Tag Archives: Wyatt

Passing of the Pioneers

April Passing of the Pioneers includes one of the pioneers of the Presbyterian Church in the Coleraine district, a mother of 14 children, several Shire Councillors and a successful store keeper.

Thomas GOODWIN – Died April 7, 1914 at Rosebrook.  Thomas Goodwin was born in Tasmania about 1833 and arrived at Port Fairy as a child.  He farmed first in the Glenormiston district but when land became available at Farnham, he moved there.  In his later years he farmed at Rosebrook.   He left three sons and four daughters.

Letitia WILLIAMSON – Died April 11, 1914 at Koroit.  Letitia Williamson was born in County Armagh, Ireland.  She arrived in Victoria in 1857 and married James O’Neill in Melbourne the following year.  They spent some time in Melbourne then moved to Koroit where James was a boot maker.  James passed away around 1903 and when Letitia passed away she left six children.

William QUILL – Died April 13, 1914 at Portland.  William Quill was born at Werrangourt Station, Byaduk around 1845, but his family moved to Yambuk when he was a boy.  After his marriage to Miss Doherty, William and his new bride settled at Macarthur.  William was on holiday in Portland when he passed away.

Samuel KEEN – Died April 21, 1914 at Hamilton.  Samuel Keen was born in Stafford, England around 1846 and came to Australia aboard the ship “Helen” about six years later with his parents.  The family travelled to Hamilton by bullock wagon, where Samuel remained for the rest of his life.

Rev. W.J.GILLESPIE- Died April 24, 1914 at Hawthorn.  Reverend Gillespie was born in Antrim, Ireland in 1826 and trained for the ministry in Belfast.  He travelled to Australia in 1867 with his wife of five years, Mary Oliphant Morrison.  The following year he took up position in charge of Coleraine, Casterton, Merino and Digby Churches and remained in that role until 1902.  During his time at Coleraine he was president of the Coleraine debating club, and chairman of the Board of Advice, Mechanics Institute and Railway League.  With his health failing, the Reverend and his wife moved to Melbourne where he remained until his death. He was buried in the Coleraine cemetery.

Mr Arthur Grainger HILL – Died April 7, 1917 at Edenhope.  Arthur Hill was born in Somersetshire, England and when he arrived in Australia he first settled in N.S.W.  He came to Victoria to work with the Railway Department of Victoria.  Around 1880 he was appointed Engineer of the Wannon Shire Council.  Due to  a successful period of employment with the Shire, upon his retirement he was awarded a bonus of a year’s wages.

Mrs Sarah CHAMBERLAIN - Died April 22, 1917 at Hamilton.  Sarah Chamberlain was born in Ireland around 1836 and arrived in Australia in the late 1850s.  She married Peter Lewis and they had two sons, however Peter passed away.  She then married Benjamin Chamberlain of Port Fairy and they had three daughters and one son.  Sarah was buried at the Port Fairy cemetery.

George TRANGMAR – Died April 25, 1917 at Melbourne.  George Trangmar was born in Brighton, England around 1828  and arrived in Victoria in 1849.  He started in business with his brother James in Portland before opening a store in Coleraine in 1851. He remained in business there for 25 years and during that time was a member of the Wannon Shire, including some years as President .  During the 1870s he purchased the Toolang Estate near Coleraine for sheep farming.  He sold Toolang around the turn of the century and moved to Melbourne.  He was buried at Coleraine Cemetery.

Thomas Lewis WYATT – Died April 15, 1918 at Hamilton.  Thomas Wyatt was born in London, England around 1831 and married at St., Brides Church, London in 1853.   In 1855, Thomas and Mrs Wyatt. a young son and Thomas’ brother James, left Plymouth aboard the “Anna Maria“, arriving at Portland in  February 1856.   He took up the trade of plasterer and his work took him to Mt. Gambier and Melbourne, before he went into partnership in Hamilton.  He was a founding member of the Portland Oddfellows lodge.  Thomas left a widow, two sons and three daughters

Johanna STEVEN – Died April 1925 at Heywood.  Johanna Steven was born near Glasgow, Scotland and arrived in Victoria with her parents around 1860.  Mr Steven owned what was known around Portland as the “Wee Station” in South Portland,  a small acreage as up to date as a large pastoral station which attracted visits by tourists to the town.  Johanna married William Reid at Portland and they raised a family of 14 children.  Johanna and William were foundation members of the Heywood Presbyterian Church.

