.  On arrival in Australia in 1833, he became the captain of the guard on Norfolk Island and remained there for two years.  In 1837, he left the army and headed to Port Phillip to become the first police magistrate at Geelong.

From 1840, Foster Fyans held the important position of  Crown Lands Commissioner for the Portland Bay area.   A squatter taking up land had to seek permission from the Commissioner and pay an annual fee.  The Commissioner’s word was law and there was no arguing with Foster Fyans, a man with a temper.  He tangled with many squatters including the Hentys.  Governor  La Trobe had his moments with Fyans and Kiddle cites La Trobe declaring Fyans “secured to him the chance of a duel once at least in the week as long as he may live” (p.50).

As commissioner, Fyans would ride great distances from Geelong through to Portland and into the Wimmera, a formidable task but his skills marking out selections  may not have been as great  according to Richard Bennett’s Early Days in Port Fairy (edited by Jan Critchett).  Fyans’ marking of runs “amounted to almost a farce” as Bennett  described the technique used by Fyans:

They were usually laid off in ten mile blocks, measured with a compass in his hand, and timing his horse.  A blackfellow followed, and notched a tree line.  When the Commissioner had travelled what he considered the distance, he notched a corner tree with a broad arrow, and then rode off again at right angles to the next corner, and so on round the block.  Captain Fyans was a bluff old gentleman…” (p.26).

Despite his ways, Fyans was kept on as Commissioner because their was no one else qualified to do the job.

THE LATE CAPTAIN FYANS. (1870, June 18). Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875), p. 114. Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60449034

THE LATE CAPTAIN FYANS. (1870, June 18). Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 – 1875), p. 114. Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60449034

Foster Fyans died at Balyang (below) in the Geelong suburb of Newtown and while the house was demolished in 1896, the site is now a part of the Balyang sanctuary. Around the Geelong area the Fyans name is still present with Fyans Street and the suburb, Fyansford.   Around the Grampians there is Lake Fyans and Fyans Creek.

BALYANG, RESIDENCE OF FOSTER FYANS c1851. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H88.21/107 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/71805

William CARMICHAEL:  Died May 1890 at Macarthur.  William lived at Harton Hills, near Macarthur.  According to his obituary, William purchased the property in 1843 from squatter James Hunter.  However, the Macarthur Historical Society website states William bought the property from the Bolden brothers in 1842.  Any wonder William’s  obituary notes there were “many and varied stories” about how he acquired Harton Hills.

Captain Alexander CAMPBELL:  Died May 25, 1890 at South Yarra.  Alexander Campbell was born in 1803 in Argyleshire, Scotland and followed his brothers to Tasmania in 1825.  After farming for a few years, Alexander left for Sydney in 1831.  The following year a position in charge of the whaling station at Portland was offered to him but he didn’t take up the role until 1836.  In the meantime he went whaling, sailing as far as Japan.  After Portland, he went on to Port Fairy where he stayed for about 15 years.  In that time he built at least two cottages, one occupied by his sisters.  In 1851, he became a harbour master and later moved to Gippsland where he returned to farming.  In his last years, Alexander and his wife moved to Caroline Street, South Yarra where  he died aged 87.

Captain David FERMANER:  Died May, 1893 at Newport.  Earlier this year I wrote a Trove Tuesday post entitled Gilding the Lily.  Captain David Fermaner may have been guilty of just that.   At the time of his death, Fermaner, a whaler,  was credited as being Victoria’s earliest colonist and that he was standing on the beach at Lady Bay when the ship carrying the first Henty’s reached the Victorian coastline.  However, after reading  Jenny Williams Fawcett’s account of David Fermaner and his link to the legend of the Mahogany Ship, it became obvious telling the truth was not one of his strong points.

CAPTAIN DAVID FERMANER. Image courtesty of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H2889/85 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/68327

After his time in the south-west, Fermaner later became pilot and harbourmaster at Port Albert in Gippsland.

William Thomas PILE:  Died May 25, 1901 at Portland.  William Pile was born in Devonshire, England and as a boy served an apprenticeship in the fishing industry at Hull.  With an urge to see the world, he became a sailor and in 1852, his ship “Cossepore” arrived at Portland, but he travelled on to Geelong and like many other ships’ crew he left and headed to the diggings.   The thrill of the high seas and travel was a greater lure and he returned to England.  It was not until 1854 on a return visit to Portland, he decided to settle.

