Category Archives: Fashion

Winter Fashion

Winter in the Western District can be cold and wet and the southerly winds are freezing.    Frosts are common and snow can fall in some parts, especially around the gold towns of Ararat and Ballarat where sub zero temperatures are frequent.  Winter weather would have reminded the pioneers of home as they donned coats and hats and furs.  Way too many furs. There was an another factor that we don’t face today in quite the same way.  Mud.

SNOW, NORTH BALLARAT (c1900-1906).  Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no: H41033/32 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/55951

SNOW, NORTH BALLARAT. Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria Image no: H41033/32 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/55951

Mud was everywhere in Bendigo in 1856.

HE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (1856, May 28). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88050303

HE BENDIGO ADVERTISER. (1856, May 28). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88050303

The situation was no different in Portland.

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, September 19). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64566835

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. (1856, September 19). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64566835

Winter fashions across the 100 or so years from the 1840s went from heavy velvet dresses to woollen slacks in the 1950s.  Furs of all varieties were popular especially during the 19th century and early 20th century.  Thankfully the wearing of fur is now frowned upon because at the rate it was being worn, all fur-bearing animals would now be extinct.

Early Port Phillip settlers of 1845 had word from London that velvet was the must have fabric for the coming season.  Tunic dresses and double skirts were fashionable.

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FASHIONS FOR JULY IN PORT PHILLIP, OR JANUARY IN ENGLAND. (1845, June 11). Geelong Advertiser and Squatters' Advocate (Vic. : 1845 - 1847), p. 5. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91122789

FASHIONS FOR JULY IN PORT PHILLIP, OR JANUARY IN ENGLAND. (1845, June 11). Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate (Vic. : 1845 – 1847), p. 5. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91122789

Velvet was still in fashion by the end of the 1840s but not at all practical if walking the muddy streets.

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FASHIONS FOR JANUARY. (1849, May 12). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 1 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93133862

FASHIONS FOR JANUARY. (1849, May 12). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 1 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93133862

There was a move away from black and other dark colours in 1851, with materials in sky blue and taffeta in apricot.

SCHEDULE REFERRED TO IN THE ABOVE LETTERS. (1851, May 2). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 4. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4777642

SCHEDULE REFERRED TO IN THE ABOVE LETTERS. (1851, May 2). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4777642

“Brights” of Geelong received their first shipment of Winter goods for 1851 in May.  A case of goods including cuffs, collars and sleeves and a range of fur accessories were on offer including sable, mink and squirrel goods.

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Advertising. (1851, May 20). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 3 Edition: DAILY and MORNING. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91914023

Advertising. (1851, May 20). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 3 Edition: DAILY and MORNING. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91914023

“Brown Brothers” of Geelong offered ladies and children’s boas and cuffs in mink and chinchilla.

Advertising. (1855, May 24). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 4 Edition: DAILY.. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91871285

Advertising. (1855, May 24). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), p. 4 Edition: DAILY.. Retrieved May 22, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91871285

 

Dresses were trimmed with bows, lace, netting and velvet ornaments in the 1860s along with buttons and epaulettes.  Broad boarders at the bottom of the dress could be ornamented with  trimmings An  advantage of the border was that it was easy to freshen up with new materials or trims if it became tatty or mud stained.

FASHIONS FOR JANUARY. (1860, March 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved June 1, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5679112

FASHIONS FOR JANUARY. (1860, March 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 6. Retrieved June 1, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5679112

Large earrings were in vogue during winter, 1866.  Large gold hoops and pear-shaped earrings were available.

THE FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER. (1866, February 1). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64635701

THE FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER. (1866, February 1). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64635701

During the same season, felt bonnets were popular.

FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER. (1866, March 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64635944

FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER. (1866, March 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64635944

 

[No heading]. (1873, May 17). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 - 1889), p. 29. Retrieved June 1, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5985335

[No heading]. (1873, May 17). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 – 1889), p. 29. Retrieved June 1, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5985335

“A. Paton” of Camperdown offered dresses in a range of materials for winter, 1879.

Advertising. (1879, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29098359

Advertising. (1879, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29098359

Patons also sold Dent’s Kid Gloves.  Yes, Dents were going back in the 1870s.  A check of the company website found that Dents gloves were already 100 years old at that time.