William PHILIP – Died April, 1933 at Hamilton.  William Philip was born around 1858 and was educated at the Hamilton Academy and Geelong College.  After Geelong, he returned to the Western District and owned properties including “Violet Creek“, “Kenilworth” and “Mt. William“.  He was a member of the Dundas Shire Council for 20 years and was a member of the racing, golf and swimming clubs as well as the Masonic Lodge.  His support assisted the financing the Hamilton War Memorial and  local swimming pool.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What Was “Lost” is Now Found

The subject of my 2013 Anzac Day post was great-grandfather Les Combridge.  I wanted to include a photo of Les and I couldn’t get one of Grandmas’ photos in time, but I knew I had a large envelope with information Grandma’s sister Jean had sent me.  There were photos in the envelope but I couldn’t remember if there was one of Les.  Well, I searched everywhere for that envelope and I couldn’t find it.   That’s right, I’m not an organised genealogist and to qualify that, I recently joined a Facebook group The Organized Genealogist.  I doubt it will help me.

Over the past weekend I stumbled across the envelope.  It wasn’t lost.  I always knew it was somewhere.  I just had to find that somewhere.

The envelope has a treasure trove of information about the Combridge family and should have demanded my immediate attention when Auntie Jean first sent it to me.  But you know how easy it is to get sidetracked.  There were no photos of Les.  Instead there was one of his father Herbert John Combridge.

Herbert was born in Geelong in 1873, the youngest of 12 children of John Combridge and Martha Baker.  John and Martha had arrived in Geelong in 1855 from England.  Herbert married Jane Wyatt in 1895 at Kyneton. The minister was Herbert’s brother John Robert Combridge, Church of Christ minister at Kyneton at the time .  Herbert and Jane went back to the Geelong district and my great-grandfather Leslie Herbert Combridge was born in 1897 at Steglitz, west of Geelong.  By 1900, Herbert, Jane and Les had moved to Grantville in Gippsland where the remaining three children to the couple were born.

Herbert Combridge2

HERBERT JOHN COMBRIDGE

On the back of the next photo someone had written”Les and Claude”.  Claude was the younger brother of Les.  However Auntie Jean had written underneath “not Les and Claude”.

Combridge2

She seemed fairly emphatic about that and I do agree with her.  The photo is too early for Les and Claude and there was a 10 year age difference between the two.  Given the photos came from the same source, a cousin of Auntie Jean, and there was also information about the Geelong Combridge’s, Auntie Jean was probably given the photo for a reason.  I suspect this is another photo of Herbert Combridge.

The first step was to follow-up on the  photographer, “Wilmot of Malop Street, Geelong” to establish a time frame.  The Geelong District Local and Family History site includes a useful Geelong and District Photographers Database.  “Wilmot” was George Wilmot, in business in Geelong from 1865-1923.  He started off with William Keys in 1865-1886, then went out on his own in 1886, first in Fyans Street, then from 1891 to 1923 in Malop Street.

From Trove photographs, I knew that when in business with Keys, the business name at the bottom of the photo was “Wilmot and Keys”.  The logo on the border changed a lot over the years and I only found one other with a coat of arms, that being from around 1907.  The photo was likely taken after 1891 when George moved his business from Fyans Street to Malop street.  Herbert was 18 in 1891.

The boy on the right looks younger and I suspect they are brothers.  If  it is Herbert, he’d be on the right as he was the youngest child in the family.  Benjamin was the next eldest by two years.    Benjamin would have been 20 in 1891.  If Herbert, the photo would be from before his marriage in 1897 when Herbert was aged 24.  The time frame would then be 1891-1897.  What do you think?

I know that while I have learnt a lot about Ladies fashion writing seasonal posts that have proved useful when trying to date photos, I don’t know a lot about men’s clothing, so that’s penciled in for a future post.

Of course this may not be Herbert at all.

You may remember from the Anzac Day post that Herbert’s wife Jane died in 1909 as a result of childbirth.  In Auntie Jean’s envelope were two cemetery receipts, a sad reminder of that year.  The first receipt, from July 27, is for the interment of a stillborn baby.  The charge 17/6.  Then from December 14, a receipt for the burial of Jane.  The charge £1.

Combridge1

Now, you’ll be pleased to know,  all the gems in Auntie Jean’s envelope are scanned and the originals in a safe place.  I suppose that’s one step toward being more organised.


Passing of the Pioneers

April Passing of the Pioneers includes members of some of Western Victoria’s well-known pioneering families including Bell, Learmonth, Trigger, Kittson and Coulson.  There is also the great character of Thomas Tattersall of Ararat, a train driving pioneer.