William’s working life in Portland started as a fisherman and in 1869 after a trip home to England, he returned with a new type of gun to harpoon whales.  He bought into a wattle bark business with Stephen Jarrett that proved lucrative. In 1876 William became a Portland Councillor and then Portland Mayor in 1880 and 1886.

Stephen DUDDEN:  Died May 2, 1903 at Hamilton.  Stephen Dudden was born in Somersetshire around 1819 and arrived in Victoria in the 1860s.  Stephen showed some entrepreneurial skills setting up a refreshment tent opposite the Hamilton Lands office, in Brown Street, during the rush to buy land after the passing of the Land Act in 1860.  He later went  to Portland working as a stonemason and then retired to Myamyn.  In the month prior to his death, a dehydrated and disheveled Stephen was found by a Hamilton policeman and taken to the Hamilton Hospital where he remained until he passed away from senile decay.

Janet MILLAR:  Died May 3, 1910 at Portland.  Janet’s obituary named her only as Mrs Browning, so I turned to the Australian Death Index to find her birth name, Janet Millar.  Janet and her husband  John Browning arrived in Victoria in 1849 and headed to Portland to set up a school.  With the discovery of gold, the school was abandoned and the Brownings headed for the diggings.  They returned to Portland and eventually John set up another school, John Browning’s Boarding School for Boys.

Janet was 88 at the time of her death and had kept relatively good health and was still tending her home.  However it was a once in a lifetime chance to see Halley’s Comet in 1910 that led to her demise.  She had been out early on cold mornings trying to catch a glimpse of the comet and developed a chill, too much for her weak heart.

Laurence FINN:  Died May 24, 1914 at Port Fairy.  Laurence Finn from Tipperary, Ireland arrived in Melbourne with his parents in 1841 and in 1843 they settled in Port Fairy.  In 1858, Laurence married Ellen Crowe (Australian Marriage Index) and they took up residence at Comely Banks, Port Fairy.  Laurence’s father ran the Belfast Inn for a time until he let the lease lapse.   As a the only child from his father’s second marriage, Laurence and his children inherited a large amount of land.  Laurence was a Justice of the Peace and was a member of the Port Fairy Agriculture Society.

John McCOMBE:  Died May 7, 1916 at Casterton.  Fourteen year old, John McCombe arrived in Melbourne aboard the Champion of the Seas in 1854.  His family headed directly to Portland but John soon moved on to the Casterton district taking up work at Dunrobin and Nangeela.  He purchased a bullock team and began a carrying business and moved to Sandford around 1861 after he married.  Four years later he bought land at Deep Creek, Corndale and he remained there until his death.

Frederick  Sunderland Wood MAWSON:  Died May 19, 1916 at Geelong.  Frederick Mawson was a dentist and he travelled the Western District and  Mt. Gambier inspecting the teeth of the residents.  Born around 1843 (Australian Death Index), Frederick studied dentistry in England and practiced in Yorkshire.  After acquiring the necessary qualifications for Australia, Frederick set up practice in Geelong and for a few years had a practice in Mt Gambier.

DENTISTRY. (1914, April 2). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 1 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74760513

DENTISTRY. (1914, April 2). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 1 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74760513

This “advertorial” from the Border Watch gives a good description of Frederick Mawson and his dentistry.

dentist1

F. J. Mawson,. (1899, April 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4 Supplement: Supplement to the BORDER WATCH. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81713460

F. J. Mawson,. (1899, April 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4 Supplement: Supplement to the BORDER WATCH. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81713460

 

Mr George Deihl McCORMICK: Died May 29, 1916 at Warrnambool.  Born in Toronto, Canada, George McCormick arrived in Victoria in 1852.  He farmed and apparently  became a part owner of Cobb & Co. coaches.  While I can’t find evidence of this claim, George did know a lot about Cobb & Co. as recorded in his reminisces from 1902 with a writer from the Warrnambool Standard.  The article also appeared in the Portland Guardian of January 20, 1902

mccorm mccorm1 mccorm2

This is a perfect opportunity to show a Cobb & Co. coach and the Leviathan coach, introduced in 1862, was the height of madness.  Smaller coaches would have been scary enough to ride in as they hurtled along unmade roads.  But a coach for 89 passengers.  What were they thinking?  George’s account above mentions the perils facing the Leviathan coach, but it was not the risk that proved them unsuccessful.  Rather, the driver’s whip could not reach the front horses, so a bag of stones were carried to throw at the leaders.