Advertising. (1879, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29098359

Advertising. (1879, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29098359

In 1882, dresses in silk were made with jacket bodices.  Bonnets were in the “princess shape” and Newmarket coats were often trimmed with fur.

THE AUSTRALIAN WOMAN'S MAGAZINE. (1882, May 5). Record (Emerald Hill, Vic : 1881 - 1900), p. 3. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108472760

THE AUSTRALIAN WOMAN’S MAGAZINE. (1882, May 5). Record (Emerald Hill, Vic : 1881 – 1900), p. 3. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108472760

“Heazelwoods” of Percy Street, Portland advertised their new winter stock for 1883.  Hats were available in beaver, felt and straw.

Advertising. (1883, July 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71585826

Advertising. (1883, July 19). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71585826

Sealskin was the most popular fur for winter 1894. Silver fox, red fox and blue fox were also used for wraps.  Black furs of lynx and fox were also popular.

The Popular Winter Furs. (1894, October 5). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72947027

The Popular Winter Furs. (1894, October 5). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72947027

The trimming of winter hats with flowers was thought unusual until 1895. Then there were many colours to choose from instead of the usual black, brown and gray.  There was a doctor’s warning with this article – low-cut dresses must not be worn in winter.

WORLD OF FASHION. (1895, June 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: Supplement to the Portland Guardian.. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65400699

WORLD OF FASHION. (1895, June 21). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: Supplement to the Portland Guardian.. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65400699

What a display of fur.

C1890-1918 Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria,  Image No. H2002.42/23  http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/40114

C1890-1918 Image Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria, Image No. H2002.42/23 http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/40114

Women were told to forget furs of the “cat o’-nine-tail’ variety with “glassy eyes, sharp cardboard noses, and wire claws”.  They were no longer “good form”.  That sounded promising for the animals.  No, it wasn’t.  The furs of 1902 were on a “large scale”

WOMAN'S REALM. (1902, November 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 5. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9076147

WOMAN’S REALM. (1902, November 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 5. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9076147

This is an over-blouse an “important” garment from Winter 1908 .  It could be made from a Buttericks pattern.

LADIES' BLOUSE. (1908, April 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72808710

LADIES’ BLOUSE. (1908, April 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72808710

Dimmeys were promoting tailored suits in 1914.  Materials included Donegal Tweeds and velour.

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Advertising. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224396

Advertising. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224396

The young lady from around 1914 wears a fox stole and muffler.  How women ever wore fox furs with the heads with glass eyes, I don’t know.  The closest I’ve come to them has been in antique shops, but after reading the children’s book Grandad’s Gifts by Paul Jennings, I hope I never see another.  If you have read the book, you will know what I mean.

c1914.  Image Courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.  Image No. PRG280/1/11/516 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/searcy/11/PRG280_1_11_516.htm

c1914. Image Courtesy of the State Library of South Australia. Image No. PRG280/1/11/516 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/searcy/11/PRG280_1_11_516.htm

“Langlands” of Horsham were offering more than just “average” garments for winter 1919.

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Advertising. (1919, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73048126

Advertising. (1919, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73048126

In March 1922. the summer goods were cleared from the windows of fashions houses and exchanged with the latest winter fashions.  A coat of velour with fur trimming was expensive, but the velour made the coat as “warm as a blanket”.  Mole coney was popular.  It sounded exotic but it was only wild rabbit dyed in mole colours.

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FASHION FOR THE WEEK. (1922, March 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 4. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4685428

FASHION FOR THE WEEK. (1922, March 15). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4685428

Some typical 1920s fashion.

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WINTER FASHIONS. (1925, July 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 4. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2132544

WINTER FASHIONS. (1925, July 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 4. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2132544

Ostrich feathers were the prediction for winter 1927.  Gone were the days of black or white, all the colours of the rainbow would be available.  Be warned, they only suited the tall and slim.

OSTRICH FEATHER BOAS. (1926, October 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73016017

OSTRICH FEATHER BOAS. (1926, October 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73016017

A range of hats, dresses and coats for winter 1929.

FASHION SHOWS. (1929, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 13. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3996179

FASHION SHOWS. (1929, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 13. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3996179

FASHION SHOWS. (1929, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 13. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3993217

FASHION SHOWS. (1929, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 13. Retrieved June 2, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3993217

There were hats to suit all for winter, 1934.

