Tag Archives: Portland

Passing of the Pioneers

Welcome to a bumper May Passing of the Pioneers.  So many interesting pioneers passed in  the month of May,  I had to leave some for next year.  Those that remain had such great stories that it was necessary to share some extra bits and pieces found about them.  Some just passed through the Western District from time to time, others lived there only for a short period while others were residents for over 50 years, but they all left their mark in some way.    They include army captains, ship captains, a dentist and a naturalist.

Captain Foster FYANS:  Died May 23, 1870 at Newtown.  Western Victorian historian, Margaret Kiddle, wrote in her book Men of Yesterday: a social history of the Western District of Victoria (1834-1890) “the story of  Foster Fyans’ commissionership is a joy to historians” (p.50) . Born in Dublin, Ireland, Foster Fyans was an army captain.  He enlisted in 1816 and served with different regiments of the British army including a stint in India.  On arrival in Australia in 1833, he became the captain of the guard on Norfolk Island and remained there for two years.  In 1837, he left the army and headed to Port Phillip to become the first police magistrate at Geelong.

From 1840, Foster Fyans held the important position of  Crown Lands Commissioner for the Portland Bay area.   A squatter taking up land had to seek permission from the Commissioner and pay an annual fee.  The Commissioner’s word was law and there was no arguing with Foster Fyans, a man with a temper.  He tangled with many squatters including the Hentys.  Governor  La Trobe had his moments with Fyans and Kiddle cites La Trobe declaring Fyans “secured to him the chance of a duel once at least in the week as long as he may live” (p.50).

As commissioner, Fyans would ride great distances from Geelong through to Portland and into the Wimmera, a formidable task but his skills marking out selections  may not have been as great  according to Richard Bennett’s Early Days in Port Fairy (edited by Jan Critchett).  Fyans’ marking of runs “amounted to almost a farce” as Bennett  described the technique used by Fyans:

They were usually laid off in ten mile blocks, measured with a compass in his hand, and timing his horse.  A blackfellow followed, and notched a tree line.  When the Commissioner had travelled what he considered the distance, he notched a corner tree with a broad arrow, and then rode off again at right angles to the next corner, and so on round the block.  Captain Fyans was a bluff old gentleman…” (p.26).

Despite his ways, Fyans was kept on as Commissioner because their was no one else qualified to do the job.

THE LATE CAPTAIN FYANS. (1870, June 18). Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875), p. 114. Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60449034

THE LATE CAPTAIN FYANS. (1870, June 18). Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 – 1875), p. 114. Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60449034

Foster Fyans died at Balyang (below) in the Geelong suburb of Newtown and while the house was demolished in 1896, the site is now a part of the Balyang sanctuary. Around the Geelong area the Fyans name is still present with Fyans Street and the suburb, Fyansford.   Around the Grampians there is Lake Fyans and Fyans Creek.

BALYANG, RESIDENCE OF FOSTER FYANS c1851. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H88.21/107 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/71805

William CARMICHAEL:  Died May 1890 at Macarthur.  William lived at Harton Hills, near Macarthur.  According to his obituary, William purchased the property in 1843 from squatter James Hunter.  However, the Macarthur Historical Society website states William bought the property from the Bolden brothers in 1842.  Any wonder William’s  obituary notes there were “many and varied stories” about how he acquired Harton Hills.

Captain Alexander CAMPBELL:  Died May 25, 1890 at South Yarra.  Alexander Campbell was born in 1803 in Argyleshire, Scotland and followed his brothers to Tasmania in 1825.  After farming for a few years, Alexander left for Sydney in 1831.  The following year a position in charge of the whaling station at Portland was offered to him but he didn’t take up the role until 1836.  In the meantime he went whaling, sailing as far as Japan.  After Portland, he went on to Port Fairy where he stayed for about 15 years.  In that time he built at least two cottages, one occupied by his sisters.  In 1851, he became a harbour master and later moved to Gippsland where he returned to farming.  In his last years, Alexander and his wife moved to Caroline Street, South Yarra where  he died aged 87.

Captain David FERMANER:  Died May, 1893 at Newport.  Earlier this year I wrote a Trove Tuesday post entitled Gilding the Lily.  Captain David Fermaner may have been guilty of just that.   At the time of his death, Fermaner, a whaler,  was credited as being Victoria’s earliest colonist and that he was standing on the beach at Lady Bay when the ship carrying the first Henty’s reached the Victorian coastline.  However, after reading  Jenny Williams Fawcett’s account of David Fermaner and his link to the legend of the Mahogany Ship, it became obvious telling the truth was not one of his strong points.

CAPTAIN DAVID FERMANER. Image courtesty of the State Library of Victoria Image no. H2889/85 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/68327

After his time in the south-west, Fermaner later became pilot and harbourmaster at Port Albert in Gippsland.

William Thomas PILE:  Died May 25, 1901 at Portland.  William Pile was born in Devonshire, England and as a boy served an apprenticeship in the fishing industry at Hull.  With an urge to see the world, he became a sailor and in 1852, his ship “Cossepore” arrived at Portland, but he travelled on to Geelong and like many other ships’ crew he left and headed to the diggings.   The thrill of the high seas and travel was a greater lure and he returned to England.  It was not until 1854 on a return visit to Portland, he decided to settle.

William’s working life in Portland started as a fisherman and in 1869 after a trip home to England, he returned with a new type of gun to harpoon whales.  He bought into a wattle bark business with Stephen Jarrett that proved lucrative. In 1876 William became a Portland Councillor and then Portland Mayor in 1880 and 1886.

Stephen DUDDEN:  Died May 2, 1903 at Hamilton.  Stephen Dudden was born in Somersetshire around 1819 and arrived in Victoria in the 1860s.  Stephen showed some entrepreneurial skills setting up a refreshment tent opposite the Hamilton Lands office, in Brown Street, during the rush to buy land after the passing of the Land Act in 1860.  He later went  to Portland working as a stonemason and then retired to Myamyn.  In the month prior to his death, a dehydrated and disheveled Stephen was found by a Hamilton policeman and taken to the Hamilton Hospital where he remained until he passed away from senile decay.