COBB & CO COACH WITH 89 PASSENGERS.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H4051 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72175

COBB & CO COACH WITH 89 PASSENGERS. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H4051 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72175

George became a police magistrate in 1882 and purchased Bournfield Park Estate at Woodstock near Whittlesea and in 1889 he arrived in Warrnambool.  He remained there until his death.  He left a wife, Barbara Waddell and five sons and four daughters.

 John James VILLIERS:  Died May 1917 at Warrnambool.  London born John Villiers was a talented man.  He arrived in Victoria in 1858 aged around 17 and headed to the diggings.  In the early 1860s he went to Warrnambool and his obituary in the Argus May 12, 1917 said he ran a painting and decorating business in Libeig Street and imported crockery.  John’s  interest in painting went beyond house painting.  He enjoyed painting landscapes in oils and watercolours and once he presented a painting to the Warrnambool Art Gallery.

A man of the arts, John was also an amateur dramatic and vocal performer and organised dramatic events to raise money for the likes of the Warrnambool Hospital and the Mechanics Institute.  John was a part of the earliest known sound recording in Australia by Warrnambool shoe shop owner, Thomas Rome on one of the first Edison phonographs.  John Villiers sang the The Hen Convention and if you click on the link, you can hear the song.  More information about Thomas Rome and John Villiers and their recordings can be found in a story by ABC Southwest from 2010.

Sarah BARKER:  Died May 1917 at Ararat.  Most months I can find a pioneer that I have even just a tenuous family link to.  This month it is Sarah Barker.  Sarah was the mother of Stephen Ward.  Stephen married Isabella Harman, daughter of James Harman.  I didn’t know that Sarah Jerrett, as she was in her obituary, was formally Sarah Ward and Sarah Baker.  When I read the obituary however, it mentioned the Ward connection and her son Stephen.

Sarah, from Norfolk, England and her first husband James Ward , arrived at Portland in 1852.  She was 23.  Sarah remained there until the late 1890s when she moved to Ararat.  Prior to that  Sarah and James had seven children. including second youngest Stephen in 1867.  James died in 1879 and Sarah married Francis Jerrett in 1883.

John GURRY:  Died May 24, 1917 at Condah.  John Gurry and his wife left Ireland for Portland in 1857.  They tried Harrow and Branxholme, running the Western Hotel there,  then settled in Condah where John ran a farm.  In their later years, they moved into the Condah township.  John was buried in a family grave at Portland.

OBITUARY. (1917, May 28). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88021627

OBITUARY. (1917, May 28). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88021627

Adam EDGAR:  Died May 8, 1941 at Tapanui, New Zealand.  At the age of six, Adam arrived in Portland aboard the Severn in 1857 with his parents, James and Isabella and his eight siblings.  The family went straight to “Pine Hills”  Harrow the property of James Edgar’s brother, David.  Like his cousins and siblings, he was educated at the private school David Edgar had established at Pine Hills.  In 1871,  Adam married Margaret Huston and in 1875, they left for New Zealand where they stayed for the rest of their lives.  One of Adam and Margaret’s sons was the Reverend James. Huston Edgar, an explorer, missionary and author who spent much of his life in China. His obituary is below.   Adam’s sister Jean Edgar was a Passing Pioneer from March 2012.

MR. J. H. EDGAR DEAD. (1936, April 6). The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36803018

MR. J. H. EDGAR DEAD. (1936, April 6). The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 – 1954), p. 14. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36803018

Captain Robert Ernest BAKER:  Died May 4 at Larpent,  What an interesting character Captain Baker was.  Not a ship’s captain, but a captain in the AIF during WW1 he served with the 8th Light Horse.  Reading his 88 page service record, I found that Baker was actually a Lieutenant when delisted and was a just temporary Captain at one time during his service.  “Captain” does have a better ring to it.