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The Fashion Parade. (1934, April 21). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 16. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51199094

The Fashion Parade. (1934, April 21). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 16. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51199094

After completing four seasons of fashion, the women of Horsham were the stand outs in the fashion stakes.  Maybe it was because of the range of clothing brought to the town by shops such as Madame Griffiths’ of Firebrace Street.

WINTER FASHIONS. (1934, May 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72582666

WINTER FASHIONS. (1934, May 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72582666

Winter 1935 through the eyes of Petrov.

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BUILD YOUR Winter Wardrobe Round YOUR TOPCOAT. (1935, May 4). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47469903

BUILD YOUR Winter Wardrobe Round YOUR TOPCOAT. (1935, May 4). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47469903

A rather curious type of cape was available for winter 1935.  Made from material akin to that of a “bathing cap”, they were popular because they were light and cheap.  Collars of all sorts were also available, including Peter Pan and those adorned with bows.

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Sundries for Winter Wear. (1935, June 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64289351

Sundries for Winter Wear. (1935, June 6). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING.. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64289351

Cadet Blue, Kenyan Red and Imperial Gold were just some of the wool colours for winter 1936, available in a variety of yarns.

FASHIONS FOR WINTER. (1936, March 9). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64271974

FASHIONS FOR WINTER. (1936, March 9). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64271974

The Fashion Parade. (1937, March 6). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51587259

The Fashion Parade. (1937, March 6). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51587259

During WW2 money was tight and women were advised how they could have a fresh winter wardrobe on a limited budget.  A coat was most important and  clothes from the previous season could be revitalised to save money for a good quality coat.   Cheap materials creased easily and imagine the creases after three hours sitting at the pictures!

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VANITY CORNER. (1941, April 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72691381

VANITY CORNER. (1941, April 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72691381

Tweeds were fashionable for winter 1944.

Tweeds are fashion firsts this winter. (1944, May 27). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 19. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47218844

Tweeds are fashion firsts this winter. (1944, May 27). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 19. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47218844

And tartans for 1949.

Week-end in the country. (1949, April 16). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 11. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47812948

Week-end in the country. (1949, April 16). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 11. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47812948

Hats with a military style were popular for winter 1950, including Light Horse plumes.  Cloche hats and berets were also popular.

NEW WINTER HAT STYLES. (1950, April 7). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801141

NEW WINTER HAT STYLES. (1950, April 7). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801141

Rockmans of Horsham offered bargains galore.

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Advertising. (1953, March 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72766479

Advertising. (1953, March 27). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72766479

Corduroy appeared for winter 1954 in the shape of dresses and tight jeans.   Paisley and leopard print corduroys were available.

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SUEDE COTTON IS EXCITING NEW TOP FASHION FABRIC. (1954, September 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74792605

SUEDE COTTON IS EXCITING NEW TOP FASHION FABRIC. (1954, September 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74792605

After all the furs earlier on, I was a little worried when I read about Poodle cloth coats from Rockmans, Canberra.  They also had a large range of cardigans.

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Advertising. (1958, March 13). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), p. 19. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91245269

Advertising. (1958, March 13). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), p. 19. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91245269

By 1958, a range of wool slacks were available for winter. They were certainly more practical than the dresses female pioneers wore 100 years before.

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Advertising. (1958, May 1). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), p. 20. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91249114

Advertising. (1958, May 1). The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), p. 20. Retrieved May 31, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91249114

 


Autumn Fashion

The first two months of Autumn in the Western District produce some of the year’s best weather.  There are warm days but a chill is felt in the night air.  By May however, we begin to get a taste of what lies ahead with more wet and cold days.

During the mid 19th century, ladies had to rely on reports from London and Paris for their fashion news.

In 1848,   the “London and Paris Ladies Magazine of Fashion” predicted coloured velvet trimmed for Autumn dresses.  Velvet was also a popular for bonnets.

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FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1848, February 1). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91458993

Bonnets trimmed with  fruit were out for Autumn 1851, but flowers such as forget-me-nots were fashionable.  Dresses with open or short sleeves were accessorised with bracelets, emeralds and “medal” charms the suggestion.

