Tag Archives: genealogy

Genealogy in the Papers

Just for fun, I thought I would search the term “genealogy” at Trove.  There were 7, 897 matches, so I narrowed the search down to papers that serviced the Western District.  What I found was a mix of humorous pieces, hints and more.

One of the earliest references I found was from the Camperdown Chronicle of June 20, 1899.  I wonder where Mr Meek’s genealogical charts got to?

NEWS Of THE DISTRICT. (1899, June 20). Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35716123

This piece did the rounds of the papers in 1908:

A FAMILY TREE. (1908, December 19). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77450557

From the Border Watch of October 7, 1911, some tips on tracing your family tree:

HOW TO TRACE YOUR ANCESTRY. (1911, October 7). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77477729

This is an excerpt of an interesting article from the Horsham Times of December 29, 1914 about  London’s Public Record Office:

WONDERS OF THE RECORD OFFICE. (1914, December 29). The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72968404

Were these genealogical pedigrees really a bargain or just a scam?

Bargains in Ancestors. (1928, March 15). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954), p. 6. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77703474

The article from the Border Watch of March 15, 1928 does go on with a disclaimer from Mr Anjou , described as a reclusive “pedigree king”.

If the earlier advice on tracing a family tree was not successful, one could always employ the services of G.P.Townend.

Classified Advertising. (1920, January 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 1. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1674996

The next article appeared on what could be best described as the “funnies” page of The Portland Guardian of February 24, 1927.  I wonder if G.P, Townend charged in the same way?

PROBABLY NECESSARY. (1927, February 24). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64256338

If you are related to the Wells family of Portland and Mt Gambia (sic), you best be quick and contact Bruce Cartwright of Honolulu!

NEWS OF PIONEERS SOUGHT. (1931, September 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 1 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64296112

If you have ever gone searching for Ballarat Supreme Court records prior to 1920, stop looking, they were pulped.

ARCHIVES DESTROYED. (1940, September 6). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1956), p. 2. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11313187

I’m glad this stereotype of a genealogist, from 1928, has changed.  It has, hasn’t it??

 

BY VAN. (1928, June 7). Portland Guardian (Vic. : 1876 – 1953), p. 5 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64265966

That is just a small selection of what could be found about genealogy in the early papers of the Western District.  Try it for yourself and see what you find from the localities you research.  I also searched “genealogist” and had 863 matches, so I will leave you with one of the results from that search from the Western Argus of Kalgoorlie:

DEFINITION. (1937, April 20). Western Argus (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1916 – 1938), p. 29. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article34930453

 

 

 

 

 


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