This wonderful photo from the Australian War Memorial has a real Western District flavour but sadly only one, Robert Baker, returned.  Captain Baker is seated on the left.  He was 41 at the time of enlistment.  The other men are, seated right:  Keith Allan Borthwick of Armadale.  Standing from left:  Major Thomas Harold Redford of Warrnambool, Lt Edward Ellis Henty of Hamilton, Lt Eliot Gratton Wilson of Warrnambool.

Edward Ellis Henty was the grandson of Stephen George Henty.  He,  Borthwick, Redford and Wilson joined up on the same day, September 21, 1914 and all died on the same day, August 7, 1915 at the battle of The Nek at Gallipoli.  Robert Baker’s war was plagued with illness, including dysentery and lumbago, but it probably saved his life.  On August 7, 1915, he was in the No 1 Australian Stationary Hospital on Mudros.

Image Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P00265.001 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P00265.001

Image Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P00265.001 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P00265.001

After the war, Captain Baker transformed his property at Larpent into a sanctuary for the native fauna.  He often contributed to the Nature Notes in the Argus.

NOTES FOR BOYS. (1930, September 9). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 9. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189243

NOTES FOR BOYS. (1930, September 9). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 9. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189243

In 1936, he offered kangaroos from his own sanctuary to the Healesville sanctuary.  Healesville Sanctuary was in its first years as it was officially opened in 1934.

Healesville Shire Council. (1936, May 2). Healesville and Yarra Glen Guardian (Vic. : 1900 - 1942), p. 3. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60453763

Healesville Shire Council. (1936, May 2). Healesville and Yarra Glen Guardian (Vic. : 1900 – 1942), p. 3. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60453763

Herbert Edward RIPPON:  Died May 19, 1954 at Hamilton.  Herbert Rippon was the son of George Rippon, part owner of the Hamilton Spectator Herbert lived at Edradour, a house on Ballarat Road, Hamilton I must have passed a thousand times.  Photos of Edradour can be seen on a Hamilton real estate agency listing.  Herbert inherited ownership of the Hamilton Spectator in 1899.  The Victorian Heritage Database has a short bio on Herbert and he was one of the original backers of Sir Reginald Ansett, then a Hamilton resident.  He also was a director of John Thompson & Co department store of Hamilton.


Burial Sites

Family historians love a cemetery, but how do you find the cemeteries where your ancestors have been laid to rest?  If you are lucky enough to have Western District Families, there are two great sites available to help the search.

BYADUK CEMETERY

BYADUK CEMETERY

CEMETERIES OF S.W. VICTORIA

I have used this site, created by Ian Marr, for years and it has done much to help me track down my family members.  Ian has visited what seems like every cemetery in the Western District, from the big ones such as Warrnambool and Hamilton to little ones in paddocks.  He has recorded the details from the headstones and compiled them in an easy to use website.  Not only that, Ian describes each cemetery, gives directions, facilities available and contact details.

The small cemeteries are interesting.  There are Aberfoyle Station, Casterton Swamp and McNeil’s Paddock cemeteries, each with one or two burials on private property.  Some of the names are great such as Lemon Springs and Moonlight Head cemeteries.

The site allows searches by surname or cemetery name.  If you choose a surname search, click on the relevant letter then scroll the names to find your own.  All cemeteries where the name appears are listed beside each surname and you can click through to the cemetery from there.

The 16  largest cemeteries lists are not available online, but Ian has compiled  a range of DVDs and USBs of the entire collection or individual cemeteries  to buy.  These also have photos of headstones from many of the cemeteries.  The name search results on the website will still show a surname match for any of those 16 cemeteries.

If you prefer to browse by cemetery, simply click the cemetery name and a list of names will appear.  Click on your surname and it will go to all matching surnames at that cemetery.

Some of the headstones have researcher links too, so you could find someone else researching your name.  Or add your own contact details on a headstone as I have done for James Harman in the Byaduk Cemetery and William Hadden in the Cavendish Cemetery.