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FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

FASHIONS FOR SEPTEMBER. (1850, December 26). The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 – 1880), p. 943. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65576052

The styles for Autumn 1853 changed little from the Spring before.

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

PARIS FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1853, February 12). Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 – 1857), p. 3. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8772971

Sleeves were changing in shape during the mid 1850s.  Also, with the change of season, velvet was replacing ribbon on bonnets.

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4827100

FASHIONS FOR OCTOBER. (1856, January 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article482710

 

A sample of Autumn fashion advertisements from the 1860s.

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 - 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1861, April 5). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2 Edition: EVENINGS.. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65446138

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303

Advertising. (1866, March 15). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87959303
Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

Advertising. (1868, April 9). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 1. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87895148

L.Robinson & Co. of Collins Street, Melbourne had the latest imported Paris fashions for Autumn 1870.

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Advertising. (1870, April 23). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5818692

Miss S.H. Heazlewood kept the Portland ladies in the latest styles for Autumn 1884 and she offered a dress making service too.

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Advertising. (1884, May 17). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63342665

Not much has changed almost 130 years on.

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

Not Possible. (1886, April 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Colac Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article90352809

In 1889, furs and cloaks were hitting the shops but outside the weather was anything but cold.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 1). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63592223

Two weeks later,  the weather was a little more Autumn like.

LADIES' COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 - 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

LADIES’ COLUMN. (1889, March 15). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63622402

A “pretty” apron from 1892 with a handy pocket and a cheap price tag.

FASHION'S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

FASHION’S FRIVOLITIES. (1892, February 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO The Horsham Times.. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72722663

Colourful straw hats were in vogue for Autumn 1904.

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ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

ABOUT HATS. (1904, March 18). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved February 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87354212

Jeanne Paquin was a French fashion designer known for her tailored gowns.  In 1905, her influence was evident in the fashions reaching Australian shores.

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WOMAN'S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

WOMAN’S WORLD. (1905, March 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72815249

The following dress  from 1907, in a chiffon Panama material, gives us some idea of the sewing skills that have sadly been lost today.  Horsham ladies did not have to go to the city to buy such a dress.  They could order a Buttericks  pattern from M. Thorp & Co of Melbourne.

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LADIES' COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

LADIES’ COSTUME. (1907, April 12). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 1 Supplement: Supplement to the Horsham Times. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72939046

Shades of purple were popular in 1913, especially for hats and veils.

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FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1913, March 26). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93194629

By 1914, Horsham ladies not handy with the needle were able to buy fashion equal to their city counterparts without leaving town.

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

AUTUMN MODES. (1914, March 17). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72900577

Those that suffered for fashion’s sake, would have pleased to see the back of the tight skirt.

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

OR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1914, April 1). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74224403

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1916, February 23). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75256133

Autumn hats for 1917 had few trimmings, although the white felt hat embroidered with Greek dancing-girls sounds far from plain.

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1917, January 24). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74519149

By the end of January 1917, autumn and winter clothing was appearing in the shops, the last thing shoppers wanted to see during a hot summer.  Coat frocks were in and the coatee was flattering for ladies of all shapes and sizes.

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WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1917, January 24). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1592469

WW1 limited the supply of precious stones for jewellery, with diamonds becoming rare and in turn expensive.  Charm bracelets and three stone engagement rings were popular and wedding rings had narrowed.  Earrings were rarely worn and when they were they were a simple stud.

Colours were of subdued tones, fitting for the times.  Suits had few trimmings, relying on a smart cut for style.

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WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 - 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

WAR-TIME JEWELLERY. (1917, April 4). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74520158

Tyler’s of Bridge Street, Ballarat. advertised in the Border Watch of Mt. Gambier a fair distance to travel in 1922 for the latest autumn fashions.

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Advertising. (1922, April 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77674135

Some distinctive 1920s styles.

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AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1923, March 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1884490

There was plenty of colour on offer with the Autumn fashions of 1926, from rosewood to smoke greys and everything in between.  Imitation fur trimmings were popular on coats and handbags.

OUR WOMEN'S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

OUR WOMEN’S CORNER. (1926, March 23). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73002991

A Coolie coat from 1927.

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FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, April 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72625587

Styles from Autumn 1934.

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The Fashion Parade. (1934, February 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 23. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46465428

Geoffrey Turton, aka Petrov, was an Australian magazine illustrator and cartoonist.  He worked on publications such as the Bulletin and Smiths Weekly, but also the Australian Women’s Weekly.  The following is an example of work from the Weekly, depicting Autumn styles from 1935.

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The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved March 4, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

There was plenty of choice available for Autumn 1935, with ladies able to choose the look they preferred.aut46aut47

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1935, January 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47208042

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

The Fashion Parade. (1936, February 22). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46942701

Friday March 19, 1937 was the date for the opening show of E.S. Finkemeyer’s Autumn and Winter fashions.

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

AUTUMN AND WINTER SHOW 1937. (1937, March 26). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73110816

Black worn with accessories in a new red, “rebel red”, was a fashionable look for 1940.

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

Treatment of Skirts Shows Variety. (1940, March 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 11. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12429983

A promotion for Australian woollen garments during Autumn 1941.

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

Fashion triumph for AUSTRALIAN WOOLLENS. (1941, March 29). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21 Section: Autumn Fashion Book. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47483414

A cardigan perfect for those cooler March evenings.

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

Advertising. (1941, April 26). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 5. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47484959

During WW2, when French and Italian fashion houses closed, America came to the forefront of fashion.

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

AMERICA LAUNCHES AUTUMN FASHIONS. (1944, November 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11372401

Sewing patterns from 1945.

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

Fashion PATTERNS. (1945, April 14). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47118096

The following two suits sure have that 1940s war-time look about them.

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman's Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

FASHIONS FOR THE AUTUMN. (1947, February 19). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: Woman’s Magazine. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22409723

This crêpe dress from 1950 was in contrast to the 1947 fashions, above.

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

No Title. (1950, April 25). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72801557

In 1955, Tweed fashions for ladies emerged, not just tomboys, as did the jersey dress that washed like a stocking.

TWEED... is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

TWEED… is a Lady. (1955, February 22). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 4 Supplement: THE ARGUS SUPPLEMENT OF EXCLUSIVE MYER FASHION. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71634754

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The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

The 3-T Gersey Frock. (1955, March 1). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71642613

Max Factor cosmetics were 40 years old when this glamorous Myer advertisement appeared in the Australian Women’s Weekly.  Hollywood starlets such as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor had made red lips sexy.

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Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Advertising. (1955, March 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 21. Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71641049

Summer Fashion

Summer fashion is about keeping cool, but  spare a thought for the women of the 19th century.  Western Victoria is at the bottom of mainland Australia yet that makes  little difference once summer comes, with temperatures reaching 40 degrees on some days, even in the far south-west.  Imagine arriving from England in February, often the hottest summer month, and having to adapt to  heat never experienced before, whilst dressed in inappropriate clothing.

Clothes found in the shops came from overseas made from materials unsuited to the Australian climate.  Throw in a crinoline, corset, petticoats, bloomers, boots and it all made for an uncomfortable summer.  Eventually women did shed some layers but it did take time.

This advertisement from the Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser is from 1842, early days of  colony’s settlement.  James Gladwell was due to take possession of a range of summer clothing fresh off the boat from England.  For those that did not want clothing, they could always buy a framed print of “His Majesty George the III, hunting”

Advertising. (1842, November 19). Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876), p. 2. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71568834

In 1844, a Pardessus,  a type of coat, was a “most useful appendage to a lady’s outdoor costume”.   Italian taffeta was popular and pink, blue and violet were the fashionable colours.

SUMMER FASHIONS. (1844, January 4). Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 – 1846), p. 4. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84772233

Fashion reports cam from England and were for the wealthier woman, with much of the clothing too impractical and expensive for the average pioneering woman .  The following article is about June fashions (English summer) and published in September 1849 for the Australian summer.

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LADIES' FASHIONS FOR JUNE. (1849, September 27). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved December 1, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93139412

LADIES’ FASHIONS FOR JUNE. (1849, September 27). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 – 1851), p. 2 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved December 1, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93139412

In 1856, a visit to Miss Reed on Main Road, Ballarat was a must for the latest summer clothing from the Fashion houses of Paris and London selling at a range of prices.

Advertising. (1856, December 27). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), p. 1. Retrieved December 1, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66040226

Advertising. (1856, December 27). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 – 1864), p. 1. Retrieved December 1, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66040226

The following sketches are from an article from the Illustrated Sydney News of December 9, 1876  subtitled “Seaside Dress and Bathing Costume”

THE FASHIONS. (1876, December 9). Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 – 1872), p. 5. Retrieved November 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63334047

The accompanying description of the outfit third from the left is below:

THE FASHIONS. (1876, December 9). Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 – 1872), p. 5. Retrieved November 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63334047

For the ladies of Horsham in November 1889, news was that a cord loop on the end of a parasol was a fashionable accessory for summer 1889.  Cashmere was popular as was the  “Greek polanaise” dress and mosseline delaine, a material which was taking the place of nun’s veiling.

Ladies’ Column. (1889, November 5). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 2 Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE HORSHAM TIMES. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72862812

In 1892, the Portland Guardian’s regular column “World of Fashion” reported summer fashions as “likened to a flower garden in full bloom”.  A dress in peach blossom striped silk perfect for an afternoon by the water.

WORLD OF FASHION. (1892, December 16). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 2 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: Supplement to the Portland Guardian.. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65441419

During a New Year’s heat wave, the Williamstown Chronicle argued that the summer fashions were unsuitable for the climate and it was time for clothing specifically made for the conditions.

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OUR LADIES' COLUMN. (1892, January 2). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 2, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68595885

OUR LADIES’ COLUMN. (1892, January 2). Williamstown Chronicle (Vic. : 1856 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved December 2, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68595885

A bathing costume from 1894.

A Bathing Costume. (1894, September 28). The Broadford Courier and Reedy Creek Times (Broadford, Vic. : 1893 – 1916), p. 5. Retrieved November 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58882443

Voile was a popular material for summer 1904.  This dress was brown, yes brown, but there were varying shades of brown such as tabac and earth.  Where did the blooming flower garden go?

GOSSIP. (1904, September 16). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89708376

A lady’s blouse from 1909.  Patterns were available by mail order from M.Thorp & Co. of Collins Street, Melbourne.  Horsham ladies could get the same look as those from the city.

LADY’S BLOUSE. (1909, October 22). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72962676

A lady wouldn’t want to walk too close to a horse in this hat.

A FIELD-FLOWER HAT. (1909, October 22). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 8. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91852132

Another pattern from M.Thorp & Co. This dress is from their 1911 range.

LADY’S COSTUME. (1911, February 24). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 9. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73159315

A hat is an important part of a summer outfit in Australia and in 1912 wide brims were in.

FOR WIVES AND DAUGHTERS. (1912, October 2). The Colac Herald (Vic. : 1875 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87620359

It gets hot in Horsham and in 1913, the Horsham Times were offering tips on cool clothing.  Wool was too warm while silk was the coolest of materials.  The advice to ladies was to put their black clothes away until winter and bring out their white attire.

COOL CLOTHES. (1913, October 10). The Horsham Times Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 9. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72888408

A bathing costume from 1913.

THE LADIES’ COLUMN. (1913, January 21). West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 – 1930) , p. 5 Edition: MORNING.. Retrieved November 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68662168

More tips on keeping cool, this time from The Argus of 1913.  The “Women to Women” column advised not to wrap babies in blankets during summer and young children should be dressed in fewer clothes.  “Women themselves have realised the comfort of the scanty clothing that they have been wearing during the last two or three years.  It is only a very old-fashioned woman nowadays who ever wears two petticoats”

WOMEN TO WOMEN. (1913, December 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7274211

Advertising. (1913, December 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7274208

The Port Fairy Gazette of January 19, 1914 advertised a pattern for a Ladies’ Bathing Gown.

Advertising. (1914, January 19). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 4 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91987072

Fur trimming was popular in the summer of 1916.  Really.

FROM NECK TO FEET. (1916, December 7). Port Fairy Gazette (Vic. : 1914 – 1918), p. 5 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88008299

This is a great photo from the State Library of Victoria’s collection.  The ladies are on Sorrento beach, Victoria.

Group of women standing ankle deep in water at Sorrento courtesy of the State Library of Victoria  .http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/44447

Group of women standing ankle deep in water at Sorrento courtesy of the State Library of Victoria .http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/44447

The following dress was an English design.  The article from The Argus of August 27, 1919 notes that it would have to be adapted to suit the Australian summer with a longer sleeve needed to prevent burning.

SUMMER CLOTHING. (1919, August 27). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4700420

SUMMER CLOTHING. (1920, August 11). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4590862

I don’t know what to say about the next photo so I will say nothing at all…

A young woman wearing a bathing costume ca 1920 Image courtesy of the State Library of South Australia – PRG 280/1/17/559 http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/searcy/17/PRG280_1_17_559.htm

Summer fashions from 1924.

WOMAN’S REALM. (1924, January 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 14. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1932240

Get the knitting needles out and whip up this royal blue surf suit made from 4 ply wool.

JUST SEE What We Have Secured FOR YOU… (1935, August 31). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 47 Section: THE AUSTRALIAN WOMEN’S WEEKLY HOME MAKER. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52247098

An earlier article from the Horsham Times of 1913, proclaimed wool too warm for summer wear.  Twenty-two years later, designers had learnt the secret of sheep – wool really is cool.  Good for the sheep farmers of the Western District and Wimmera too.

“COOL WOOL”. (1935, October 1). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved November 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75237170

Prints were everywhere in the summer of 1936 and I mean everywhere.  Not only were there print dresses and blouses, but also bags, belts and gloves.  Not just floral prints but also animal prints, musical notes and even fish.

The Fashion Parade. (1936, September 5). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47477428

Let’s not forget summer shoes.  Shoes from 1939 were metallic, mesh and lace up.

SUMMER SHOES… (1939, August 19). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 31 Supplement: Fashion Portfolio. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51942459

SUMMER SHOES… (1939, August 19). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 31 Supplement: Fashion Portfolio. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51942459

Also from 1939, news that cotton playsuits could double as swim suits.  There were also towelling two piece numbers and woollen swimsuits.  Also, just for those who wanted an even tan, boned tops, that stayed up even when the straps were slipped off the shoulder.

ALLURING SWIM SUITS—. (1939, November 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 10 Supplement: The Argus Week-end Magazine. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11289777

Beach outfits from  the 1940s.

1940

FUN on the BEACH. (1940, January 6). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 8 Supplement: FASHION PORTFOLIO. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46935395

1941

Summer play togs gayer than ever… (1941, November 15). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 23 Section: Fashion Portfolio. Retrieved November 27, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47482941

1945

SUN SOAKERS… (1945, September 29). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 27. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51281589

WW2  was over and cotton was in short supply but it had taken a step up the hierarchy of fabrics.  Not just for tea towels or cheap knock-about frocks, cotton was being used for “finer clothes”.

Topics Feminine. (1946, November 16). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 12. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article79864845

American fashion houses, set up after WW2, were sending their beach wear Australia’s way in 1947, even those made from plastic coated aluminum yarn.

Topics Feminine. (1947, January 4). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 12. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78134282

Strapless swimsuits were fashionable in 1949 as were pedal pushers, although judging by the photo which accompanied the article, I’m not sure why.  But as the article suggest they were perfect for those  with “not too slim” or “not to shapely” legs.  Tan, caramel, navy and black were the popular colours.

WOMEN WILL BE WEARING. (1949, September 13). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 2 Supplement: The Argus Woman’s Magazine. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article22778225

What every girls needs, a swimsuit that double as a cocktail dress!

For cocktails —or bathing!. (1954, November 25). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 5. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23461427

Corsets were back in 1956, if only for swimsuits.  A relief for the writer of the “Woman’s Page”, who was glad to see an end of, she thought, swimsuits looking like a couple of handkerchiefs knotted  together.

Woman’s Page. (1956, January 17). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 9. Retrieved November 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72530649


Spring Fashion

Spring has arrived and a girl’s thoughts turn to a new season’s wardrobe.   This was no different in 1940, 1900 and even 1860 with retailers promoting new season’s trends from as early as July.  Ladies in Western Victoria would have required their woollens for a few more months , but a new Spring outfit was necessary for the milder days and social outings.

Mr David Jones was offering a “Grand Show” of spring wear at his shop on Main Road, Ballarat in 1858.

Advertising. (1858, September 15). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 – 1864), p. 1. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66050200

In 1862, the Old Criterion Store on Main Road Ballarat offered 1000 parasols for sale, perfect  to keep the Australian sun’s harsh rays at bay.

Advertising. (1862, October 13). The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 – 1864), p. 1. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66327869

A sample of spring fashions from 1878.

Spring Fashions. (1878, September 7). Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 – 1872), p. 7. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63335118

Spring fashions for the elegant lady of 1885.

[No heading]. (1885, August 24). The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 – 1889), p. 133. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5739497

 

The following article appeared in the Portland Guardian on August 1881and offered spring fashion tips for the ladies of the Western District.  White, all shades of red and heliotrope were the colours of the season.  Grey was the new black and black was back.  Cashmere and plaid wool fabrics were popular as were ribbons and beading for embellishment.

THE LADIES’ COLUMN. (1888, August 31). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 3 Edition: EVENING, Supplement: SUPPLEMENT TO THE PORTLAND GUARDIAN. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63589936

The 20th century arrived but fashion was so last century.

THE LADIES’ COLUMN. (1905, July 25). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30351894

Fashion began to evolve during World War 1.  One change was dress length, with hems going up to save material.  An interesting website Fashion Era offers further examples of fashion during this period.

SPRING FASHIONS. (1915, August 4). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1544786

T

These dresses from 1918 show traditional styles were still popular.

Spring Fashions. (1916, September 2). The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889, 1914 – 1918), p. 7. Retrieved August 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74835347

But things were changing and this dress, also from 1918, is an example of that.

COMING FASHIONS. (1918, July 10). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 28, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1404142

I love this stylish advertisement for Allans The Drapers of Fibrace street Horsham from 1927.

Advertising. (1927, September 2). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72996175

Fancy the Phryne Fisher look?

FASHION FORECASTS. (1928, August 3). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 8. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72676520

I can’t resist sharing more of the wonderful 1920s fashions, again from the “Horsham Times”.

Advertising. (1929, October 4). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 9. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72672337

Another stylish look,  this time from 1930.

Woman’s Interests. (1930, July 3). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78010734

The Great Depression saw a rise in the number of sewing columns in the newspapers.  This article gave advice on how to recycle a frock.  The full article is here

“THE ARGUS” SHOOPING PAGE. (1930, August 8). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 12. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4104490

Patterns were back for Spring 1935.

Gay Patterns for Spring Frocks. (1935, August 14). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 15. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11757450

World War 2 saw a dramatic drop in the number of “spring fashion” articles in the papers, more so than the Great War.  The years 1942, 1943 and 1944 had very few and those I found were mostly for sewing patterns.   Families relied on coupons to buy goods, there was rationing of goods including fabrics and the fashion houses of Paris closed.  If a woman wanted to keep up appearances, there was little alternative but to make a frock or remodel one from last season.  The latter half of the 1940s saw a rapid increase in fashion articles as women turned again to the fashion stages of Europe for inspiration and cast aside their drab wartime clothing.

BE CHIC… but coupon canny. (1942, October 17). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 7. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46446873

A few bright notions to cope with a war budget. (1942, January 10). The Australian Women’s Weekly (1933 – 1982), p. 24 Section: Fashion Portfolio. Retrieved August 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article54876753

Shock, horror “Hems to go higher” in 1952.  Just wait until the 60s!

Hems to go higher. (1952, May 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 5. Retrieved August 26, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23197518

I could have continued to the 1960s but that would have gone on for some time as I do like the fashion particularly from the latter half of the decade. I could have gone on to the 70s too.  While fashion from that decade was much maligned during the 1980s, anyone who saw Paper Giants: The Birth of Cleo was reminded of the great fashions of the 1970s.  I think the 1980s would have pulled it up though. Agreed?

Looking at  fashions of  different eras is beneficial to the family historian especially if you are trying to date photos.  It also gives us some idea of what our female ancestors might have endured for either the sake of fashion or managing with what was available.  The long, impractical dresses of the 19th and early 20th century make me think of my ggg grandmothers on farms, getting in and out of buggies and tending fires for washing and cooking.  Consider how your grandmothers or great grandmothers managed during the Depression when money was tight or  World War 2 with coupons and rationing.  No wonder my Nana was good at sewing, darning and knitting. It was a necessity.

***If you are interested in learning how your female ancestors washed their big dresses during the 1850s, the Sovereign Hill Education blog has great posts on washing, drying and ironing.


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