Edwin CUMMINGS:  Died April 2, 1892 at Portland.  Edwin Cummings, originally from Tasmania, had only been in Portland around 16 years but in that time he worked hard to improve his lot.  On his arrival in Portland he ran a successful saw-milling/cabinet making business.  Edwin then moved to farming pursuits.  Using modern farming methods, he was able to improve his holding.  Edwin also lost several adult children to consumption.

Thomas TATTERSALL:  Died April 24, 1894 at Ararat.  Lancashire born Thomas Tattersall died from fish poisoning on his birthday.  He was a pioneering engine driver and his death was recognised by the  Governor of Victoria who sent a telegram of condolence to the Ararat railway station.  Thomas drove the first train from Melbourne to Bendigo and was one of the first drivers to Portland.  He had also driven the train for many dignitaries including the Governor and the Premier of Victoria.

Thomas BROWN:  Died April 1903 at Hamilton.  Thomas Brown went to Hamilton with his parents, after their arrival in Victoria from Scotland in 1852.   Thomas was an elder of the Hamilton Presbyterian Church and a long time member of the Sons of Temperance and was also involved with other temperance movements.  Active in many charities, his obituary noted that the poor of Hamilton had lost a friend in Thomas Brown.

Alfred COWLAND:  Died April 27, 1908 at Casterton.  Alfred Cowland was born in Kent, England and arrived in Victoria around 1858 aged 22.  He travelled with his parents, and Alfred and his father began farming at Greenwalde.  Alfred married the widow of Fred Spencer, but they did not have any children.

Mrs W.H. OSMOND:  Died April 8, 1915 at Port Fairy.  Mrs Osmond’s husband Harry was a partner in Osmond Bros., hotel keepers and butchers.  Mrs Osmond was hostess at the Market Hotel, Port Fairy, and considered  a most popular landlady in the Western District and if the races where on, she was there.

Thomas Ferry PEARSON:  Died April 24, 1915 at Port Fairy.  Thomas Pearson was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England and arrived in Portland in 1852.  He married Jane Strachan there before moving to Port Fairy in 1855.  He went to work on the pilot boats under Captain Mills and then for 13 years was keeper of the Griffiths Island lighthouse.

Francis Stubbs COULSON:  Died April 10, 1916 at Hamilton.  Francis Coulson was the husband of my gg aunt Harriet Martha Diwell.  He was the son of Christopher Coulson and Mary Frances Stubbs and was born in Yorkshire, England in 1842.  He married Harriet in 1873 and they had 13 children.  Francis ran a carrying business between Portland and the inland towns.  He also farmed at “Rosebank” Dwyers Creek and hard work saw him turn it into a “nice property”.

Mrs DIGBY:  Died April 23, 1918 at Port Fairy.  Mrs Digby was born in Somersetshire, England and arrived in Victoria in 1852.  Soon after she married Joseph Digby.  They had a large family of nine sons and daughters.  She was 88 at the time of her death.

Kate CUE:  Died April 23, 1917 at Port Fairy.  Kate Cue was from the Casterton district.  Her brother  Tom Cue, a miner, had the town Cue, Western Australia named after him.  She married William Sutherland McPherson of “Nangeela” station, Casterton.  They took up residence in Port Fairy and had seven children.

James MAHONEY:  Died April 27, 1918 at Port Fairy.  James Mahoney of Killarny was a member of one of the oldest families in the district.  He was the son of Mrs Quirk and had three brothers and a sister living at the time of his death aged 69.  James had travelled extensively throughout Australia and never married.

James BELL:  Died April 1923 at Mt. Eckersley.   James Bell was a member of the well known Bell family of Mt Eckersley near Heywood.  James, his parents and siblings arrived in Victoria in 1841 and they settled at Mt Eckersley.  James was the last surviving member of the original family known for their longevity.  James was 97 at the time of his death and his father John Bell lived to 101.

Jonathan HARMAN:  Died April 1930 at Heywood.  Jonathan Harman, my ggg uncle was also from a family known for longevity. He died at the home of his daughter, Amelia, wife of the nephew of James Bell (above).  Jonathan was 92 years old and a colonist of 76 years.

Kate Isabella HILL:  Died April 1934 at Wodonga.  Kate Hill was the daughter of John and Isabella Hill of West Portland.  She was better known as “Kitty Hill” and her and sister Lizzie were household names in their early days.  John Hill was a local school teacher.  Kitty married William Smith of Wodonga and was 75 years old when she died.

Alexander MOTT:  Died April 12, 1934 at Casterton.  Alexander was born in Millicent, South Australia and went to the Casterton district in the early 1900s.  He farmed at Carapook and Bahgallah before settling in the Casterton township.  His wife predeceased him and he left seven sons and daughters.