KIRKWOOD HEADSTONE-HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY

KIRKWOOD HEADSTONE-HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY

CAROL’S HEADSTONES

Carol’s Headstones offers photographs from cemeteries from mostly Victoria, but also N.S.W., South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia.  The main page lists the available cemeteries.  Click on a cemetery and a list of headstones will come up.  If you email Carol, she will kindly return a photo of your selected headstone.

I have made use of this fantastic service offered by Carol and received headstone photos of Julia Holmes (nee Harman) from Casterton Cemetery and Amelia Bell (nee Harman) from the Heywood Cemetery.

While there are common cemeteries to Cemeteries of  S.W. Victoria, what you can’t find on one you may find with Carol.  Also it is possible to see a headstone list for Camperdown and Casterton, for example, that are only available on the DVD/USB version of Cemeteries of  S.W. Victoria.

Carol’s Headstones has a War Memorial Index too.  Some of the Western District memorials include Branxholme and Hotspur and there plenty of new entries.

Carol has a blog, Carol’s Headstone Photographs so you can keep track of cemeteries or War Memorials as they become available.

What strikes me about both websites is the amount of work Ian and Carole put in to deliver us a fabulous free service.  Thank you to both of them.

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY


Trove Tuesday – Whispering Wedding Bells

An interesting piece for Trove Tuesday this week.  From February 4, 1882, The Portland Guardian reported on some hush-hush weddings in the district with the information provided by an “esteemed occasional contributor”.  The weddings were happening but the wedding bells were not ringing.  Not only that, one groom baked his own wedding cake.

An article such as this is most useful to the researcher.  It has names, place names, marriages and religious denomination

weddings1

weddings2

The Guardian. (1882, February 4). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: MORNING.. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63403448

I think Father O’Donoghue might have been ready for a lie down.  All those weddings and he was doing his own housework after his housekeeper, Miss Lavery was also “united in the holy bond”.  In case you were wondering, Miss Lavery’s new husband, John Quinlivan, did not bake the wedding cake just because he fancied himself as a cook… he was a  baker.

PORTLAND PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. (1890, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63626245

PORTLAND PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. (1890, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63626245


The General Hewitt – Portland Bay 1856

When I read pioneer’s obituaries, a ship comes up time and again, the General Hewitt.  The ship, also called the General Hewett, was a convict ship and later an immigrant ship, sailing to Moreton Bay in 1854 .  The voyage I will focus on was to Portland Bay in  1856.  And what a voyage it was.

On May 5, 1856 the Geelong Advertiser’s correspondent in London wrote:

LONDON. (1856, July 16). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 2 Edition: DAILY. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93142901

LONDON. (1856, July 16). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), p. 2 Edition: DAILY. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93142901

The General Hewitt left Plymouth, England on July 5, 1856 and arrived at Portland on October 9, 1856.   Many of  the passengers would become some of the finest pioneers of the Western District and the South-East of South Australia and beyond.  A mix of English, Scottish and Irish, the passengers were described as being “of a very useful and eligible class”

gh1

The General Hewitt also carried much needed supplies from the home country, whiskey, brandy, gin and champagne.  There was also some practical cargo such as clothing and haberdashery, garden seeds and glassware.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567020

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567020

The single females from the ship were available to hire from £15 to £26 for a domestic.  Married couples could be employed at a rate of £40-£45 .  While most of the immigrants were “suitable” there were some crew members that were not, resulting in an eventful voyage, with a mutiny attempt no less.

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567019

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567019

The drama did not stop once the ship arrived at Portland Bay.  Four crew members, left the ship on a raft.  Ten others had been locked up and five on the ship were refusing to work.

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

On October 14, the two men accused with assault , William Jose and Joseph Barrow appeared in the Portland Police Court, as did the 10 men refusing duty.  Their names included Able Seamen  Millard, Gash, Parry, Gudridge, Gashar and Howson the sail maker.  They received four months hard labour.

gh9

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 15). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567037

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 15). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567037

The General Hewitt’s arrival was kept the Police Court busy.  On October 15, one of the immigrants, Henry Haley appeared for being found in the Government Immigration Depot without permission.  Four more crewmen appeared for refusing duty, Daniel Newbury, Joseph Steel, George Rumbellow and William Dowell.  Their sentences ranged from 12 weeks to four months imprisonment.