Janet MILLAR:  Died May 3, 1910 at Portland.  Janet’s obituary named her only as Mrs Browning, so I turned to the Australian Death Index to find her birth name, Janet Millar.  Janet and her husband  John Browning arrived in Victoria in 1849 and headed to Portland to set up a school.  With the discovery of gold, the school was abandoned and the Brownings headed for the diggings.  They returned to Portland and eventually John set up another school, John Browning’s Boarding School for Boys.

Janet was 88 at the time of her death and had kept relatively good health and was still tending her home.  However it was a once in a lifetime chance to see Halley’s Comet in 1910 that led to her demise.  She had been out early on cold mornings trying to catch a glimpse of the comet and developed a chill, too much for her weak heart.

Laurence FINN:  Died May 24, 1914 at Port Fairy.  Laurence Finn from Tipperary, Ireland arrived in Melbourne with his parents in 1841 and in 1843 they settled in Port Fairy.  In 1858, Laurence married Ellen Crowe (Australian Marriage Index) and they took up residence at Comely Banks, Port Fairy.  Laurence’s father ran the Belfast Inn for a time until he let the lease lapse.   As a the only child from his father’s second marriage, Laurence and his children inherited a large amount of land.  Laurence was a Justice of the Peace and was a member of the Port Fairy Agriculture Society.

John McCOMBE:  Died May 7, 1916 at Casterton.  Fourteen year old, John McCombe arrived in Melbourne aboard the Champion of the Seas in 1854.  His family headed directly to Portland but John soon moved on to the Casterton district taking up work at Dunrobin and Nangeela.  He purchased a bullock team and began a carrying business and moved to Sandford around 1861 after he married.  Four years later he bought land at Deep Creek, Corndale and he remained there until his death.

Frederick  Sunderland Wood MAWSON:  Died May 19, 1916 at Geelong.  Frederick Mawson was a dentist and he travelled the Western District and  Mt. Gambier inspecting the teeth of the residents.  Born around 1843 (Australian Death Index), Frederick studied dentistry in England and practiced in Yorkshire.  After acquiring the necessary qualifications for Australia, Frederick set up practice in Geelong and for a few years had a practice in Mt Gambier.

DENTISTRY. (1914, April 2). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 1 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74760513

DENTISTRY. (1914, April 2). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 1 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74760513

This “advertorial” from the Border Watch gives a good description of Frederick Mawson and his dentistry.

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F. J. Mawson,. (1899, April 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4 Supplement: Supplement to the BORDER WATCH. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81713460

F. J. Mawson,. (1899, April 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4 Supplement: Supplement to the BORDER WATCH. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81713460

 

Mr George Deihl McCORMICK: Died May 29, 1916 at Warrnambool.  Born in Toronto, Canada, George McCormick arrived in Victoria in 1852.  He farmed and apparently  became a part owner of Cobb & Co. coaches.  While I can’t find evidence of this claim, George did know a lot about Cobb & Co. as recorded in his reminisces from 1902 with a writer from the Warrnambool Standard.  The article also appeared in the Portland Guardian of January 20, 1902

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This is a perfect opportunity to show a Cobb & Co. coach and the Leviathan coach, introduced in 1862, was the height of madness.  Smaller coaches would have been scary enough to ride in as they hurtled along unmade roads.  But a coach for 89 passengers.  What were they thinking?  George’s account above mentions the perils facing the Leviathan coach, but it was not the risk that proved them unsuccessful.  Rather, the driver’s whip could not reach the front horses, so a bag of stones were carried to throw at the leaders.

COBB & CO COACH WITH 89 PASSENGERS.  Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H4051 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72175

COBB & CO COACH WITH 89 PASSENGERS. Image courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image No. H4051 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/72175

George became a police magistrate in 1882 and purchased Bournfield Park Estate at Woodstock near Whittlesea and in 1889 he arrived in Warrnambool.  He remained there until his death.  He left a wife, Barbara Waddell and five sons and four daughters.

 John James VILLIERS:  Died May 1917 at Warrnambool.  London born John Villiers was a talented man.  He arrived in Victoria in 1858 aged around 17 and headed to the diggings.  In the early 1860s he went to Warrnambool and his obituary in the Argus May 12, 1917 said he ran a painting and decorating business in Libeig Street and imported crockery.  John’s  interest in painting went beyond house painting.  He enjoyed painting landscapes in oils and watercolours and once he presented a painting to the Warrnambool Art Gallery.

A man of the arts, John was also an amateur dramatic and vocal performer and organised dramatic events to raise money for the likes of the Warrnambool Hospital and the Mechanics Institute.  John was a part of the earliest known sound recording in Australia by Warrnambool shoe shop owner, Thomas Rome on one of the first Edison phonographs.  John Villiers sang the The Hen Convention and if you click on the link, you can hear the song.  More information about Thomas Rome and John Villiers and their recordings can be found in a story by ABC Southwest from 2010.

Sarah BARKER:  Died May 1917 at Ararat.  Most months I can find a pioneer that I have even just a tenuous family link to.  This month it is Sarah Barker.  Sarah was the mother of Stephen Ward.  Stephen married Isabella Harman, daughter of James Harman.  I didn’t know that Sarah Jerrett, as she was in her obituary, was formally Sarah Ward and Sarah Baker.  When I read the obituary however, it mentioned the Ward connection and her son Stephen.

Sarah, from Norfolk, England and her first husband James Ward , arrived at Portland in 1852.  She was 23.  Sarah remained there until the late 1890s when she moved to Ararat.  Prior to that  Sarah and James had seven children. including second youngest Stephen in 1867.  James died in 1879 and Sarah married Francis Jerrett in 1883.