Mary Simpson LEARMONTH:  Died April 2, 1939 at Hamilton.  Mary Learmonth was from one well-known Hamilton family and married into another when she wed David Laidlaw.  Mary was the daughter of Peter Learmonth of “Prestonholme” Hamilton.   David’s father was David Laidlaw, a saddler who arrived in Hamilton with no money and become one of the town’s most prominent citizens.

Mary was quite the sportswoman and was 17 times female champion of the Hamilton Golf Club.  This was according to her obituary in the Portland Guardian however her obituary in The Argus of April 4, 1939 states she was club champion 39 times.   She was also a talented tennis and croquet player.  Other than sport, Mary was president of the Australian  Women’s National League prior to her death and was a member of the Hamilton Horticulture Society.

Mary died at her home “Eildon” on the corner of Thompson and French Street Hamilton.  Everyone who has lived in Hamilton will know the Laidlaw’s former home, just on the edge of the CBD and overlooking the Hamilton Botanic Gardens.  The house, designed by Ussher and Kemp, was sold after Mary’s death to the Napier Club, a club formed by the female counterparts of the Hamilton Club.  The club, formed around 1931, still occupies “Eildon” today.

"Eildon", Hamilton

“Eildon”, Hamilton

Alice M. WYATT:  Died April 23, 1940 at Hamilton.  Alice Wyatt, the daughter of Mr and Mrs T.L. Wyatt, spent her childhood in Portland before moving to Hamilton around 1878 when she was 20.  She did spend some time in Melbourne working for Sir Edward Miller and his wife Lady Mary Miller.  Sir Edward was a politician who made his money in finance and pastoral pursuits.  Alice spent the last 25 years of her life in Hamilton.

Irwin BELL:  Died April 1940 at Hamilton.  Irwin Bell of Dartmoor was a son of James Bell (above).  Irwin was born in Portland around 1874 and lived at Mt Eckersley until the Bell family property was sold.  He married Ann Letts of Heywood and together they led a life dedicated to the Church of England.  They established the first Sunday School at Dartmoor and prepared parishioners for their first communion.  Irwin also worked for the Department of Forestry and in later years was a Justice of the Peace.  He died at KiaOra Hospital in Hamilton and was buried at Heywood cemetery.

James TRIGGER:  Died April 25, 1945 at Macarthur. James Trigger was the son of Samuel and Eliza Trigger of Warrabkook near Macarthur.  Born in 1859, James selected land at Mt Eccles at a young age and he farmed there for the duration of his life.

OBITUARY. (1945, May 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved April 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64404393

OBITUARY. (1945, May 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved April 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64404393

James was interested in horse racing and was an owner of a number of horses.  He left a widow and a son and daughter.

Mr R.S. KITTSON:  Died April 8, 1948 at Lower Cape Bridgewater.  Stephen Kittson was the son of James Kittson and Catherine Trotter and the last surviving member of the first family of Kittsons to arrive at Cape Bridgewater.  A deeply religious man, he was involved in many church activities.  Having had two sons serve in WW1, Stephen showed an interest in returned servicemen and with his passing “ex-servicemen have lost a loyal friend”

Mary Ann ALLSOP:  Died April 10, 1953 at Port Campbell.  Mary Ann was the daughter of Mr and Mrs Samuel Allsop, pioneers of the Port Campbell district.  She married Thomas Wiggens at Purrumbete.  After the death of Thomas, Mary Ann moved to Camperdown.  She left one son and three daughters and was buried at the Camperdown cemetery.


Surname Saturday Meme: Names, Places and Most Wanted Faces

Following the lead of U.S. genealogist Thomas MacEntee and  in turn Australian genealogist Jill Ball, I decided to take part in this meme.  It interested me more than others I had seen, because not only would I get my names “out there”, I also got the chance to do a stocktake.  What an interesting exercise it was.  With some names, I did not have to look up the details as I knew them so well, others I had to refer back to my tree, and for one name, I had basically nothing.

It’s easy to develop favourite families, with some just oozing information making them more compelling to research.  The Harmans are an example of that.  The Riddiford line was probably my least favourite  and despite it being my family name, I tended to pass it by. When I did starting seriously researching them, I found loads of information.  This avoidance was probably due to them being 20th century immigrants and my history interests lie in 19th century Australia.  I had no choice but to delve into 18th and 19th century English history and I have really enjoyed it and learnt a lot and I continue to do so.  I am glad I got over my previous mindset.

I also have more Irish links than I normally given myself credit for and I can now clearly see the branches I have been neglecting.

I have included the surnames of my great great grandparents, but I have taken the places and dates back a little further.  If not, I would have had entries with just a single place in Australia with no indication of where the family originated from.

To take part, just do the following at your own blog, then post a  link in the comments at Thomas’ blog post

1. List your surnames in alphabetical order as follows:

[SURNAME]: Country, (State or County, Town), date range;

2. At the end, list your Most Wanted Ancestor with details about them.

MY NAMES, PLACES AND MOST WANTED FACES:

BISHOP:  England (Dorset, Weymouth) 1825-1850; Australia (South Australia, Adelaide) 1850-1854;  Australia (Victoria, Byaduk)1854-1950

COMBRIDGE:  England (Huntingdonshire) 1833-1855;  Australia (Victoria, Geelong 1855-1935);  Australia (Victoria, Grantville) 1900-1950

DIWELL:  England (Sussex) 1825-1852;  Australia (Victoria, Casterton) 1852-1893;  Australia (Victoria, Hamilton) 1893-1940

GAMBLE:  England 1808-1840;  Australia (Victoria, Geelong) 1840-1850;  Australia (Victoria, Colac), 1850-present

HADDEN:  Scotland (East Lothian) 1823-1852;  Australia (Victoria, Geelong) 1852-1865;  Australia (Victoria, Cavendish) 1865-1975;  Australia (Victoria, Hamilton) 1900-present

HARMAN:  England (Cambridgeshire, Melbourn) 1800-1854;  Australia (New South Wales) 1852-1857;  Australia (Victoria, Port Fairy) 1852-1863;  Australia (Victoria, Byaduk) 1863-present

HODGINS:  Ireland (Fermanagh) 1816-1853;  Australia (Victoria, Colac) 1853-1940

HUNT:  England (Middlesex, Poplar) 1834-1854;  Australia (Victoria, Geelong) 1854-1865; Australia (Victoria, Collingwood) 1867- ;  Australia (Victoria, West Gippsland) 1880-1936

JELLY:  Ireland (Down, Drumgooland) 1815-1845;  England (Lancashire, Manchester) 1845-1854;  Australia (Victoria, Casterton) 1854-1900

KIRKIN:  England (London, Lambeth) 1859-1940;

MORTIMER:  England (Berkshire, White Waltham) 1823-1852;  Australia (Victoria, Cavendish) 1865-1930

PIDDINGTON:  England (Buckinghamshire, Cuddington) 1700s-1880

RIDDIFORD:  England (Gloucestershire, Thornbury) 1600s-present; England (Buckinghamshire, Cuddington) 1846-present;  England (London, Lambeth) 1896-1913; Australia (Victoria, Ballarat) 1913-present

WEBB:  England (Surrey, Clapham) 1845-1878; England (London, Lambeth) 1878-1900

WHITE:  England (Kent, Broadstairs) 1857-1876;  Australia (Victoria, Grantville) 1876-1950

WYATT:  ???

MOST WANTED ANCESTOR:

When I started this I thought my most wanted ancestor would be gg grandmother Mary Jane HODGINS.  She was born in Ireland around 1849, immigrated with her parents West HODGINS  and Martha BRACKIN in 1853 aboard the “Marion Moore” . She married Matthew GAMBLE in 1871 at Colac.  That is all I know except for the accident which saw Mary Jane loose the top of her finger, as mentioned in the post Misadventures, Deaths and Near Misses.

However, when I looked at the completed list it seemed clear it had to be Jane WYATT, another gg grandmother and second wife of Herbert John COMBRIDGE.

I had previously found a birth for a Jane Wyatt born 1882, St Arnuad but this did not really add up, mainly because my Jane Wyatt married Herbert Combridge in 1895 in Gippsland.  If I searched the Australian Death Index 1787-1985, I find the death of Jane COMBRIDGE in 1909 at Grantville but with no approximate birth year or parents.

As I was writing this post, I decided to have a look around for Jane again.  I checked for people researching Combridges at Ancestry.com and found a reference to Jane’s birth in 1873.  I searched again with this birth date and that threw up something interesting.  There is a Jane Wyatt listed on the Victorian Index to the Children’s Register of State Wards, 1850-1893.  Her birth date is given as 1873, but no birth place.  This could be my Jane and it could explain the lack of parent names  and birth year on the Death index.

So, thanks to this exercise, I may have come a step closer to finding Jane Wyatt, but if she was a ward of the state, I may not be able to find anything else about her.  So if anyone has information on Mary Jane HODGINS and her family, I would love to her from you!


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