The trial of William Jose and Joseph Barrow for the assault on Captain Christopher H. Loutitt continued.

gh4 gh5

gh6

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

Advertising. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567048

Advertising. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567048

The General Hewitt was already low on crew when, on November 7, two more absconded, the steward, William Thomas an John Carroll the cook.  They had the diggings in their sights, but instead they ended up digging roads.

POLICE COURT. (1856, November 10). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567197

POLICE COURT. (1856, November 10). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567197

A Police Constable kept watch on board the General Hewitt to  prevent any more crew jumping ship.  Captain Loutitt travelled to Melbourne in search of more crew.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7140721

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7140721

Sixty-two years after the arrival of the General Hewitt, the death of John. S Andrew aka John Forster, brought to light more about the crew of the General Hewitt.  John Andrew was a crew member that bolted, ending up at Muntham near Casterton, were he remained for the rest of his life.  According to John’s obituary, other men of the district that were members of the crew included Messers Rooking and Gasperino.

gh17

Passed Away. (1918, October 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222260

Passed Away. (1918, October 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222260

The obituary of William Rooking outed by John Andrew as an escaped crewmen

OBITUARY. (1901, June 14). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73027645

OBITUARY. (1901, June 14). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73027645

Now to the passengers.  As I’m currently tied to home, I didn’t think I could get access to the General Hewitt’s passenger list, so I thought I would find some of the passengers using Trove and a bit of Googling followed by a cross check with the PROV Online Shipping records.  While I did not come close to the “363 souls” on board, I did find around 70. Some of  those continued to live in the Western District or just across the border in the South East of South Australia.

Then, a need to double cross check  and a feeling of guilt about omitting the other 290 or so passengers, I thought I would give Ancestry.com.au a go.  Using the Victoria, Australia , Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists 1839-1923, I searched with General Hewitt in the Keywords field and the year 1856 and the list came up.  Early excitement faded rapidly when I realised the work another 290 names was going to bring and the transcribing of the passenger list was far from perfect.  The Cameron family had become the Cameau family, to name just one discrepancy.

As I’ve pottered away on this post for a few weeks, I have decided to just feature those passengers that had their voyage on the General Hewitt mentioned in their obituaries, plus a couple of others I found on the Glenelg and Wannon Settlers site.  Maybe, one day when I am stuck for something to do, I may start working my way through the other “souls” and share them with you.

ARTHUR, JOHN & PHILLIPPA   – John and Phillippa Arthur did not stay in Victoria long after their arrival, moving to Callington about 60 kilometres east of Adelaide. PROV Passenger List Index:  http://tinyurl.com/c8a8jfj

OBITUARY. (1912, August 3). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 42. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88699759

OBITUARY. (1912, August 3). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), p. 42. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88699759

ELIAS AND JOHN BATESON:  Elias and John from Cambridgeshire took up work with Edmund Kirby (father of John Kirby) at “Spring Bank” near Sandford. PROV Passenger Index: http://tinyurl.com/am9k8f7

BEST FAMILY:  William and Letitia  Best and their family of seven children were from County Cavan, Ireland and settled at Heywood.   PROV record – http://tinyurl.com/c2l5ekh

The obituaries of three of the children follow:

John was 20 at the time of his arrival at Portland.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1907, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63967003

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1907, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63967003

Margaret Best married James Bell a member of another of Heywood’s pioneering families.

OBITUARY. (1933, September 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64283449

OBITUARY. (1933, September 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64283449

Letitia Best married Donald Rankin.  After her marriage she lived in Harrow, Western Australia and Heywood.

OBITUARY. (1941, August 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64401403

OBITUARY. (1941, August 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64401403

COULSON FAMILY – Christopher and Mary Frances Coulson were originally from Yorkshire and later London.  They sailed on the General Hewitt with their four children aged 4 to 14 .  I have previously written about Christopher in the post  I Wish I Were Related To Christopher Coulson.  One of their sons, Francis married my ggg aunt, Harriet Martha Diwell, daughter of William and Margaret.  PROV Passenger Index:  http://tinyurl.com/babw5x2

The obituary of Christopher Coulson Snr.