John GURRY:  Died May 24, 1917 at Condah.  John Gurry and his wife left Ireland for Portland in 1857.  They tried Harrow and Branxholme, running the Western Hotel there,  then settled in Condah where John ran a farm.  In their later years, they moved into the Condah township.  John was buried in a family grave at Portland.

OBITUARY. (1917, May 28). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88021627

OBITUARY. (1917, May 28). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 23, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88021627

Adam EDGAR:  Died May 8, 1941 at Tapanui, New Zealand.  At the age of six, Adam arrived in Portland aboard the Severn in 1857 with his parents, James and Isabella and his eight siblings.  The family went straight to “Pine Hills”  Harrow the property of James Edgar’s brother, David.  Like his cousins and siblings, he was educated at the private school David Edgar had established at Pine Hills.  In 1871,  Adam married Margaret Huston and in 1875, they left for New Zealand where they stayed for the rest of their lives.  One of Adam and Margaret’s sons was the Reverend James. Huston Edgar, an explorer, missionary and author who spent much of his life in China. His obituary is below.   Adam’s sister Jean Edgar was a Passing Pioneer from March 2012.

MR. J. H. EDGAR DEAD. (1936, April 6). The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36803018

MR. J. H. EDGAR DEAD. (1936, April 6). The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 – 1954), p. 14. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36803018

Captain Robert Ernest BAKER:  Died May 4 at Larpent,  What an interesting character Captain Baker was.  Not a ship’s captain, but a captain in the AIF during WW1 he served with the 8th Light Horse.  Reading his 88 page service record, I found that Baker was actually a Lieutenant when delisted and was a just temporary Captain at one time during his service.  “Captain” does have a better ring to it.

This wonderful photo from the Australian War Memorial has a real Western District flavour but sadly only one, Robert Baker, returned.  Captain Baker is seated on the left.  He was 41 at the time of enlistment.  The other men are, seated right:  Keith Allan Borthwick of Armadale.  Standing from left:  Major Thomas Harold Redford of Warrnambool, Lt Edward Ellis Henty of Hamilton, Lt Eliot Gratton Wilson of Warrnambool.

Edward Ellis Henty was the grandson of Stephen George Henty.  He,  Borthwick, Redford and Wilson joined up on the same day, September 21, 1914 and all died on the same day, August 7, 1915 at the battle of The Nek at Gallipoli.  Robert Baker’s war was plagued with illness, including dysentery and lumbago, but it probably saved his life.  On August 7, 1915, he was in the No 1 Australian Stationary Hospital on Mudros.

Image Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P00265.001 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P00265.001

Image Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P00265.001 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P00265.001

After the war, Captain Baker transformed his property at Larpent into a sanctuary for the native fauna.  He often contributed to the Nature Notes in the Argus.

NOTES FOR BOYS. (1930, September 9). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 9. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189243

NOTES FOR BOYS. (1930, September 9). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 9. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189243

In 1936, he offered kangaroos from his own sanctuary to the Healesville sanctuary.  Healesville Sanctuary was in its first years as it was officially opened in 1934.

Healesville Shire Council. (1936, May 2). Healesville and Yarra Glen Guardian (Vic. : 1900 - 1942), p. 3. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60453763

Healesville Shire Council. (1936, May 2). Healesville and Yarra Glen Guardian (Vic. : 1900 – 1942), p. 3. Retrieved May 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60453763

Herbert Edward RIPPON:  Died May 19, 1954 at Hamilton.  Herbert Rippon was the son of George Rippon, part owner of the Hamilton Spectator Herbert lived at Edradour, a house on Ballarat Road, Hamilton I must have passed a thousand times.  Photos of Edradour can be seen on a Hamilton real estate agency listing.  Herbert inherited ownership of the Hamilton Spectator in 1899.  The Victorian Heritage Database has a short bio on Herbert and he was one of the original backers of Sir Reginald Ansett, then a Hamilton resident.  He also was a director of John Thompson & Co department store of Hamilton.


Burial Sites

Family historians love a cemetery, but how do you find the cemeteries where your ancestors have been laid to rest?  If you are lucky enough to have Western District Families, there are two great sites available to help the search.

BYADUK CEMETERY

BYADUK CEMETERY

CEMETERIES OF S.W. VICTORIA

I have used this site, created by Ian Marr, for years and it has done much to help me track down my family members.  Ian has visited what seems like every cemetery in the Western District, from the big ones such as Warrnambool and Hamilton to little ones in paddocks.  He has recorded the details from the headstones and compiled them in an easy to use website.  Not only that, Ian describes each cemetery, gives directions, facilities available and contact details.

The small cemeteries are interesting.  There are Aberfoyle Station, Casterton Swamp and McNeil’s Paddock cemeteries, each with one or two burials on private property.  Some of the names are great such as Lemon Springs and Moonlight Head cemeteries.

The site allows searches by surname or cemetery name.  If you choose a surname search, click on the relevant letter then scroll the names to find your own.  All cemeteries where the name appears are listed beside each surname and you can click through to the cemetery from there.

The 16  largest cemeteries lists are not available online, but Ian has compiled  a range of DVDs and USBs of the entire collection or individual cemeteries  to buy.  These also have photos of headstones from many of the cemeteries.  The name search results on the website will still show a surname match for any of those 16 cemeteries.

If you prefer to browse by cemetery, simply click the cemetery name and a list of names will appear.  Click on your surname and it will go to all matching surnames at that cemetery.

Some of the headstones have researcher links too, so you could find someone else researching your name.  Or add your own contact details on a headstone as I have done for James Harman in the Byaduk Cemetery and William Hadden in the Cavendish Cemetery.

KIRKWOOD HEADSTONE-HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY

KIRKWOOD HEADSTONE-HAMILTON OLD CEMETERY

CAROL’S HEADSTONES

Carol’s Headstones offers photographs from cemeteries from mostly Victoria, but also N.S.W., South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia.  The main page lists the available cemeteries.  Click on a cemetery and a list of headstones will come up.  If you email Carol, she will kindly return a photo of your selected headstone.

I have made use of this fantastic service offered by Carol and received headstone photos of Julia Holmes (nee Harman) from Casterton Cemetery and Amelia Bell (nee Harman) from the Heywood Cemetery.

While there are common cemeteries to Cemeteries of  S.W. Victoria, what you can’t find on one you may find with Carol.  Also it is possible to see a headstone list for Camperdown and Casterton, for example, that are only available on the DVD/USB version of Cemeteries of  S.W. Victoria.

Carol’s Headstones has a War Memorial Index too.  Some of the Western District memorials include Branxholme and Hotspur and there plenty of new entries.

Carol has a blog, Carol’s Headstone Photographs so you can keep track of cemeteries or War Memorials as they become available.

What strikes me about both websites is the amount of work Ian and Carole put in to deliver us a fabulous free service.  Thank you to both of them.

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY

OLD PORTLAND CEMETERY


Trove Tuesday – Whispering Wedding Bells

An interesting piece for Trove Tuesday this week.  From February 4, 1882, The Portland Guardian reported on some hush-hush weddings in the district with the information provided by an “esteemed occasional contributor”.  The weddings were happening but the wedding bells were not ringing.  Not only that, one groom baked his own wedding cake.

An article such as this is most useful to the researcher.  It has names, place names, marriages and religious denomination

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The Guardian. (1882, February 4). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: MORNING.. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63403448

I think Father O’Donoghue might have been ready for a lie down.  All those weddings and he was doing his own housework after his housekeeper, Miss Lavery was also “united in the holy bond”.  In case you were wondering, Miss Lavery’s new husband, John Quinlivan, did not bake the wedding cake just because he fancied himself as a cook… he was a  baker.

PORTLAND PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. (1890, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63626245

PORTLAND PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. (1890, January 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 11, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63626245


The General Hewitt – Portland Bay 1856

When I read pioneer’s obituaries, a ship comes up time and again, the General Hewitt.  The ship, also called the General Hewett, was a convict ship and later an immigrant ship, sailing to Moreton Bay in 1854 .  The voyage I will focus on was to Portland Bay in  1856.  And what a voyage it was.

On May 5, 1856 the Geelong Advertiser’s correspondent in London wrote:

LONDON. (1856, July 16). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 2 Edition: DAILY. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93142901

LONDON. (1856, July 16). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), p. 2 Edition: DAILY. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93142901

The General Hewitt left Plymouth, England on July 5, 1856 and arrived at Portland on October 9, 1856.   Many of  the passengers would become some of the finest pioneers of the Western District and the South-East of South Australia and beyond.  A mix of English, Scottish and Irish, the passengers were described as being “of a very useful and eligible class”

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The General Hewitt also carried much needed supplies from the home country, whiskey, brandy, gin and champagne.  There was also some practical cargo such as clothing and haberdashery, garden seeds and glassware.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567020

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567020

The single females from the ship were available to hire from £15 to £26 for a domestic.  Married couples could be employed at a rate of £40-£45 .  While most of the immigrants were “suitable” there were some crew members that were not, resulting in an eventful voyage, with a mutiny attempt no less.

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567019

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, October 13). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567019

The drama did not stop once the ship arrived at Portland Bay.  Four crew members, left the ship on a raft.  Ten others had been locked up and five on the ship were refusing to work.

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

On October 14, the two men accused with assault , William Jose and Joseph Barrow appeared in the Portland Police Court, as did the 10 men refusing duty.  Their names included Able Seamen  Millard, Gash, Parry, Gudridge, Gashar and Howson the sail maker.  They received four months hard labour.

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POLICE COURT. (1856, October 15). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567037

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 15). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567037

The General Hewitt’s arrival was kept the Police Court busy.  On October 15, one of the immigrants, Henry Haley appeared for being found in the Government Immigration Depot without permission.  Four more crewmen appeared for refusing duty, Daniel Newbury, Joseph Steel, George Rumbellow and William Dowell.  Their sentences ranged from 12 weeks to four months imprisonment.

The trial of William Jose and Joseph Barrow for the assault on Captain Christopher H. Loutitt continued.

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POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

POLICE COURT. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567053

Advertising. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567048

Advertising. (1856, October 17). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567048

The General Hewitt was already low on crew when, on November 7, two more absconded, the steward, William Thomas an John Carroll the cook.  They had the diggings in their sights, but instead they ended up digging roads.

POLICE COURT. (1856, November 10). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567197

POLICE COURT. (1856, November 10). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64567197

A Police Constable kept watch on board the General Hewitt to  prevent any more crew jumping ship.  Captain Loutitt travelled to Melbourne in search of more crew.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7140721

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1856, November 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7140721

Sixty-two years after the arrival of the General Hewitt, the death of John. S Andrew aka John Forster, brought to light more about the crew of the General Hewitt.  John Andrew was a crew member that bolted, ending up at Muntham near Casterton, were he remained for the rest of his life.  According to John’s obituary, other men of the district that were members of the crew included Messers Rooking and Gasperino.

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Passed Away. (1918, October 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222260

Passed Away. (1918, October 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly.. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74222260

The obituary of William Rooking outed by John Andrew as an escaped crewmen

OBITUARY. (1901, June 14). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73027645

OBITUARY. (1901, June 14). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73027645

Now to the passengers.  As I’m currently tied to home, I didn’t think I could get access to the General Hewitt’s passenger list, so I thought I would find some of the passengers using Trove and a bit of Googling followed by a cross check with the PROV Online Shipping records.  While I did not come close to the “363 souls” on board, I did find around 70. Some of  those continued to live in the Western District or just across the border in the South East of South Australia.

Then, a need to double cross check  and a feeling of guilt about omitting the other 290 or so passengers, I thought I would give Ancestry.com.au a go.  Using the Victoria, Australia , Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists 1839-1923, I searched with General Hewitt in the Keywords field and the year 1856 and the list came up.  Early excitement faded rapidly when I realised the work another 290 names was going to bring and the transcribing of the passenger list was far from perfect.  The Cameron family had become the Cameau family, to name just one discrepancy.

As I’ve pottered away on this post for a few weeks, I have decided to just feature those passengers that had their voyage on the General Hewitt mentioned in their obituaries, plus a couple of others I found on the Glenelg and Wannon Settlers site.  Maybe, one day when I am stuck for something to do, I may start working my way through the other “souls” and share them with you.

ARTHUR, JOHN & PHILLIPPA   – John and Phillippa Arthur did not stay in Victoria long after their arrival, moving to Callington about 60 kilometres east of Adelaide. PROV Passenger List Index:  http://tinyurl.com/c8a8jfj

OBITUARY. (1912, August 3). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 42. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88699759

OBITUARY. (1912, August 3). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), p. 42. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88699759

ELIAS AND JOHN BATESON:  Elias and John from Cambridgeshire took up work with Edmund Kirby (father of John Kirby) at “Spring Bank” near Sandford. PROV Passenger Index: http://tinyurl.com/am9k8f7

BEST FAMILY:  William and Letitia  Best and their family of seven children were from County Cavan, Ireland and settled at Heywood.   PROV record – http://tinyurl.com/c2l5ekh

The obituaries of three of the children follow:

John was 20 at the time of his arrival at Portland.

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1907, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63967003

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1907, October 14). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63967003

Margaret Best married James Bell a member of another of Heywood’s pioneering families.

OBITUARY. (1933, September 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64283449

OBITUARY. (1933, September 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64283449

Letitia Best married Donald Rankin.  After her marriage she lived in Harrow, Western Australia and Heywood.

OBITUARY. (1941, August 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64401403

OBITUARY. (1941, August 25). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64401403

COULSON FAMILY – Christopher and Mary Frances Coulson were originally from Yorkshire and later London.  They sailed on the General Hewitt with their four children aged 4 to 14 .  I have previously written about Christopher in the post  I Wish I Were Related To Christopher Coulson.  One of their sons, Francis married my ggg aunt, Harriet Martha Diwell, daughter of William and Margaret.  PROV Passenger Index:  http://tinyurl.com/babw5x2

The obituary of Christopher Coulson Snr.

PERSONAL. (1904, July 28). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4991780

PERSONAL. (1904, July 28). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1931), p. 6. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4991780

Passed Away. (1916, April 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74485266

Passed Away. (1916, April 10). The Casterton News and the Merino and Sandford Record (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 3 Edition: Bi-Weekly. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74485266

BREEZE FAMILY:  Or is it the Breese family?  As listed on the PROV Index, Thomas and Ann Breeze and their children were aboard the General Hewitt.  However the following letter indicates their name have been Breese.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/avj5sse

The letter is from William G. Breese, son of Thomas and Ann.  William was just seven when he arrived at Portland Bay, but 73 years later he was able to recount the voyage particularly the attempted mutiny.

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Nautical History. (1929, April 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269148

Nautical History. (1929, April 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64269148

DWYER, EDMOND – I am yet to find the fate of the General Hewitt , however Edmond Dwyer’s obituary states the ship was destroyed by fire after one more trip to Australia.  The General Hewitt did make one other trip to Australia landing at  Port Adelaide in 1858.

Edmond’s obituary is also useful in that it mentions other passengers on the ship  – the Heaneys and Messers Roulston and Waters.  I can find each of these passengers but I cannot find a passenger under the name of Cannon he mentions.

There were three other Dwyers on the General Hewitt, but I have not been able to find if they are linked to Edmond.  They were:  Catherine (22), Johanna (27), Denis (29)

PROV record http://tinyurl.com/azt5jac

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Obituary. (1930, March 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64291851

Obituary. (1930, March 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64291851

HADDEN, David and Mary –   Listed on the Passenger list as Haddon, David and settled in the Carapook area.  PROV Link http://tinyurl.com/asvck8q

HEANEY, Robert and Jane – From Ireland, Robert and Jane pioneered at Condah for 52 years.  PROV Link http://tinyurl.com/a5rgakf

Infections Diseases in Animals. (1890, August 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629135

Infections Diseases in Animals. (1890, August 20). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63629135

Passing of the Pioneers. (1920, February 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64020779

Passing of the Pioneers. (1920, February 5). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64020779

LAVERY Family:    Patrick and Rose and children Ann, Mary and Bernard were from County Armagh, Ireland.   PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/ba6juo3

Patrick and Rose celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1900.

SOCIAL. (1900, February 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75063691

SOCIAL. (1900, February 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75063691

Obituary of Patrick Lavery.

OBITUARY. (1905, November 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72818770

OBITUARY. (1905, November 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72818770

Rose Lavery passed away only days before her fellow General Hewitt shipmate, Mary Lear (below).

OBITUARY. (1903, August 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72841100

OBITUARY. (1903, August 11). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72841100

LEAR FAMILY:  Thomas and Mary and their children William, Thomas and Mary were from Devon, England.  They had another seven children after their arrival.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/cdeuklp

There was a “take two” with Thomas Lear’s obituary.  The Gymbowen correspondent wrote an obituary published in the Horsham Times on February 18, 1919.  The issue of February 21, 1919 set a few facts straight.

Obituary. (1919, February 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993062

Obituary. (1919, February 18). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993062

Obituary. (1919, February 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved March 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993152

Obituary. (1919, February 21). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved March 9, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72993152

 McCABE, John and Mathilda:  John and Mathilda, from Ireland, had 10 children after their arrival in Victoria.  They settled in the Sandford district.    PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/d785kzx

McLACHLAN, Mary and Alexander :  The interesting thing about Mary McLachlan’s obituary, that appeared in many newspapers, is that it names her as a passenger on the General Hewitt, with her son.  However I can find Alexander on the passenger list but not Mary.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/d39sg4u

PERSONAL. (1900, January 15). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 – 1931), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29526830

Alexander passed away only six months after his mother.

MR. A. MACLACHLAN. (1900, June 27). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81040451

MR. A. MACLACHLAN. (1900, June 27). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81040451

McCANN, PETER AND JANE and MARY SMITH McCANN:  Peter and Jane were from Ireland and settled around Sandford.  Mary Smith McCANN also sailed with Peter and Jane.  I am not sure if she was a daughter of the couple as she was six, Peter was 22 and Jane was 30.   PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/botobco

McFARLANE FAMILY:  Andrew and Jane and children George, Elizabeth, Margaret and unnamed infant.  The McFarlanes did not linger in Victoria very long, moving first to Sydney and later Brisbane.  Their first child born after they moved to Queensland was the first child born in Queensland after its proclamation.  PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/c3kx3dk

PASSING OF THE PIONEERS. (1913, December 20). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), p. 238. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22219423

PASSING OF THE PIONEERS. (1913, December 20). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 – 1939), p. 238. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22219423

The McFarlanes also offer a lesson:  Even though a person/s disembarked in a particular port, it does not mean they stayed in that general area or even that state.  The McFarlane’s made it from Victoria to Queensland after only two years in the Australia.

MACKINNON, Lachlan:  Lachlan MacKinnon, originally from Argyllshire, Scotland, arrived with his wife and frankly, proving he was on the General Hewitt has almost done my head in.  He does not come up in a search on the PROV Index, in fact no MacKinnons do.  There are McKinnons that sailed on the General Hewitt, but no Lachlans.

Looking to the Ancestry.com.au index, there was a Lachlan McKenzie and several other McKenzies with christian names the same as the McKinnons found on the PROV Index.  The PROV Index has no McKenzies arriving in 1856.  Given the aforementioned dependencies at Ancestry, do I assume the McKenzies are McKinnons and the Lachlan McKinnon listed is really Lachlan MacKinnon?

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OBITUARY. (1906, September 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583891

OBITUARY. (1906, September 5). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77583891

 

McKINNON FAMILY:  John and Catherine and their children PROV Index  http://tinyurl.com/bn45olf 

NEATE FAMILY:  James and Anne and children Margaret, Julia, Emily, Henry, Albert and Catherine.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/ad5l7hu

No Title. (1909, May 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63988049

No Title. (1909, May 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 17, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63988049

POLAND, William and Eliza.  William and Eliza arrived in Portland with an infant and went on to have another six children and became two of Portland’s best known pioneers.  William esd the manager of “Burswood” owned by Edward Henty.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/clrhd58

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First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1912, October 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003159

First Issue, August 20, 1842. (1912, October 18). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64003159

 

ROULSTON, ROBERT AND JOSEPH:  Trying to pin down Robert and Joseph was difficultEdmond Dwyer mentioned the Roulstons as shipmates and name being well known in the Condah district.  There were also Roulstons at Heywood and I found a reference to that family and the Heaney’s (above).  The Heaney family lived in Heywood for 10 years after arriving on the General Hewitt then moved north to Condah.  Robert and Joseph appear on the PROV Index as Roulstone: http://tinyurl.com/az4b9mt

Heywood's Pioneers. (1938, September 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64280358

Heywood’s Pioneers. (1938, September 29). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64280358

 

STARK, JAMES AND ELIZABETH :  Newlyweds James and Elizabeth spent their first years in Australia at Penola, South Australia before moving to Lake Mundi near Casterton.  PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/d8n7h6t

OBITUARY. (1917, April 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77664546

OBITUARY. (1917, April 28). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77664546

WATERS, JOHN and ELLEN: John and Ellen are on the index as Walters.  They settled in the Nareen district.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/av27lhf

CONCERNING PEOPLE. (1913, April 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59253916

CONCERNING PEOPLE. (1913, April 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 – 1929), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59253916

PORTLAND RED CROSS. (1917, May 10). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675915

PORTLAND RED CROSS. (1917, May 10). Portland Observer and Normanby Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88675915

WATERS, MALACHI AND MARYMalachi and Mary moved around, firstly to Horsham for work and later Portland, Digby and finally Wallacedale. PROV Index http://tinyurl.com/av27lhf

Established August 1842. The Portland Guardian,. (1902, March 12). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63992048

Established August 1842. The Portland Guardian,. (1902, March 12). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63992048

WILSON, Robert:  Robert sailed with his sister Mary Ann on the General Hewitt.  A year later Mary Ann had already lost track of her brother.  PROV Index:  http://tinyurl.com/a48edrr

Advertising. (1857, September 4). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64569266

If one of your family members sailed on the 1856 voyage to Portland Bay on the General Hewitt, please let me know in the comments.

SOURCES:

Ancestry.com.au

Glenelg and Wannon Settlers

Victorian Public Record Office  – Index to British Assisted Immigration 1839-1871

Trove Digitised Newspapers


Autumn Fashion

The first two months of Autumn in the Western District produce some of the year’s best weather.  There are warm days but a chill is felt in the night air.  By May however, we begin to get a taste of what lies ahead with more wet and cold days.

During the mid 19th century, ladies had to rely on reports from London and Paris for their fashion news.

In 1848,   the “London and Paris Ladies Magazine of Fashion” predicted coloured velvet trimmed for Autumn dresses.  Velvet was also a popular for bonnets.

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FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

Bonnets trimmed with  fruit were out for Autumn 1851, but flowers such as forget-me-nots were fashionable.  Dresses with open or short sleeves were accessorised with bracelets, emeralds and “medal” charms the suggestion.

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FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 – 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

The styles for Autumn 1853 changed little from the Spring before.

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 – 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

Sleeves were changing in shape during the mid 1850s.  Also, with the change of season, velvet was replacing ribbon on bonnets.

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4827100

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article482710

 

A sample of Autumn fashion advertisements from the 1860s.

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303
Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

L.Robinson & Co. of Collins Street, Melbourne had the latest imported Paris fashions for Autumn 1870.

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Miss S.H. Heazlewood kept the Portland ladies in the latest styles for Autumn 1884 and she offered a dress making service too.

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Not much has changed almost 130 years on.

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

In 1889, furs and cloaks were hitting the shops but outside the weather was anything but cold.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

Two weeks later,  the weather was a little more Autumn like.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

A “pretty” apron from 1892 with a handy pocket and a cheap price tag.

FASHION'S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

FASHION’S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

Colourful straw hats were in vogue for Autumn 1904.

aut19aut20

ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

Jeanne Paquin was a French fashion designer known for her tailored gowns.  In 1905, her influence was evident in the fashions reaching Australian shores.

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WOMAN'S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

WOMAN’S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

The following dress  from 1907, in a chiffon Panama material, gives us some idea of the sewing skills that have sadly been lost today.  Horsham ladies did not have to go to the city to buy such a dress.  They could order a Buttericks  pattern from M. Thorp & Co of Melbourne.

aut25aut26

LADIES' COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

LADIES’ COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

Shades of purple were popular in 1913, especially for hats and veils.

aut28aut29

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

By 1914, Horsham ladies not handy with the needle were able to buy fashion equal to their city counterparts without leaving town.

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

Those that suffered for fashion’s sake, would have pleased to see the back of the tight skirt.

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

Autumn hats for 1917 had few trimmings, although the white felt hat embroidered with Greek dancing-girls sounds far from plain.

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

By the end of January 1917, autumn and winter clothing was appearing in the shops, the last thing shoppers wanted to see during a hot summer.  Coat frocks were in and the coatee was flattering for ladies of all shapes and sizes.

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WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WW1 limited the supply of precious stones for jewellery, with diamonds becoming rare and in turn expensive.  Charm bracelets and three stone engagement rings were popular and wedding rings had narrowed.  Earrings were rarely worn and when they were they were a simple stud.

Colours were of subdued tones, fitting for the times.  Suits had few trimmings, relying on a smart cut for style.

aut39

WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

Tyler’s of Bridge Street, Ballarat. advertised in the Border Watch of Mt. Gambier a fair distance to travel in 1922 for the latest autumn fashions.

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Some distinctive 1920s styles.

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AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

There was plenty of colour on offer with the Autumn fashions of 1926, from rosewood to smoke greys and everything in between.  Imitation fur trimmings were popular on coats and handbags.

OUR WOMEN'S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

OUR WOMEN’S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

A Coolie coat from 1927.

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FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

Styles from Autumn 1934.

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The Fashion Parade. (1934, February 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 23. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46465428

Geoffrey Turton, aka Petrov, was an Australian magazine illustrator and cartoonist.  He worked on publications such as the Bulletin and Smiths Weekly, but also the Australian Women’s Weekly.  The following is an example of work from the Weekly, depicting Autumn styles from 1935.

aut45

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved March 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

There was plenty of choice available for Autumn 1935, with ladies able to choose the look they preferred.aut46aut47

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

Friday March 19, 1937 was the date for the opening show of E.S. Finkemeyer’s Autumn and Winter fashions.

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

Black worn with accessories in a new red, “rebel red”, was a fashionable look for 1940.

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

A promotion for Australian woollen garments during Autumn 1941.

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

A cardigan perfect for those cooler March evenings.

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

During WW2, when French and Italian fashion houses closed, America came to the forefront of fashion.

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

Sewing patterns from 1945.

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

The following two suits sure have that 1940s war-time look about them.

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman's Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman’s Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

This crêpe dress from 1950 was in contrast to the 1947 fashions, above.

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

In 1955, Tweed fashions for ladies emerged, not just tomboys, as did the jersey dress that washed like a stocking.

TWEED... is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

TWEED… is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

aut67

The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

Max Factor cosmetics were 40 years old when this glamorous Myer advertisement appeared in the Australian Women’s Weekly.  Hollywood starlets such as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor had made red lips sexy.

Aut55

Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Ship Mates

The Casterton Historical Society newsletters, as featured in Nifty Newsletters, ran a series of extracts from the book Tales of Casterton: the Waines murder and other stories by Jack Gorman.  In the September 2005 issue, Part 1 of the story stated that convicted murderer George Waines arrived in Victoria aboard the Duke of Richmond.

This is a particularly interesting find as my ggg grandmother, Margaret Diwell, who appeared as a witness at George’s murder trial, also arrived on the Duke of Richmond, along with her husband William.  This answers the question has to how she came to know the Waines, other than the fact they lived reasonably close together.

I have a database of Duke of Richmond arrivals and  I did a search but no George Waines.  I then went to an online passenger list of the Duke of Richmond that I often refer back to.  No George Waines.

So a-Troving I went.  An article from the Bendigo Advertiser, reporting on the hanging of Waines, supported his arrival on the Duke of Richmond.  But there seems to have been a case of mistaken identity Waines was keen to amend before his death.

EXECUTION OF THE CONVICT WAINES. (1860, July 18). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87945170

EXECUTION OF THE CONVICT WAINES. (1860, July 18). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87945170

I did find a George Waines in the Australian Convict Transportation Registers(1791-1868) .  Convicted in Warwickshire,  he left England for Tasmania in 1843.

Back to the Duke of Richmond passenger list.  George’s wife was Jane so I thought I would look at  first names instead of surnames.  Sure enough, there was a George and Jane Whainer both aged 29 from Yorkshire.  George’s age matches his birth date of 1823, but Yorkshire?  Both the  Casterton Historical Society Newsletter and the article above, state George was born in Dorset, England, with the Bendigo Advertiser narrowing it down to Sherborne.

Back to Trove and look what I found:

POPULATION OF THE GOLDFIELDS. (1860, October 22). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87947401

POPULATION OF THE GOLDFIELDS. (1860, October 22). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87947401

George was from Yorkshire, Sherburn as opposed to Sherborne, Dorset.  This and the claim George “was one of the most notorious poachers in the district” helps support something I found on the England and Wales, Criminal Registers (1791-1892).  In 1849, George Waines of Yorkshire was sentenced to  three months imprisonment on a charge of larceny.  Maybe he wasn’t as squeaky clean as he wanted people to believe.  No matter the impression he tried to project, nothing could save him from the gallows.

Using FreeBDM I found a marriage of  George Waines in 1847, registered in the Scarborough district of Yorkshire.  From the same Volume there are two Janes, Jane Winter and Jane Jewett

That settled, back to the original aim of my post, the friendship between Margaret Diwell and the Waines, particularly Jane.  So it seems they met on the Duke of Richmond, the same ship another set of ggg grandparents sailed on, James and Susan Harman.  The Diwells spent around five years in Portland after arrival, then they went to Casterton in 1858.    The CHS newsletter says  that once in Casterton, the Diwells lived close to both the Waines and the Hunts.  As the Hunts purchased land off George Waines in 1856 at Casterton, the Waines must have arrived in town before the Diwells.

It sounds like Jane Waines would have been a good friend.  The CHS newsletter describes her as “a comely woman, a vivacious personality full of joy and fun…” . George was not described  in such a favourable way, although he did hold Jane in high regard.

EXECUTION OF THE CONVICT WAINES. (1860, July 18). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87945170

EXECUTION OF THE CONVICT WAINES. (1860, July 18). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87945170

Of course I did wonder what happened to Jane after George’s death.  George had thoughts about what she should do.

THE CASTERTON MURDER. (1860, April 30). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 3. Retrieved February 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1204764

THE CASTERTON MURDER. (1860, April 30). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 – 1889), p. 3. Retrieved February 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1204764

On the Victorian Marriage Index, a Jane Waines married Thomas James Brooks in 1861.  From there I lose her.  I can not find a death record for either Jane or a Thomas James Brooks that I can definitely say is them.  I can’t get a lead on the town Jane lived in so that is making it hard to search for her at Trove.  I wonder if she stayed on in Casterton?  Did Margaret Diwell see her again?  Did Margaret and Jane’s relationship falter during the trial period, given Margaret also knew Mrs Hunt well.  So many questions.

As the Harmans were also on the Duke of Richmond, I have a picture in my mind of James Harman, back in 1860 in Port Fairy, looking up from his paper of choice, maybe the Belfast Gazette and remarking “Do you remember the Waines and the Diwells from the ship Susan?”


Portland Pioneer Women’s Book of Remembrance

The obituary of Sarah Jane Wadmore in the January Passing of the Pioneers prompted me to find out more about a booklet she co-authored  for the Portland Centenary in 1934, the Portland Pioneer Women’s Book of Remembrance.  I had previously read about it in newspaper reports from around the time.

Pioneer Women of Portland. (1934, May 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved January 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64285807

Pioneer Women of Portland. (1934, May 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved January 29, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64285807

A  Google search led me to the State Library of Victoria website and it was pleasing to see it has been digitised and is available online.  I was even more pleased that ggg grandmother Margaret Ann Diwell (nee Turner) was among the pioneering women of Portland as well as some of those I have featured in Passing of the Pioneers.

The booklet begins with a forward from Alice Frances Moss, a pioneer of women’s rights.  She was the first President of the National Council of Women of Australia and Chair of the Victorian Women’s Centenary Council.

After an offering of appreciation to pioneer women, there is the story of  Mrs Stephen George Henty, the first European woman at Portland, to whom the booklet was dedicated.  She is often called Mrs Stephen George Henty, but let us call her Jane (Pace).

There are  the recollections of Mrs George Godwin Crouch (Marianne Trangmar) spanning from 1840 to 1917.  Then, a list of “Worthy Pioneers” compiled by Sarah Jane Wadmore.  Included is one of my favourites, Rebecca Kittson (Mrs William Lightbody) and Mrs Fawthrop, Jane Rosevear, wife of Captain James Fawthrop the life boat captain.

Following is the story of  Mrs Richard Charlton Hedditch and further on a letter she wrote on Christmas Day, 1848, to her parents in England.  Another woman often referred to by her husband’s name, she was Rachel Forward Read.

After some local poetry, comes “Belles and Beauties of the Early Days”.  Those included are Misses Henty, Learmonth, Trangmar and Herbertson.

Finally is a list of Portland’s Pioneering Women.  Women born or living in Portland prior to 1864 were eligible.  This is where I found Margaret.  The Diwells lived in Portland for about five years from the time of their arrival on the Duke of Richmond in 1852.

Margaret appears as Mrs William Diwell and her daughter-in-law, Frances Webb,  is also  listed as Mrs William Diwell.  Frances just scraped in as she was born in Portland in 1863 to John Webb and Margaret Smith, who is also listed.   This is a useful list as some entries have notes and maiden names.

The oldest pioneer women, recognized separately,  include Marion Nunn Jones, Emma Holmes and Anne Beglan.

The photographs in the booklet are of Mrs Jane Henty, Mrs Marianne Crouch, Mrs Janet Laurie, Sarah Jane Wadmore and Mrs Rachel Hedditch.

The booklet also comes as a Archive CD book and is available from the Genealogical Society of Victoria.


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