PERSONAL. (1904, July 28). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4991780

PERSONAL. (1904, July 28). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1931), p. 6. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4991780

Passed Away. (1916, April 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74485266

Passed Away. (1916, April 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74485266

BREEZE FAMILY:  Or is it the Breese family?  As listed on the PROV Index, Thomas and Ann Breeze and their children were aboard the General Hewitt.  However the following letter indicates their name have been Breese.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/avj5sse

The letter is from William G. Breese, son of Thomas and Ann.  William was just seven when he arrived at Portland Bay, but 73 years later he was able to recount the voyage particularly the attempted mutiny.

gh48gh49

Nautical History. (1929, April 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269148

Nautical History. (1929, April 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269148

DWYER, EDMOND – I am yet to find the fate of the General Hewitt , however Edmond Dwyer’s obituary states the ship was destroyed by fire after one more trip to Australia.  The General Hewitt did make one other trip to Australia landing at  Port Adelaide in 1858.

Edmond’s obituary is also useful in that it mentions other passengers on the ship  – the Heaneys and Messers Roulston and Waters.  I can find each of these passengers but I cannot find a passenger under the name of Cannon he mentions.

There were three other Dwyers on the General Hewitt, but I have not been able to find if they are linked to Edmond.  They were:  Catherine (22), Johanna (27), Denis (29)

PROV record http://tinyurl.com/azt5jac

gh19

Obituary. (1930, March 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64291851

Obituary. (1930, March 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64291851

HADDEN, David and Mary –   Listed on the Passenger list as Haddon, David and settled in the Carapook area.  PROV Link http://tinyurl.com/asvck8q

HEANEY, Robert and Jane – From Ireland, Robert and Jane pioneered at Condah for 52 years.  PROV Link http://tinyurl.com/a5rgakf

Infections Diseases in Animals. (1890, August 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629135

Infections Diseases in Animals. (1890, August 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629135

Passing of the Pioneers. (1920, February 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64020779

Passing of the Pioneers. (1920, February 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64020779

LAVERY Family:    Patrick and Rose and children Ann, Mary and Bernard were from County Armagh, Ireland.   PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/ba6juo3

Patrick and Rose celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1900.

SOCIAL. (1900, February 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75063691

SOCIAL. (1900, February 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75063691

Obituary of Patrick Lavery.

OBITUARY. (1905, November 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72818770

OBITUARY. (1905, November 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72818770

Rose Lavery passed away only days before her fellow General Hewitt shipmate, Mary Lear (below).

OBITUARY. (1903, August 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72841100

OBITUARY. (1903, August 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72841100

LEAR FAMILY:  Thomas and Mary and their children William, Thomas and Mary were from Devon, England.  They had another seven children after their arrival.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/cdeuklp

There was a “take two” with Thomas Lear’s obituary.  The Gymbowen correspondent wrote an obituary published in the Horsham Times on February 18, 1919.  The issue of February 21, 1919 set a few facts straight.

Obituary. (1919, February 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993062

Obituary. (1919, February 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993062

Obituary. (1919, February 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved March 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993152

Obituary. (1919, February 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved March 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993152

 McCABE, John and Mathilda:  John and Mathilda, from Ireland, had 10 children after their arrival in Victoria.  They settled in the Sandford district.    PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/d785kzx

McLACHLAN, Mary and Alexander :  The interesting thing about Mary McLachlan’s obituary, that appeared in many newspapers, is that it names her as a passenger on the General Hewitt, with her son.  However I can find Alexander on the passenger list but not Mary.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/d39sg4u

PERSONAL. (1900, January 15). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1931), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29526830

Alexander passed away only six months after his mother.

MR. A. MACLACHLAN. (1900, June 27). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81040451

MR. A. MACLACHLAN. (1900, June 27). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81040451

McCANN, PETER AND JANE and MARY SMITH McCANN:  Peter and Jane were from Ireland and settled around Sandford.  Mary Smith McCANN also sailed with Peter and Jane.  I am not sure if she was a daughter of the couple as she was six, Peter was 22 and Jane was 30.   PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/botobco

McFARLANE FAMILY:  Andrew and Jane and children George, Elizabeth, Margaret and unnamed infant.  The McFarlanes did not linger in Victoria very long, moving first to Sydney and later Brisbane.  Their first child born after they moved to Queensland was the first child born in Queensland after its proclamation.  PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/c3kx3dk

PASSING OF THE PIONEERS. (1913, December 20). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), p. 238. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22219423

PASSING OF THE PIONEERS. (1913, December 20). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 – 1939), p. 238. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22219423

The McFarlanes also offer a lesson:  Even though a person/s disembarked in a particular port, it does not mean they stayed in that general area or even that state.  The McFarlane’s made it from Victoria to Queensland after only two years in the Australia.

MACKINNON, Lachlan:  Lachlan MacKinnon, originally from Argyllshire, Scotland, arrived with his wife and frankly, proving he was on the General Hewitt has almost done my head in.  He does not come up in a search on the PROV Index, in fact no MacKinnons do.  There are McKinnons that sailed on the General Hewitt, but no Lachlans.

Looking to the Ancestry.com.au index, there was a Lachlan McKenzie and several other McKenzies with christian names the same as the McKinnons found on the PROV Index.  The PROV Index has no McKenzies arriving in 1856.  Given the aforementioned dependencies at Ancestry, do I assume the McKenzies are McKinnons and the Lachlan McKinnon listed is really Lachlan MacKinnon?

gh36, gh37

OBITUARY. (1906, September 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583891

OBITUARY. (1906, September 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583891

 

McKINNON FAMILY:  John and Catherine and their children PROV Index  http://tinyurl.com/bn45olf 

NEATE FAMILY:  James and Anne and children Margaret, Julia, Emily, Henry, Albert and Catherine.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/ad5l7hu

No Title. (1909, May 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63988049

No Title. (1909, May 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63988049

POLAND, William and Eliza.  William and Eliza arrived in Portland with an infant and went on to have another six children and became two of Portland’s best known pioneers.  William esd the manager of “Burswood” owned by Edward Henty.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/clrhd58

gh46

 

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1912, October 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003159

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1912, October 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003159

 

ROULSTON, ROBERT AND JOSEPH:  Trying to pin down Robert and Joseph was difficultEdmond Dwyer mentioned the Roulstons as shipmates and name being well known in the Condah district.  There were also Roulstons at Heywood and I found a reference to that family and the Heaney’s (above).  The Heaney family lived in Heywood for 10 years after arriving on the General Hewitt then moved north to Condah.  Robert and Joseph appear on the PROV Index as Roulstone: http://tinyurl.com/az4b9mt

Heywood's Pioneers. (1938, September 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64280358

Heywood’s Pioneers. (1938, September 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64280358

 

STARK, JAMES AND ELIZABETH :  Newlyweds James and Elizabeth spent their first years in Australia at Penola, South Australia before moving to Lake Mundi near Casterton.  PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/d8n7h6t

OBITUARY. (1917, April 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77664546

OBITUARY. (1917, April 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77664546

WATERS, JOHN and ELLEN: John and Ellen are on the index as Walters.  They settled in the Nareen district.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/av27lhf

CONCERNING PEOPLE. (1913, April 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59253916

CONCERNING PEOPLE. (1913, April 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59253916

PORTLAND RED CROSS. (1917, May 10). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675915

PORTLAND RED CROSS. (1917, May 10). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675915

WATERS, MALACHI AND MARYMalachi and Mary moved around, firstly to Horsham for work and later Portland, Digby and finally Wallacedale. PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/av27lhf

Established August 1842. The Portland Guardian,. (1902, March 12). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63992048

Established August 1842. The Portland Guardian,. (1902, March 12). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63992048

WILSON, Robert:  Robert sailed with his sister Mary Ann on the General Hewitt.  A year later Mary Ann had already lost track of her brother.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/a48edrr

Advertising. (1857, September 4). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64569266

If one of your family members sailed on the 1856 voyage to Portland Bay on the General Hewitt, please let me know in the comments.

SOURCES:

Ancestry.com.au

Glenelg and Wannon Settlers

Victorian Public Record Office  – Index to British Assisted Immigration 1839-1871

Trove Digitised Newspapers


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 158 other followers

%d bloggers like this: